Board Agenda

Fenton Charter Public Schools

Meeting of the Board of Directors 

AGENDA
FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes.

 

FCPS: 8928 B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 962-3630

FACS: 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342 • (818) 896-7482

SMBCCS: 1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038 • (323) 469-0971

FPC: 11351 DronfieldAvenue, Pacoima, CA 91331 • (818) 485-5900

STEM and FCLA: 8926 Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 • (818) 962-3636

 

REGULAR MEETING - BOARD OF DIRECTORS

May 17, 2018 – 4:30 P.M.

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA  90038

AGENDA

Instructions for Presentations to the Board by Parents and Citizens

The Fenton Charter Public Schools ("Charter Schools'") welcome your participation at the Charter Schools' Board meetings. The purpose of a public meeting of the Board of Directors ("Board") is to conduct the affairs of the Charter  Schools  in public. Your participation assures us of continuing community interest in our Charter Schools. To assist you in the case of speaking/ participating in our meetings, the following guide lines are provided:

 

  1. Agendas are available to all audience members at the door to the meeting. 
  1. '"Request to Speak" forms are available to all audience members who wish to speak on any agenda items or under the general category of " Presentations from the Public."" "Presentations from the Public" is set aside for members of the audience to raise issues that are not specifically on the However, due to public meeting laws, the Board can only list e n to your issue, not respond or take action. These presentations are limited to three (3) minutes and total time allotted to non-agenda items will not exceed fifteen (15) minutes. The Board may give direction to staff to respond to your concern or you may be offered the option of returning with a citizen-requested item.
  1. You may also complete a "Request to Speak'" form to address the Board on Agenda items. With regard to such agenda items, you may specify that agenda item on your "Request to Speak" form and you will be given an opportunity to speak for up to five (5) minutes when the Board discusses that item. The total time allocated to agenda items will not exceed thirty (30) minutes per item.
  1. When addressing the Board. speakers are requested to state their name and address from the podium and adhere to the time limits set forth. 
  1. Any public records relating to an agenda item for an open session of the Board which are distributed to all, or a majority of all, of the Board members shall be available for public inspection at 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, California.

I. PRELIMINARY

 

A. Call to Order – Chairperson of the Board – Joe Lucente

 

B. Roll Call – Secretary of the Board – Teresa Elvira, Walter Gomez, Robin Rodriguez, Megan Stevenson

 

C. Flag Salute – Chair Lucente

 

D. Additions/Corrections to the Agenda – Chair Lucente

 

E. Minutes of Previous Regular Meeting - Chair Lucente

 

Minutes of the April 12, 2018, 2017 Regular Meeting of the Board of Directors will be presented for approval.

 

It is recommended that the Board approve the minutes of the previous meeting.

 

II. COMMUNICATIONS

 

A. Presentations from the Public – Chair Lucente

 

Any persons present desiring to address the Board of Directors on any proper matter.

 

Agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than five (5) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed thirty (30) minutes per agenda item. 

 

Non-agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than three (3) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed fifteen (15) minutes. 

 

Ordinarily, Board members will not respond to presentations and no action can be taken.  However, the Board may give direction to staff following a presentation.

 

B. Committee/Council Reports

 

1. Finance Committee – Sarah Ananta, Maria Patrón (FPC); Holly Putman  (SMBCCS); Toni Frear (FCLA); Kelley Christenson (STEM)

Budget, Facilities and Safety Council – Tony Peña, Martin Penner  (FACS)

 

2. Instruction Committee – Mara Shinn Smith, Nitima Angus (FPC); Gaby Arroyo, Jennifer Nishimoto (SMBCCS); Veronica Palazzola (FCLA); Angie Castellana Ferri (STEM)

Curriculum and Assessment Council – Lilia Padilla Zúñiga, Christopher Torres (FACS)

 

3. Personnel Committee – Nina Arguera, Coco Salazar (FPC); Walter Gomez, Robin Rodriguez (SMBCCS); Nicole Langlois (FCLA); Jennifer Pimentel (STEM)

Human Resource and Personnel Council – Rolando Gutierrez (FACS)

 

4. Parent/Community Advocacy – Krystal Hernandez, Abigail Lopez-Dee (FPC); Ariana Gomez, Bunny Wolfer (SMBCCS); Cecilia Quijano (FCLA); Crisinda Ismail (STEM)

School-Community Relations Council – Elizabeth Jimenez, Cheryl Perkins (FACS)

 

a. School Site Council

b. English Learner Advisory Committee

 

C. Treasurer/CFO’s Report:  Kristin Dietz, Vice President, EdTec - FCPS Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer will present financial statements, cash flow position, and any variations in revenues and expenditures from the approved 2017-2018 budgets as of March 31, 2018.

 

D. Directors’ Reports

 

1. Fenton Avenue Charter School (FACS) – Mrs. Stacy Hutter

 

2. Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School (SMBCCS) – Dr. David Riddick

 

3. Fenton Primary Center (FPC) – Mr. Richard Parra

 

4. Fenton STEM Academy (STEM) – Mrs. Jennifer Miller

 

5. Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (FCLA) – Mr. Cary Rabinowitz

 

F. Executive Director’s Report:  Irene Sumida

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items.

 

A. Recommendation to approve software, instructional materials and resources, and communication tools for all sites

 

B. Recommendation to approve 2018-2019 calendars

It is recommended that the Board approve the Consent Agenda.

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

A. Recommendation to approve adoption of Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) California Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual to supplement FCPS General Accounting Manual

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.A.

 

B. Recommendation to approve revised General Accounting Policies and Procedures Manual

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.B.

 

C. Recommendation to approve salary schedules for all employees

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.C.

 

D. Recommendation to approve 2018-2019 Kaiser Permanente and Health Net plans for medical benefits for benefited employees

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.D.

 

E. Recommendation to approve policy clarifying the Health Benefits Opt-Out Agreement

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.E.

 

F. Recommendation to approve contract with NWEA™ for MAP® assessments for 2018-2019

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.F.

 

G. Recommendation to approve agreement with Illuminate Education, Inc.

 

It is recommended that the Board approve Item IV.G.

 

H. Recommendation to approve revised schedule of technology and maintenance upgrades

 

It is recommended that the Board approve Item IV.H.

 

I. Recommendation to approve new three-year Master Services Agreement with EdTec, Inc.

 

It is recommended that the Board approve Item IV.I.

 

J. Recommendation to approve continued membership in the California Charter Schools Association

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.J.

 

K. Recommendation to approve notice to authorizing district, LAUSD, to reserve the right of Fenton schools to leave LAUSD SELPA

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.K.

 

L. Recommendation to approve Ad Hoc Committee to nominate FCPS Board members for 2018-2019

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.L.

M. Recommendation to approve evaluation documents and process for Chief Academic Officer and Instructional Coaches

 

It is recommended that the Board approve item IV.M.

V. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION

 

A. Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

B. FCPS Core Values

VI. CLOSED SESSION

 

Chair Lucente will make the following announcement:

“The Board of Directors will now be moving into closed session to discuss matters described in Section VI.  Matters to be discussed are those permitted by Government Code Section 54956.9 (litigation).”

 

Convene to closed session

 

A. LITIGATON:  (Government Code 54956.9)

EXISITING LITIGATION - Update

 

VII. RETURN TO OPEN SESSION - ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

Reconvene to open session

 

Chair Lucente will announce any action taken in Closed Session.

 

VIII. ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

IX. ADJOURNMENT

 

The meeting was adjourned at ____________________.

 

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools will be held on Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools Administrative and Business Offices, 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

 

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance, disability-related modifications or accommodations, including auxiliary aids or services, in order to participate in the public meeting of the FCPS Board of Directors, please contact the main office of either Fenton Avenue Charter School or the Fenton Primary Center at (818) 896-7482.  Notification of 72 hours prior to the meeting will enable FCPS to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accommodations and accessibility to this meeting.  Upon request, FCPS shall also make available this agenda and all other public records associated with this meeting in appropriate alternative formats for persons with disabilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. C.

 

Committee and Council Reports

 

 

 

 

II. D.

 

Treasurer/CFO’s Report

 

 

 

 

 

II. E.

 

Directors’ Reports

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.E.1.

FENTON AVENUE CHARTER SCHOOL (FACS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

The mission of Fenton Avenue Charter School is to further instill the joy of learning by creating an environment that promotes confident, self-reliant, interdependent learners who become productive, contributing citizens of the community.

 

State Charter Number:  30

 

General Information on Enrollment and Attendance:

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School Enrollment (3-5):

Transitional Kindergarten

3rd Grade

4th Grade

5th Grade

Total

35

232

257

259

783

 

Actual Daily Attendance for the Month (ADA): 96.13% Cumulative for the Year: 96.79% 

 

Enrollment and Attendance: Enrollment at Fenton Avenue Charter School is 783 with ADA of 96.13%.  The cumulative ADA for FACS is 96.79%.  We are currently accepting enrollment forms for the 2108-2019 school year.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Fenton Avenue Charter School operates an inclusive special education program, including an intensive learning center, with comprehensive services provided by high quality staff members. The following information describes the varied eligibilities, service providers, and hiring needs for 2018-2019 in the area of Special Education.

 

119 total Students with Disabilities        15% Special Education 15.9% Moderate/Severe

 

At FACS, 15% of the total population have been identified as Students with Disabilities(SWD).  Of the 119 students currently with IEP’s, 15.9% are considered to have Moderate/Severe needs.

 

Student Eligibilities

SLI

SLD

ED

OHI

ID

AUT

HOH

VI

6

55

1

39

3

15

0

0

 

SLI – Speech Language Impairment      ID – Intellectual Disability ED – Emotional Disturbance OHI – Other Health Impairment

VI – Visual Impairment        SLD – Specific Learning Disability AUT – Autism HOH – Hard of Hearing

 

The following table indicates the number of service providers at FACS. For service providers that are contracted or employed for a portion of the week, a decimal is utilized to indicate the percentage of service provided. For example, Adapted PE is offered one day per week or 20% (.2) of a full week.

 

Service Providers/Teachers

Psych

SDC/

ILC

EdS

EdSI

SLP

SLPA

OT

PT

APE

DHH

VI

Couns

ERICS

RBT

1

1

4

0

1

0

.2c

0

.2c

.2c

0

1

.1c

.2

PSYCH – Psychologist                  EdS – Educational Specialist                 SLP – Speech-Language Pathologist                   PT – Physical Therapist

SDC – Special Day Class                OT – Occupational Therapist               SLPA – Speech Language                                   Couns – Counselor

ILC – Intensive Learning Center    EdSI – Educational Specialist Intern   APE – Adaptive Physical Education Teacher     

ERICS – Counselor/Psychologist                                                              DHH – Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist Pathology Assistant

c- Contracted                                                                                              RBT-  Registered Behavior Technician

 

Special Education Paraprofessionals

SPED AIDE

Adult Assistant

Behavior Interventionist (BII)

5

16

2

 

Special Education Staffing Update:

 

FACS plans to hire the following special education staff members for the 2018-2019 school year:

  • Education Specialists – 2

 

State Mandated Testing - CAASPP (SBAC) & California Science Test (CAST): All FACS students (grades 3rd – 5th) are participating in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) tests from April 23rd through May 18th (make-up testing will continue through 5/25). Our 5th graders will also take the new California Science Pilot Test (CAST) the week of May 14th.

 

Hiring of New Staff & Staff Update: The FACS hiring committee has chosen the following personnel to join the FACS team next year:

 

3rd Grade Teacher: Breanne Francois

 

We are still seeking two Education Specialist Intern/Education Specialist Teachers.  Beginning 2018-2019, Alin Kazarian, School Counselor, will be shared with FCLA/STEM.

 

Enrollment Update: To date, our enrollment for next year is 776 students, including the students who will matriculate from Fenton Primary Center.  In 2018-2019, FACS will have the following grade level configurations:

  • TK: Two classrooms
  • 3rd Grade: 10 classrooms
  • 4th Grade: 9 classrooms
  • 5th Grade: 10 classrooms
  • Intensive Learning Centers: 2 classrooms

 

Currently, all grade levels are enrolled at 24-26 students per classroom and TK will serve 20 students per class. 

 

FACS Lead Teachers Selected: FACS selected their lead teachers for the 2018-2019 school year.  We would like to congratulate the following teachers on being selected as the 2018-2019 lead teachers (pending Board approval):

  • 3rd Grade: Christopher Torres
  • 4th Grade: Rebecca Williamson and Lee Melo
  • 5th Grade: Cynthia Eschenfelder and Juan Gomez
  • Special Education: Svetlana Jodele and Jacqueline Claudio

 

Faculty and Classified Representatives: FACS representatives will continue their two-year term through 2019:

  • Faculty Representatives: Barbara Ausherman and Mercedes Meeks
  • Classified Representative: Karla Contreras

 

Student Reorganization for 2018-2019: Fenton Avenue Charter School has completed the student reorganization for the 2018-2019 school year.  Parents will be notified of their child’s class placement on the end-of-year report card.

 

Gifted and Talented Program (GATE) – Parent Meeting: Fenton Avenue Charter School hosted the Spring GATE Parent meeting on May 16th.  Students and families enjoyed a continental breakfast, received information about summer enrichment opportunities and received information about the technology component of the GATE program.

 

LA’s Best After School Enrichment-Mariachi Recital at the Colburn School: On Tuesday, May 15, the 40 student members of FACS’ Mariachi band will perform at the Colburn School in downtown Los Angeles.  Our mariachi musicians have been learning to play the traditional instruments all year, including the guitar and guitarrón.  All year, students have rehearsed and been instructed by an accomplished Mariachi musician.  Students can take their instruments home every day.  We are very excited about this performance and the enrichment it will provide for our students.  Colburn is a performing arts school with a focus on music and dance located in downtown Los Angeles adjacent to the Museum of Contemporary Art and across the street from the Walt Disney Concert Hall

 

Professional Development Day #7:  Fenton Avenue Charter School will focus on cumulative records compliance, ELD folders and compliance, the RFEP Monitoring Form and Closing Bulletin for the May 25th professional development day. 

 

Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) Field Trip: On May 14, the classes of Ms. Brenneisen and Ms. Eschenfelder will visit the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena.  The office of Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez graciously donated a bus for this exciting STEM focused field trip.

 

School Nutrition Plus Alphabet Train: The Alphabet Produce Train visited FACS in May. The staff joined the students as they sampled the delicious salads with healthy ingredients representing every letter of the alphabet.  Not only is it beautiful to look at every year, it is delicious.  The Alphabet Produce Train and corresponding classroom activities help FACS meet specific components of the Fenton Avenue Charter School Wellness Plan.

 

Teacher Appreciation Week: In May, FACS celebrated Teacher Appreciation Week with treats and kind words of encouragement.  Our teachers were also recognized by the Parent Voice group.

 

Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP): The staff will review and revise the updated LCAP in time for Board approval in June.

 

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

  • May 22-24 3rd, 4th and TK End-of-Year Awards Assemblies
  • June 11-15, 2018 5th Grade Culminations – 10 classes
  • June 15, 2018 Last Day of the 2017-2018 School Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.E.2.

SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL (SMBCCS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School promotes academic achievement in a collaborative environment that creates self-confident, self-reliant learners who will become positive contributors to their communities.

 

State Charter Number:  446

 

Enrollment        Numbers as of May 11, 2018

              Enrollment: 919 (TK-6) (compared to 919 in April, 2018)

                  94 (Preschool) (compared to 91 in April, 2018)

                    April ADA: 97.12%

      SMBCCS Cumulative ADA: 97.67%

 

ENROLLMENT

 

PreK

TK

K

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

Total

94

36

115

142

135

118

159

147

67

1,013

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

SMBCCS has a thriving special education program with the following eligibilities, service providers, and special education paraprofessionals.

 

148 total Students with Disabilities         16% Special Education  13.5% Moderate/Severe

 

At SMBCCS, 16% of the total population have been identified as Students with Disabilities(SWD).  Of the 148 students currently with IEP’s, 13.5% are considered to have Moderate/Severe needs.

 

Student Eligibilities

SLI

SLD

ED

OHI

ID

AUT

HOH

VI

20

89

0

19

1

19

0

0

 

SLI – Speech Language Impairment ID – Intellectual Disability 

SLD – Specific Learning Disability AUT – Autism

ED – Emotional Disturbance HOH – Hard of Hearing

OHI – Other Health Impairment VI – Visual Impairment

 

The following table indicates the number of service providers at SMBCCS. For service providers that are contracted or employed for a portion of the week, a decimal is utilized to indicate the percentage of service provided. For example, Adapted PE is offered one day per week or 20% (.2) of a full week.

 

Service Providers/Teachers

Psychologist

SDC/

ILC

EdS

EdSI

SLP

SLPA

OT

PT

APE

DHH

VI

Couns

ERICS

RBT

2

2

4

0

.5C

1C

.2C

0

.2C

0

0

1

0

.2

 

 

PSYCH – Psychologist

SDC – Special Day Class                                  SLPA – Speech Language Pathology Assistant

ILC – Intensive Learning Center                                  OT – Occupational Therapist

EdS – Educational Specialist                            PT – Physical Therapist

EdSI – Educational Specialist Intern                APE – Adaptive Physical Education Teacher

SLP – Speech-Language Pathologist                DHH – Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist

Couns – Counselor                                           ERICS – Counselor/Psychologist

C- Contracted                                                  RBT- Registered Behavior Technician

 

Special Education Paraprofessionals

SPED Aides

Adult Assistant

Behavior Intervention (BII)

9

4

0

 

Special Education Staffing Update:

 

SMBCCS plans to hire the following special education staff members for the 2018-2019 school year.

 

• School Psychologist (has been hired)

• Education Specialist (has been hired)

• Registered Behavior Technician (to be hired)

• Upper SDC Teacher to be hired (to be hired)

• Speech Pathologist (to be hired)

 

Staffing Update:

 

Teachers Recommended for Regular Status: The following teachers have successfully completed two years of formal observation lessons and have met the criteria required for recommendation of regular status: Jennifer Allen, Amanda Hill, and Carmen Solis. 

 

New Certified Staff to SMBCCS:  Pending FCPS Board approval, SMBCCS is delighted to welcome Jocelyn Condo (2nd Grade), Zoe Weiss (3rd Grade), Joy Casucci (4th Grade), Rachel Cohen (5th Grade), Emma Kath (5th Grade), Roshani Solanki (5th Grade), Denise Molina (Educational Specialist), and Tashi Miller (School Psychologist).   

 

INSTRUCTION

 

CAASPP (SBAC): SMBCCS students are currently taking the SBAC assessment in English Language Arts and Mathematics. These are state exams for students in grades 3rd through 6th at SMBCCS and are part of California’s comprehensive plan for supporting high-quality learning at every school.  Students in 4th, 6th, and SDC will take the SBAC May 7th-14th.  Students in 3rd and 5th grade will take the SBAC May 15th-22nd.  Our teachers have done an exceptional job preparing our students for success. 

 

California Science Test (CAST) Field Test: Our 5th grade students will take the California Science (CAST) Field Test on May 30th. The CAST measures what students know and can do using the California Next Generation Science Standards (CA NGSS), which focus on understanding the concepts across such scientific areas as life science, earth and space science, and physical science. The CAST field test is a computer-based test that consists of stand-alone items and includes two or three performance tasks. These performance tasks require students to solve a series of complex problems. Testing should take approximately two hours to complete.  The CAST is expected to be fully operational for the 2018-2019 school year. 

 

Community Relations

 

Young Storyteller Foundation (YSF) on “CBS This Morning”:  YSF was featured on "CBS This Morning" on Friday, May 4th.  YSF provides SMBCCS with mentor-screenwriters that spend one hour a week helping 10 of our students learn the basics of storytelling and in creating their own 5-7 page screenplay. At the end of the 10 weeks, professional actors perform each student’s script in the auditorium in front of parents and our students. YSF offers this program to our students two times a year. Here is a link to the feature.  https://tinyurl.com/y7ae7gmn. 

 

Victory Over Violence Assembly:  On Friday, April 20th, Santa Monica students were able to participate in an extraordinary assembly entitled, “Victory Over Violence”.  Victory Over Violence (VOV) is a movement to inspire young people to identify and counteract the root causes of violence in their own lives for individual empowerment.  A special thank you to our special guests including Fernanda Kelly, an Emmy and Telly winner TV Host.  Thank you to our student speakers (Paris Nunez, Sakan Randle, Marisabel Matul, Eileen Reyes, and Yarexi Mejia) for their heart warming speeches.  A special thank you to Sandra Campos for organizing this event. 

 

Viacommunity Day:  On Friday, April 20th, SMBCCS welcomed volunteers from Viacom to engage our students in a number of engaging activities.  Viacommunity Day included volunteers from Paramount, Nickelodeon, MTV, Spike TV, and BET.  The students engaged in indoor and outdoor activities such as Yoga, basketball, relay races, story telling, and a number of science projects.  In addition, we welcomed LAUSD School Board Vice President, Nick Melvoin and a representative from City Councilmember, Mitch O'Farrell’s office.

 

Home Visits: On April 25th, certificated staff visited the home of one student in each class.  The intent was to show appreciation and encourage students and parents who have made significant gains in their academics, attendance, or behavior.  For the past 12 years, SMBCCS staff have taken part in home visits.  It is a great opportunity for us to enter into the community in which we serve.  We were thrilled to be welcomed into homes and meet the supportive families of our children. 

 

McTeacher Night: SMBCCS held a McTeacher’s Night on May 1st.  This event was successful in the money that was raised and in making connections with our parents and the community.  We received $985.75 in profit and a $270.50 from the raffle.  The grand total profit was $1,256.25.  A special thank you to the teachers on our Student Council Community Committee for making this event possible (Ariana Gomez, Carmen Solis, Caroline Engel, Cassie Barrett).    

 

Rally in the Valley: On May 5, 2018, SMBCCS participated in the “Rally in the Valley” sponsored by CSUN-NASA JPL and LEGO Education.  We had 9 teams at the event this year!  This was a citywide robotics event open to traditional public schools, charter schools, magnet schools, and private schools across Los Angeles.  Elementary students compete using LEGO Mindstorm™ Robotics that they design, build, and program to compete in different events.   A special thank you to our Robotics Coaches, Jennifer Nishimoto, Gaby Arroyo, Tiene Hauck, Emily Aaronson, and AJ Smith.  Our coaches have taught coding strategies using the LEGO Mindstorm™ Robotics afterschool.

 

Girls On The Run: On May 6, 2018 SMBCCS students participated in the Girls on the Run 5K at Whittier Narrows Recreation Area in South El Monte.  We are so proud to announce that all of students finished within 45 minutes! Damaris Santos actually finished first out of all 1800+ runners!  Congratulations to our Girls on the Run 5K team!  A special thank you to the Youth Policy Institute for coordinating this event with our students. 

 

Upcoming Events:

  • May 7-14 CAASPP SBAC Testing (4th, 6th, SDC)
  • May 15-22 CAASPP SBAC Testing (3rd, 5th)
  • May 25 Professional Development Day #7 (ELD; Technology)
  • May 31 Open House (5:00 p.m.)
  • June 1 Minimum Day (Technology Training)
  • June 4-7 Semester Awards Assemblies
  • June 15 Last Day of the 2017-2018 School Year
  • June 21 FCPS Board Meeting (11:00 a.m.)
 

 

 

Item II.E.3.

FENTON PRIMARY CENTER (FPC)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Primary Center is to cultivate a love of learning by fostering an environment that promotes self-discovery, independence and an awareness of the connectedness between self and others.

 

State Charter Number:  911

 

General Information on Enrollment and Attendance

 

Fenton Primary Center Enrollment as of May 14, 2018 (TK-2):

Transitional Kindergarten

Kindergarten

1st Grade

2nd Grade

Total

38

245

234

258

775

 

Actual Daily Attendance for the Month (ADA): 97% Cumulative for the Year: 97.6% 

 

2018-2019 Student Enrollment: FPC continues to work on enrollment numbers for the 2018-2019 school year. In March, fifty applications were submitted, and in April, 45 applications we submitted for a total of 95. The goal is to reach 200 by June 15th.      

 

Special Education

FPC’s special education program consists of the following:

 

69 total Students with Disabilities 8.9% Special Education 21.7% Moderate/Severe

 

At FPC, 8.9% of the total population have been identified as Students with Disabilities (SWD).  However, of the 69 students currently with IEP’s, 21.7% are considered to have Moderate/Severe needs.

 

Student Eligibilities

SLI

SLD

ED

OHI

ID

AUT

HOH

VI

22

24

0

8

1

11

2

1

 

SLI – Speech Language Impairment                        ID – Intellectual Disability           

SLD – Specific Learning Disability                        AUT – Autism

ED – Emotional Disturbance                                 HOH – Hard of Hearing

OHI – Other Health Impairment                             VI – Visual Impairment

 

The following table indicates the number of service providers at FPC. For service providers that are contracted or employed for a portion of the week, a decimal is utilized to indicate the percentage of service provided. For example, Adapted PE is offered one day per week or 20% (.2) of a full week.

 

Service Providers/Teachers

Psych

SDC/ILC

EdS

EdSI

SLP

SLPA

OT

PT

APE

DHH

VI

Couns

ERICS

RBT

1

0

2

1

1

0

.2C

0

.2C

.2C

.1C

1

0

.2

 

Psych – Psychologist                                           SLPA – Speech Language Pathology Assistant

SDC – Special Day Class                                     OT – Occupational Therapist

ILC – Intensive Learning Center                             PT – Physical Therapist

EdS – Educational Specialist                                 APE – Adaptive Physical Education Teacher

EdSI – Educational Specialist Intern                       DHH – Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist

SLP – Speech-Language Pathologist                       VI – Visually Impaired

 

Special Education Paraprofessionals

Full-time Aides

Adult Assistants

Behavior Intervention (BII)

1

10

2

 

Special Education Staffing Update:

FPC does not plan to hire additional special education staff for the 2018-2019 school year. The following changes will occur:

- One Education Specialist Intern will transfer to Probationary Status

- We will select a Special Education Lead Teacher

- We will contract Direct Ed, as needed, to cover psychologist needs until Tiffany Crawford returns from maternity leave in October

 

Additional Information Regarding FPC’s Special Education Program

FPC is unique in the service it provides to students with special needs. The school has 69 students, or 9%, identified with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). In addition to the information above, it is important to understand that due to the age of the students at FPC, an average of 70-100 Student Study Team (SST) meetings are held in one school year. Also, FPC has approximately 20-25 Initial Assessments throughout the year as a result of SST meetings and parent or teacher requests. 

 

Student Reorganization: FPC has completed placements for students with special needs and retention. The school is in the process of placing all students and finalizing rosters for next school year.

 

Professional Development (PD) on Foundational Skills: FPC teachers had their 2nd PD on foundational skills on May 27th. The focus of this was to follow-up on the various types of assessments and placement of students for intervention.

 

Open House: FPC’s TK and Kindergarten classes had their Open House on April 26. It was a successful evening having only these classes on campus. Over 200 families visited classrooms and enjoyed teacher and student presentations in the classrooms. FPC will host Open House for 1st grade on May 23rd and for 2nd grade on May 24th

 

School Nutrition Plus and the Alphabet Train: On May 3rd FPC received a visit from the Alphabet Train. The Alphabet Train is a buffet like set-up for student lunch, which includes a fruit or vegetable for every letter of the alphabet. Some fruits and vegetables are combined to create salads. As part of our Wellness Plan, FPC students reviewed healthy eating and healthy choices with specific lessons in the classrooms. Teachers encouraged students to try as many fruits and vegetables as possible on May 3rd. It was a great success and the students found it to be interesting and exciting.

 

Teacher Appreciation Week: The week of May 7th FPC celebrated teachers, TAs, the school nurse and administrators. It was an exciting event with many fun activities. Most importantly appreciation was shared and sprits were lifted.

 

Environmental Defenders: On April 20th FPC students attended an assembly provided by Environmental Defenders, which focuses taking care of our environment. Students learned about caring for our environment by placing trash in its proper place and finding ways to reduce pollution. This annual presentation is always very engaging for all students.

 

Upcoming Events:

May 23             Open House for 1st Grade 5:00 p.m.

May 24           Open House for 2nd grade 5:00 p.m.

June 15          Last Day of School

June 21          FCPS Board Meeting – Last Meeting of 2017-2018

 

 

Item II.E.4.

FENTON STEM ACADEMY (STEM) 

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton STEM Academy: Elementary Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math is successful student engagement and achievement through the implementation of a curriculum that interconnects science, technology, engineering, and math across all disciplines, including art, music, language arts and social studies. 

 

State Charter Number:  1605

 

Enrollment 

 

 

 

Kinder

 

1st

 

2nd

 

3rd

 

4th

 

5th

 

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

5/17/18

45

42

21

43

78

70

299

96.8%

97.5%

 

 

 

special education

 

Fenton STEM Academy operates an inclusive special education program with comprehensive services provided by high quality staff members. The following information describes the varied eligibilities, service providers, and hiring needs for 2018-2019 in the area of Special Education.

 

47 total SWD         15.7% Special Education students        12.7% Mod/Severe

 

At STEM 15.7% of the total population have been identified as Students with Disabilities(SWD).  Of the 47 students currently with IEP’s, 12.7% are considered to have Moderate/Severe needs.

 

Student Eligibilities

SLI

SLD

ED

OHI

ID

AUT

HOH

VI

5

23

1

13

0

5

0

0

 

SLI – Speech Language Impairment                ID – Intellectual Disability      

SLD – Specific Learning Disability                  AUT – Autism

ED – Emotional Disturbance                            HOH – Hard of Hearing

OHI – Other Health Impairment                       VI – Visual Impairment

 

The following table indicates the number of service providers at Fenton STEM Academy. For service providers that are contracted or employed for a portion of the week, a decimal is utilized to indicate the percentage of service provided. For example, Adapted PE is offered one day per week or 20% (.2) of a full week.

 

Service Providers/Teachers

Psych

SDC/

ILC

EdS

EdSI

SLP

SLPA

OT

PT

APE

DHH

VI

Couns

ERICS

RBT

.6

0

1.5

0

.2c

.2c

.2c

0

.2c

.2c

0

.2c

0

.2

 

PSYCH – Psychologist

SDC – Special Day Class                        SLPA – Speech Language Pathology Assistant

ILC – Intensive Learning Center                                  OT – Occupational Therapist

EdS – Educational Specialist                            PT – Physical Therapist

EdSI – Educational Specialist Intern                APE – Adaptive Physical Education Teacher

SLP – Speech-Language Pathologist                DHH – Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist

Couns – Counselor                                           ERICS – Counselor/Psychologist

c- Contracted                                                   RBT- Registered Behavior Technician

 

Special Education Paraprofessionals

 

SPED AIDE

Adult Assistant

Behavior Interventionist (BII)

.5

4

1

 

Special Education Staffing Update:

 

Fenton STEM Academy plans to hire the following special education staff members for the 2018-2019 school year:

 

.5 Speech and Language Pathologist

.5 School Psychologist

.5 Education Specialist

.5 Registered Behavior Technician

1-2 Adult Assistants

 

INSTRUCTION

 

Focus Leads for 2018-2019: Fenton STEM Academy will offer a fully integrated STEM program as the 2019-2024 STEM charter petition is fully implemented in August 2018. Focus Leads will be key in maintaining a clear and defined instructional focus for Fenton STEM Academy. After reviewing the Focus Lead applicants, the Fenton STEM Academy Focus Lead Committee supported the placement of Kelley Christenson (current 1st grade STEM lead teacher) and Elisa Vallejo (current 5th grade STEM teacher) to hold the positions of Focus Lead for the 2018-2019 school year. Staff took part in an online vote of confidence on May 9th and the candidates were unanimously approved at the May 10th Personnel Committee meeting. Congratulations to Ms. Christenson and Mrs. Vallejo as they embark on this new and exciting role. We look forward to supporting their work as they strive to align NGSS implementation across TK-5th grade, enhance our computer science focus, and build upon our STEM learning model.

 

May Professional Development:  Fenton STEM Academy will host our final day of professional development for the 2017-2018 school year on May 25th. Staff will participate in an active shooter drill led by the Los Angeles Police Department. Additional time will be provided during the day for grade level planning and collaboration for end of year tasks. Thank you to Crissy Ismail for her assistance in securing this highly anticipated training.

 

3rd Annual STEM Expo/Open House: Fenton STEM Academy hosted our 3rd annual STEM Expo/Open House on May 4th. The event was well attended and included demonstrations from our 5th grade robotics teams, as well as a presentation from NASA JPL. Student projects showcased evidence of higher order thinking and problem solving skills for real-world challenges. Our 3-D printer was on display to showcase its use for student projects. Students were provided a stamp card, which encouraged visitation to each area of the Expo. Completed stamp cards were turned in the following day in return for a STEM Expo pencil. Feedback was extremely positive for this fun and informative event. Thank you to our hard working staff for a very successful night centered on STEM education and showcasing the yearlong efforts of our incredible students. Families expressed their astonishment and gratitude.

 

State Assessments: Fenton STEM Academy students are nearing completion of all state mandated assessments. Physical Fitness Testing has been completed and submitted to the state for all fifth grade students. Fifth graders completed the CAST science field test on May 10th. In addition, third and fourth graders have finished SBAC testing. Fifth grade will continue until May 24th. The students were well-prepared and showed great perseverance and determination to do their very best. Thank you to our teachers for preparing our students throughout this past year. Thank you to our technology specialist, Cedric Ramirez, for ensuring technology was equipped, organized, and ready to administer the online tests. Testing has gone extremely well and we look forward to receiving positive results in the coming month.

 

SCHOOL COMMUNITY

 

Fourth Grade Sacramento Field Trip: Fenton STEM Academy fourth graders traveled to Sacramento May 10-11th. Students had the opportunity to visit the Capitol building, enjoy a river cruise down the Sacramento River, explore Marshall Gold Discovery State Park, and visit the Gold Bug mine. Thank you to Crissy Ismail, Paige Piper, and Shannon Miranda for their willingness to organize and plan this wonderful trip for our students.

 

25th Annual Kids Ocean Day/Adopt-A-Beach Clean Up: Third grade students from the Academies will participate in the 25th Annual Kids Ocean Day event on May 24, 2018 at Dockweiler Beach. Thousands of elementary students across Southern California gather on this day to raise awareness for coastal environmental concerns. The day includes a massive clean up of trash and debris along the coast, as well as an aerial photo involving the formation of student bodies to form a giant human wave on the sand. We are proud to support this great organization and encourage our students to advocate for a plastic-free ocean.

 

Semester Award Assemblies: Fenton STEM Academy parents have been invited to attend Semester Award Assemblies June 4th- 8th. Awards will be given to students that have demonstrated achievement in overall academics, improvement, citizenship, STEM proficiency, and attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Events:

 

  • May 17-24 Fifth grade SBAC testing
  • May 23 Discovery Dome Planetarium Experience
  • May 24 Third grade field trip (Dockweiler Beach – Coastal Clean Up)
  • May 25 PD Day #7 – Active Shooter Drill & EOY Planning
  • June 1 Fifth grade field trip (CA Science Center)
  • June 4-8 Semester Awards Assemblies
  • June 8 Fifth Grade Picnic
  • June 11 Fifth Grade Luncheon
  • June 13 John Hancock Day – Fifth Grade
  • June 15 Last Day of the School Year
 

Item II.E.5.

FENTON CHARTER LEADERSHIP ACADEMY (FCLA)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Leadership Academy is to nurture the development of responsible, thoughtful citizens in an increasingly interdependent global society by creating environments in which students are challenged to explore, to create, and to make decisions while actively participating in and being accountable for their learning. 

 

State Charter Number:  1613

 

ENROLLMENT, RECRUITMENT AND ATTENDANCE

Dates

TOTAL

Enrollment

Monthly

ADA %

Cumulative ADA%

September

287

98.04

98.04

October

287

96.64

97.34

November

December

288

288

96.48

97.22

97.05

97.09

January

291

95.41

96.76

February

March

288

288

97.03

95.72

96.80

96.93

April

287

95.00

96.44

 

2018-2019 Student Recruitment

The Academies held a second student recruitment event at the Bargain Market Grocery Outlet on April 21st. Teachers joined the administration to set up a booth in front of the market to pass out enrollment packets and answer questions about the school.  We also offered on-the-spot school tours for interested families.

 

On Saturday, June 9th, the Academies will hold a second recruitment event at the Tierra del Sol Foundation Farmer’s Market.  The large response we received at our last visit to the Farmer’s Market prompted Tierra del Sol to invite the Academies again.   

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

FCLA has a thriving special education program with the following eligibilities, service providers, and special education paraprofessionals:

 

44 total Students with Disabilities        15.7% Special Education       19.7% Moderate/Severe

 

At FCLA, 15.7% of the total population have been identified as Students with Disabilities (SWD).  Of the 44 students currently with IEP’s, 19.7% are considered to have Moderate/Severe needs.

 

Student Eligibilities

 

SLI

SLD

ED

OHI

ID

AUT

HOH

VI

18

8

1

10

1

6

0

0

 

SLI – Speech Language Impairment ID – Intellectual Disability 

SLD – Specific Learning Disability AUT – Autism

ED – Emotional Disturbance HOH – Hard of Hearing

OHI – Other Health Impairment VI – Visual Impairment

 

The following table indicates the number of service providers at FCLA. For service providers that are contracted or employed for a portion of the week, a decimal is utilized to indicate the percentage of service provided. For example, Adapted PE is offered one day per week or 20% (.2) of a full week.

 

Service Providers/Teachers

 

PSYCH

SDC/

ILC

EdS

EdSI

SLP

SLPA

OT

PT

APE

DHH

VI

Couns

ERICS

 

RBT

.6

0

1.5

0

.2c

.2c

.2c

.1

.2

.2c

0

.2c

.2c

.2

 

PSYCH – Psychologist

SDC – Special Day Class SLPA – Speech Language Pathology Assistant

ILC – Intensive Learning Center OT – Occupational Therapist

EdS – Educational Specialist PT – Physical Therapist

EdSI – Educational Specialist Intern APE – Adaptive Physical Education Teacher

SLP – Speech-Language Pathologist DHH – Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist

Couns – Counselor ERICS – Counselor/Psychologist

c- Contracted RBT-  Registered Behavior Technician

 

Special Education Paraprofessionals

 

SPED AIDE

Adult Assistant

Behavior Interventionist (BII)

.5

4

5

 

Special Education Staffing Update

 

FCLA plans to hire the following special education staff members for the 2018-2019 school year:

ï .5 Educational Specialist

ï .5 Speech and Language Pathologist

ï .5 Registered Behavior Technician

ï .5 School Psychologist

ï Additional paraprofessional positions as needed

 

INSTRUCTION

 

Leadership Focus – 2nd Grade Animal Shelter Donations/3rd Grade Classroom Presentation

On Tuesday, May 1st, our 2nd grade teachers delivered 3 car-loads of donations collected from all grades to the Burbank Animal Shelter, including toys the students made for the shelter’s dogs and cats.  The shelter was quite grateful for the large delivery.  Thank you to the teachers and students that helped promote this effort.

 

On Friday, April 13th our 3rd grade welcomed the Fuentes and Alcedo Family’s to FCLA for a presentation to our 3rd grade students focusing on the commonalities we share with those that may look or act different than us.  Thank you to Mrs. Fuentes and Mrs. Quijano for the extraordinary work they’ve done this year partnering with Totally Kids to provide their students with experiences that will be crucial to their continued development as upstanding, open minded citizens in the 21st century.

 

Focus Leads for the 2018-2019 School Year

To assist in the continued development of the Leadership Academy’s objective to strengthen the instructional and social emotional skills of our students, the Leadership Academy will introduce the Focus Lead position with the renewal of our Charter Petition (2019-2024).  On May 8th, our Focus Lead Committee made up of the Personnel Committee Chair, Instruction Committee Chair, FCLA Faculty Representative, and Director received applications from nominated staff members at FCLA.  Applicants were required to have completed two years of successful teaching experience with satisfactory performance evaluations over the last two years.  They were also required to have demonstrated leadership capacity and modeled the characteristics necessary in developing a positive school culture.    

 

The committee supported the placement of Krista Casanova and Kate Hetu as Focus Leads in the 2018-2019 school year for one-year terms.  On May 9th, the staff participated in a vote of confidence, and the positions were finalized on May 10th at our Personnel Committee meeting.  Congratulations to Mrs. Casanova and Ms. Hetu. Their work in these new leadership roles will ensure continued emphasis on the school’s vision and provide an added level of support to teachers and students as the Academy moves forward with its vision into the future.    

 

3rd Grade Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments – May 9th through May 16th

3rd grade’s SBAC testing window has ended.  Students tested from approximately 8:30-10:30am over the course of 6 days.  The teachers and students did an excellent job preparing for and during the administration of the test. We are now focused on completing make-ups for students that may have been absent or needed more time to complete the assessment.  FCLA looks forward to receiving their scores in early June.

 

Thank you to Jennifer Miller, Cedric Ramirez, our Plant Manager, David Valle and his team, and Fernando Martinez and the FCPS Maintenance Team for ensuring all students had access to the assessment and were able to test in an environment conducive to their success.

 

PERSONNEL

 

Teacher Hiring for the New Year

In 2018-2019, FCLA will add a third 3rd grade classroom and two new 4th grade classrooms.  We will also see a current third grade teacher, Cecilia Quijano, become one of our new administrative coordinators.  This has created 4 open teaching positions in the new year. 

 

As presented at our Personnel Committee meeting on May 10th, we are happy to announce that all open positions have been offered to teacher candidates and their placement will soon be finalized pending board approval and processing through our business office.

 

Professional Development Day #7 – May 25th 2018

Thank you to Crissy Ismail from the STEM Academy for helping to plan a very important Active Shooter Training for our teachers on our final day of Professional Development.  This training will be instrumental in strengthening the Academies Safety Plan as we move into the 2018-2019 school year.  On this day, teachers will also meet with their grade levels and be given guidance as we close out the school year.

 

 

 

PARENT ADVOCACY AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

 

Open House on May 4th 2018

FCLA’s Open House was a great success.  Teachers did an extraordinary job preparing classrooms for our families prompting several comments from parents on the school’s welcoming environment and strong work ethic evident from our staff.  On this evening, we were also joined by several families seeking enrollment in the upcoming school year.  All were very pleased. 

 

A special thank you to our incredible custodial and maintenance teams who worked tirelessly to prepare our facility for the evening.

 

Leadership Summit – May 31st from 4:30 – 6:00pm

On May 31st, the Fenton Charter Leadership Academy will hold its first annual Leadership Summit.  The event’s objective is to celebrate the impact our students have had on their community through their work on Service Learning Projects.  Students will present and parents and community members will be encouraged to visit all grade levels and to speak with attendees from the various organizations we partnered with this year.  We look forward to a memorable event and the first of many opportunities to highlight our students as leaders in their community.

 

End of Year Semester Award Assemblies

We are excited to begin preparations for our Semester Award assemblies the week of June 4th.  At these assemblies, students are celebrated in four main categories – Leadership, Academies, Citizenship, and Improvement.  Parents and friends are encouraged to attend to help spotlight the individual successes of their children.

 

 

Upcoming Events

ï May 21st – EOY NWEA MAP Assessments Begin

ï May 25th – Professional Development Day #7 – Active Shooter Training

ï May 31st – FCLA Leadership Summit!

ï June 4th – 8th – Semester Award Assemblies

ï June 15th – Last Day of School

 

 

 

II. F.

 

Executive Director’s Report

 

 

 

Item II.F.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS (FCPS)

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

May 17, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes.

 

 

CCSA:

Budget May Revision Proposes $21.1 Million for Charter Facilities Shortfall

Today, May 11, Governor Jerry Brown released the May Revision to the State Budget proposal for the 2018-19 fiscal year.  The May Revision updates the fiscal projections from when the Governor first released his budget proposal in January. CCSA issued a statement on the May Revision today.

Overall, the May Revision reflects an increase in revenues of $8 billion more than was projected in January.  The Governor proposes that most of these increases be used for one-time purposes and to increase reserves.  Despite the large overall state funding increase, under the funding guarantee of Proposition 98 for schools, the May Revision only projects a minor additional ongoing increase of $68 million in 2018-19 and one-time adjustments to prior years of about $660 million compared to January Budget estimates.

Highlights for charter public schools include a one-time current year increase of $21.1 million to the Charter School Facility Grant Program, bringing total funding for 2017-18 to $133.2 million. Thank you to all the schools who testified before budget committees and sent letters to support this critical funding!  Without this backfill, schools in the program would face an estimated 20% cut to their facilities grants for this year.

The May Revision also retains a base increase for SB 740 grants, however, the increase has been reduced slightly from $28.3 million proposed in January to $24.7 million, for a total base program funding amount of $136.8 million.

Other adjustments for K-12 education include:

ï An increase in the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) funding of an additional $320 million, enough to increase the formula base rates by a total of 3 percent, slightly above the statutory cost of living adjustment. These additional resources build upon the $3 billion provided in the Governor's Budget to fully fund the formula in 2018-19.

ï An additional $286 million for one-time block grants, providing more than $2 billion in total one-time discretionary funding to schools in 2018-19 (about $330 per pupil).

ï An increase to the statewide Cost-of-Living Adjustments from 2.51 percent in the Governor's Budget to 2.71 percent in the May Revision, and $10.6 million to selected categorical programs, including special education, to reflect the COLA change.

 

State:

 

From School Services of California –

 

SBE Adopts Revised ESSA State Plan at Special April Meeting

In a special meeting on Thursday, April 12, 2018, the State Board of Education (SBE) unanimously agreed to submit the state’s revised Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) State Plan to the U.S. Department of Education (ED). SBE and California Department of Education (CDE) staff are confident that this latest version of the plan will be approved by ED after working closely with ED staff over the last several months.

ESSA, which replaced the No Child Left Behind Act in December 2015, requires each state to submit a State Plan detailing how it will use federal dollars in its implementation of standards, assessments, accountability, and assistance programs. California expects to receive approximately $2.4 billion this year in funding through ESSA, which is around 3% of the state’s total education budget. Without an ESSA State Plan approved by ED, these federal funds are at risk of being withheld.

The entire process took two years as SBE and CDE worked to develop California’s State Plan and then deal with ED’s strict interpretation of the law. SBE had originally planned on voting for the revised plan at last month’s meeting, but decided to postpone voting on some of the more challenging items in order to give themselves and the public more time to fully understand the implications of the proposed changes. The delay seemed to pay off as SBE members appeared to be well versed on the changes and had limited questions on the item.

One of the major updates included in the approved plan is the methodology for identifying at least the lowest performing 5% of Title I schools, a requirement under ESSA. Originally, SBE wanted to identify the lowest performing Title I schools within local educational agencies (LEAs) identified for differentiated assistance under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), but ED applied a strict interpretation of the statute and required states to identify individual schools for assistance statewide, independent of their LEA. SBE agreed to staff’s recommendation to use the California School Dashboard to identify the lowest performing Title I schools based on indicators that are:

ï all red

ï all red except one of another color

ï all red or orange

ï totaling five or more with the majority being red

When using fall 2017 Dashboard results, this methodology identifies roughly 6.2% of Title I schools for assistance; however, the ESSA State Plan criteria will be applied to the fall 2018 data, so it is unclear how many schools will be identified under this methodology. Additionally, it’s important to note that two new indicators—Chronic Absenteeism and College/Career—will have performance levels for the first time in the 2018 Dashboard.

Last month there was concern amongst the SBE, as well as the public, that the proposed revisions would move California away from a single coherent accountability system that addresses both state and federal requirements to a bifurcated system where federal accountability is based on proficiency only and state accountability is based on both achievement and improvement. SBE and CDE staff explained that even though ED’s statutory interpretation is that the academic achievement, graduation rate, and English language proficiency indicators must be based on current year data only, they were able to find a way to satisfy ED’s interpretation and still use the “status” and “change” components of the Dashboard in the plan. For purposes of federal reporting, the ESSA State Plan will treat the “status” and “change” components of the Dashboard as separate indicators with “status” as the required indicator and “change” as an additional indicator, keeping the LCFF’s framework intact.

In addition to adopting the revised ESSA State Plan, the SBE also unanimously adopted staff’s recommendation to pursue a waiver of the ESSA statute for the English learner proficiency indicator (ELPI), in order to allow California to maintain its current calculation of the ELPI that includes reclassified students and long-term English learners. The waiver request is necessary since ED’s statutory interpretation is that this indicator may only include students who are English learners in the current school year.

The SBE will officially submit California’s ESSA State Plan the week of April 16, 2018, and is confident that the adopted version keeps its overarching goal of having one cohesive accountability system intact while staying true to the tenets of the LCFF.

The True Cost of Pension Reform

Local educational agencies (LEAs) in the state of California have been grappling with the increasing cost pressures that resulted from the acknowledgement that both the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) and California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) have significant unfunded liabilities. The Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2013 implemented changes in benefits and creditable compensation in an effort to stem increases for new members. However, the unfunded liabilities for current members still placed both plans under significant financial strain.

Employer contribution rates have risen sharply over the last five years and continue to face steep climbs in the future. CalSTRS employer contribution rates are legislatively approved, while CalPERS employer contribution rates are approved each spring by the CalPERS Board. The employer contribution rates are listed in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Effective Employer Contribution Rates

Year

CalSTRS

CalPERS

2013-14

8.250%

11.442%

2014-15

8.880%

11.771%

2015-16

10.730%

11.847%

2016-17

12.580%

13.888%

2017-18

14.447%

15.531%

2018-19

16.280%

18.062%

Assembly Bill (AB) 1469 (Chapter 47, Statutes of 2014), the CalSTRS full funding plan, was passed on the heels of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), a formula that promised a return of purchasing power to LEAs that was lost during the Great Recession. Now that the LCFF is facing full implementation in the 2018-19 fiscal year, it is a good time to take a look at the financial impact of AB 1469 on an LEA’s budget. Based on exhibits from the California Department of Education’s (CDE) website, the commitment to LCFF over its first six years is projected to total nearly $20 billion as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Implementation of Local Control Funding Formula

Year

Increase From Prior Year Due
to Additional Funding

Cumulative Effect

2013-14

$2,067,140,000

$2,067,140,000

2014-15

$4,721,970,000

$6,789,110,000

2015-16

$5,994,417,000

$12,783,527,000

2016-17

$2,941,980,000

$15,725,507,000

2017-18*

$1,362,383,000

$17,087,890,000

2018-19*

$2,900,000,000

$19,987,890,000

*Estimated based on the CDE principal apportionment exhibit and the Governor’s 2018-19 January Budget Proposal

The increase in employer contribution rates for CalSTRS and CalPERS results in an ongoing commitment of more than $2 billion annually as shown in Figure 3. The ongoing commitment represents 11.8% of new ongoing LCFF revenues and assumes no salary increases over a six-year period.

Figure 3: Effect of CalSTRS and CalPERS Rate Changes and No Compensation Increases

Year

Creditable Compensation

Increase From Prior Year Due to Rate Change

Cumulative Effect

2013-14

$30,545,071,431

-

-

2014-15

$30,545,071,431

$170,418,076

 $170,418,076

2015-16

$30,545,071,431

$435,329,137

$605,747,213

2016-17

$30,545,071,431

$579,054,027

$1,184,801,240

2017-18

$30,545,071,431

$553,892,577

$1,738,693,817

2018-19

$30,545,071,431

$610,944,581

$2,349,638,398

Realistically, LEAs have increasing cost pressures on the natural due to step and column increases, as well as pressures from local bargaining units to raise wages for their employees. The combined effect of the increase in creditable compensation and the employer contribution rates represents an ongoing commitment of more than $2.8 billion annually as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4: Effect of CalSTRS and CalPERS Rate Changes and Compensation Increases

Year

Creditable Compensation

Increase From Prior Year Due to Rate Change

Cumulative Effect

2013-14

$30,545,071,431

-

-

2014-15

$32,482,423,566

 $181,682,887

$181,682,887

2015-16

$34,548,885,729

$493,289,429

$674,972,316

2016-17

$35,995,508,209

$682,409,210

$1,357,381,526

2017-18**

$37,266,149,648

$675,734,485

$2,033,116,011

2018-19**

$38,581,644,731

$771,802,053

$2,804,918,065

**Estimated a 1.5% increase for step and column and 2% increase in creditable compensation over previous year’s creditable compensation

The ongoing commitment represents 14% of new ongoing LCFF revenues and equates to approximately $467 per average daily attendance and will only continue to grow as the employer contribution rates continue to rise. It is estimated that by 2020-21, the cumulative impact of the rate increases will total more than $4.1 billion.

LEAs were promised restoration in purchasing power when the LCFF was introduced; however, that promise was short-lived as the additional cost pressures, highlighted by AB 1469, were applied as a dollar-for-dollar reduction in new LCFF revenues. While everyone agrees that funding public pensions is fiscally prudent, it must be recognized that the cost of doing so is high and directly impacts the ability of LEAs to provide services for current students.

New CalPERS School Employer Rates Released

During its meeting on April 17, 2018, the California Public Employees’ Retirement Systems (CalPERS) Board approved the employer contribution of 18.062% for 2018-19, which represents a 2.531% increase over the 2017-18 rate of 15.531%.

CalPERS School Employer Contribution Rates

 

Previous Employer Rates

Updated Employer Rates

2018-19

17.7%

18.062%

2019-20

20.0%

20.8%

2020-21

22.7%

23.5%

2021-22

23.7%

24.6%

2022-23

24.3%

25.3%

2023-24

24.8%

25.8%

2024-25

25.1%

26.0%

The increase in the rates is driven primarily by the lowered expected return on investments, as well as the conversion from a 30-year amortization period to a 20-year amortization period.

In addition to the revised employer contribution rate, CalPERS also raised the employee contribution rates for new members from 6.5% to 7.0% effective July 1, 2018.

CalSTRS Unfunded Liability Increases, Post-PEPRA Member Contribution Rate To Increase

Today, May 10, 2018, the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) Board adopted the latest actuarial valuation of the retirement system. Despite increases in contribution rates by members, employers, and the state, the funded ratio continues to slide, this year dropping from 63.7% to 62.6%, and the unfunded actuarial obligation (UAO or unfunded liability) increased from $96.7 billion to $107.3 billion. 

This valuation reflects the decision made by the CalSTRS Board in February 2017 to assume an investment return of 7% instead of 7.25%, which resulted in an increase of $8.7 billion in the UAO. The UAO also increased by $4.5 billion because the contributions received during 2016-17 were not sufficient to cover the interest on the UAO. According to CalSTRS’s actuary, Milliman, the UAO is expected to continue to grow for the next decade and then start declining.

Changes to the unfunded liability affect the three contributors in different ways.

Employee Contribution Rate

Under the Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA), post-PEPRA employees are required to pay at least one-half the normal cost of their benefits. Based on the valuation presented to the CalSTRS Board, the normal cost did increase by more than 1%, which is the threshold for increasing the post-PEPRA employee contribution rate. Therefore, the contribution rate for post-PEPRA employees (“2% at 62 members”) will increase from 9.205% to 10.205% effective July 1, 2018.

Employer Contribution Rate

Because employer contribution rates are set in statute until 2020-21, there is no immediate effect on the employer contribution rate, which will increase from 14.43% in 2017-18 to 16.280% in 2018-19.

State Contribution Rate

For the second year in a row, the CalSTRS Board has used its authority to adjust the state contribution rate necessary to pay off the state’s portion of the UAO. The state contribution rate can be increased by up to 0.5% annually, bringing the state contribution rate from 6.828% in 2017-18 to 7.328% in 2018-19. Annual increases to the state rate of 0.5% are expected for about five more years according to Milliman.

Report Confirms a Nationwide Increase in the Number of Students With Autism

A report issued by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on April 26, 2018, supports what many local educational agencies (LEAs) have suspected for some time; there is a rise in the number of students identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). LEAs in California have seen increases in the number of students eligible for Special Education for the last decade, even as the overall K-12 student population declines. The CDC has been tracking the prevalence of ASD in the U.S. since 1998. The new estimate reflects an increase of 1.7% (up from one in every 68 children in the 2016 report to one in 59 children in the 2018 report).

The report is based upon the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network’s 2014 data collection. The ADDM provides estimates among children aged 8 years residing within 11 ADDM sites across the U.S. (there are none in California). The data provided through the CDC report states that among 8-year-olds, 1 in 59 has ASD. The ADDM sites represent an estimated 8% of all 8-year-olds in the U.S. and are not considered to be a representative sample of the entire U.S. In California, ASD represents 14% of the overall population of students with disabilities for 2016-17, up from 13% in 2015-16.

LEAs should consider comparing the ADDM site data to their local data as a part of their annual program planning. It is also important to make comparisons to statewide and regional data. Tracking and monitoring data related to the number and types of students served will help the LEA determine when or if it is necessary to create or phase out programs, shed light on the number of students being served with high-cost disabilities, as well as suggest potential areas of over identification.

An Overview of the 2018-19 Governor’s May Revision

Preface

The May Revision represents Governor Jerry Brown’s final State Budget proposal of his four terms as Governor of California. Also, it is the final statutory opportunity for the Governor to update his economic projections prior to enactment of the State Budget in June. Factors such as tax revenues, population growth, and competing state priorities are all detailed in the Governor’s May Revision.

This year, there was positive news in January when the Governor announced his proposal to fully fund the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) in 2018-19, two years earlier than originally planned. He also proposed significant one-time discretionary funds scored against outstanding mandate claims, once again. And the Governor proposed to continue funding Career Technical Education (CTE) grants outside of the LCFF.

In the meantime, current-year state revenue collections through April are approximately $4 billion higher than the January forecast, causing speculation on the impact on K-14 education funding, for both this year and next. Given the Proposition 98 tests that are in play, although the May Revision revenue forecast through 2018-19 is increased by $8 billion, as we expected, the impact to the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee is minor. And, in keeping with the Governor’s funding priorities, the ongoing revenues from the increase are largely used to provide a slight uptick in funding for the LCFF.

Additional one-time revenues generated from an increase in the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee for the current year are used to fund some additional one-time programs, but the most significant is an additional $286 million to the January proposal to provide $1.8 billion in one-time discretionary funds for 2018-19. CTE and Special Education are policy areas that have received more focus in this legislative session than usual; however, the Governor does not make any significant ongoing proposal for Special Education and leaves his January CTE proposal mostly intact.

In this article, we focus on how significant K-12 proposals have changed since January.

Overview of the Governor’s Budget Proposals

Governor Brown’s May Revision paints a bright, but cautious, fiscal picture, noting that the January 2018 State Budget proposal included a healthy reserve and that revenues have continued to grow since. Throughout the current fiscal year, state revenues have outpaced forecasts both before and during the important tax month of April. With this solid revenue base, Governor Brown is proposing a final May Revision that combines both long-term and one-time investments while setting aside funds for a rainy day.

Significant proposals outside of Proposition 98 include:

ï Expanding the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit program to workers between the ages of 18-25 and above 64, and adjusting income limits to reflect the minimum wage increase to $12 per hour in 2019

ï Fully funding the Rainy Day fund to $13.8 billion by the end of 2018-19 and an extra $3.2 billion into the state’s traditional Budget reserve fund

ï Placing the $2 billion “No Place Like Home” bond on the November ballot, which would expand housing opportunities for Californians with mental illness

Finally, the Governor’s May Revision highlights a number of initiatives to combat homelessness, invest in infrastructure, and fight climate change.

The Economy and Revenues

Economic Outlook

Themes from the January Budget that include both good news and recession warnings continue with the Governor’s May Revision. While acknowledging the increased revenues and the economy’s overall strong fiscal health, in his press conference, Governor Brown once again brought out the now familiar charts—one showing that all periods of surplus are followed by years of deficits and the other illustrating that, by the end of 2018-19, the U.S. will have matched the longest recovery in modern history—to emphasize that another recession is just around the corner. While the May Revision assumes the continued expansion of the economy, it is founded on prudent fiscal policies—building the state’s reserves and avoiding substantial new ongoing obligations.

The full implications of the new federal tax law are still unknown and actions by the federal government could have an outsized effect on California’s economy. While the federal tax changes are providing a temporary boost to the national and California economies, there are long-term consequences that could affect future economic growth. In addition, even a moderate recession could severely impact the state’s revenues for several years to come as capital gains—the state’s most volatile revenue source—make up the largest share of personal income tax receipts.

The national unemployment rate as of March 2018 held steady at 4.1% while California’s unemployment rate held at 4.3%—tying the record low set in February 2018. However, stock market volatility appears to be back in play after record breaking increases.

State Revenues

While revenue projections are once again up as part of the May Revision compared to the Governor’s January Budget, unlike in previous years, this is not translating into a windfall for education. Personal income tax revenues have been revised up almost $4.4 billion due to the strong stock market, higher wages, and stronger concentration of income among high-income earners. Sales tax receipts and corporation tax revenues have also been revised up by $744 million and $2.5 billion, respectively. Total General Fund revenues are up $1.3 billion in 2016-17, $3.5 billion in 2017-18, and $3.1 billion in 2018-19 compared to the January estimates. The average year-over-year growth from 2016-17 through 2021-22 is projected to be 4.1%, with total General Fund revenues increasing from $128.6 billion in the current year to $145.9 billion in 2021-22.

As noted, the May Revision does not anticipate a recession, but acknowledges and plans for economic risks. The U.S. real gross domestic product growth is projected at 3% in 2018 and 2019, but falling to 1.9% starting in 2020.

Proposition 98

As expected, the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee remains relatively flat from the Governor’s Budget despite the significant infusion of state General Fund revenues. The May Revision increases the minimum guarantee by a total of $727 million for fiscal years 2016-17 through 2018-19 ($252 million in 2016-17, $407 million in 2017-18, and $68 million in 2018-19), attributing the growth largely to increases to General Fund revenues and projected per capita personal income for 2018-19. The 2018-19 minimum guarantee is increased to $78.4 billion from $78.3 billion proposed in the January Budget. The May Revision changes the operative test for 2018-19 from Test 3—funding based on per capita General Fund revenue growth, plus 0.5%—to Test 2—funding based on changes in per capita personal income, which precludes the creation of a maintenance factor.

Of note, the Governor proposes a new Proposition 98 minimum guarantee certification process. The minimum guarantee is currently required to be jointly certified by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Community College Chancellor, and the Department of Finance (DOF) nine months after the close of the fiscal year. However, according to the Administration, the last time the minimum guarantee was certified was for fiscal year 2008-09. Instead, the May Revision proposes an alternative process whereby the DOF will publish a final calculation of the prior-year minimum guarantee, inclusive of its factors, with the May Revision, triggering a public comment period. If there are no challenges, the certification becomes final by October 1. Any funding provided above the minimum guarantee may be used as credit toward future minimum guarantee obligations and any amount owed would be paid over a specified period.

Cost-of-Living Adjustment and Average Daily Attendance

The May Revision includes a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for many K-12 education programs, including the LCFF. The statutory COLA for K-12 education is based on the annual average percentage change in value of the federally maintained Implicit Price Deflator for state and local governments and is calculated to be 2.71% for the 2018-19 fiscal year, a slight increase from the 2.51% estimated in January. For the LCFF, the Governor proposes a modest augmentation above the statutory COLA, bringing the total to a 3.00% increase to the LCFF base grant target rates. Those programs outside of the LCFF will receive the statutory 2.71% COLA.

With full funding of the LCFF targets proposed to be reached with the 2018-19 Budget, the COLA will have a more direct impact on the LCFF funding received by most local educational agencies (LEAs) compared to during the implementation phase when COLAs were applied to the LCFF target.

Programs outside the LCFF, including Special Education, Child Nutrition, Foster Youth, Preschool, American Indian Education Centers, and American Indian Early Childhood Education, will receive the statutory COLA of 2.71%.

Average daily attendance (ADA) for the upcoming fiscal year is expected to remain flat. However, as a result of an increased ADA in 2016-17, LCFF funding for school districts, county offices of education (COEs), and charter schools under the LCFF will increase by $46.8 million in 2017-18 and by $42.6 million in 2018-19.

Local Control Funding Formula

The Governor’s 2018-19 May Revision continues the Governor’s intent of fully funding the LCFF in the budget year with an increase of approximately $3.2 billion, up almost $300 million from the January State Budget proposal. The additional funding includes the increased COLA as well as provides a modest augmentation to the formula.

LCFF Target Entitlements for School Districts and Charter Schools

The LCFF provides funding to transition all school districts and charter schools toward target funding levels and provides supplemental and concentration grants to increase or improve services for students who are not English language proficient, who are from low-income families, or who are in foster care.

The target base grants by grade span for 2018-19 increase by the combined statutory COLA of 2.71% and additional LCFF funding for a total increase of 3.00%, an upward adjustment from January’s 2.51% COLA estimate.

Grade Span

2017-18 Target
Base Grant Per ADA

3.00% Increase*

2018-19 Target
Base Grant Per ADA

TK-3

$7,193

$216

$7,409

4-6

$7,301

$219

$7,520

7-8

$7,518

$226

$7,744

9-12

$8,712

$261

$8,973

*Combined statutory COLA of 2.71% and additional LCFF funding

The 2018-19 Transitional Kindergarten (TK)-3 grade span adjustment (GSA) for class-size reduction (CSR) is also 3.00% higher from 2017-18 at $771 per ADA, as well as the grade 9-12 GSA at $233 per ADA, in recognition of the need for CTE courses provided to students in the secondary grades.

In addition to the base grants, school districts and charter schools are entitled to supplemental increases equal to 20% of the adjusted base grant (which includes CSR and CTE funding) for the percentage of enrolled students who are English learners, eligible for the free and reduced-price meals program, or in foster care (the unduplicated pupil percentage). An additional 50% per-pupil increase is provided as a concentration grant for the percentage of eligible students enrolled beyond 55% of total enrollment.

LCFF Transition Entitlements and Gap Funding

The difference between an LEA’s current funding and its target entitlement is called the LCFF gap, and it is this gap that is funded with the additional dollars dedicated each year to implementation of the LCFF. For 2018-19, the Governor’s Budget proposes to move from 97% implemented to fully close the LCFF funding gap—two years ahead of the intended 2020-21 implementation date.

The table below shows the DOF’s LCFF gap percentages through 2018-19:

District and Charter School LCFF Funding and Gap Closure
(Dollars in Millions)

 

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

LCFF Funding

$4,722

$5,994

$2,942

$1,362

$3,160

Gap Closure %

30.16%

52.56%

56.08%

45.17%

100.00%

COLA

0.85%

1.02%

0.00%

1.56%

3.00%*

*Statutory COLA plus proposed augmentation

Pupil transportation and Targeted Instructional Improvement Grants continue as separate add-ons to the LCFF allocations and do not receive a COLA.

The Administration also proposes to continuously appropriate funding for LCFF and the annual COLA.

Fiscal Transparency

The Governor’s Budget cited expressed concerns about the direct services being provided to the students that generate LCFF dollars. The Governor’s May Revision expands the January Budget proposal by requiring LEAs to show how supplemental grants increase and improve services for high-need students and including parent-friendly, graphical representations of information, when possible.

County Offices of Education

COEs receive funding under a similar funding formula, with funding provided in recognition of direct instructional services for pupils in juvenile court schools and community schools and an allocation for countywide services based on the number of school districts and total ADA within the county. As of 2014-15, the LCFF for COEs is fully implemented and, therefore, LCFF increases for COEs in 2018-19 are provided through the estimated COLA only, with COEs that are at their LCFF target receiving a 2.71% increase. COEs that are more than 2.71% above their LCFF target will receive no additional funding through the formula in the budget year.

Special Education

The Governor’s May Revision continues to provide only modest funding for Special Education programs. In addition to increasing the statutory COLA to 2.71%, the Governor continues to propose $100 million in one-time funding for programs to increase and retain Special Education teachers.

The May Revision sustains $10 million in ongoing funding for Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs) to work with COEs in providing technical assistance to LEAs focused on improving the academic outcomes of students with disabilities as part of the statewide system of support, and continues to propose $167 million to establish an “Inclusive Education Expansion Program” for children ages 0 to 5, to improve school readiness and long-term academic outcomes for low-income children and children with exceptional needs.

The May Revision continues to include proposals that revise Special Education budget transparency and accountability by requiring SELPAs to complete a SELPA local plan template that aligns the services and resources noted in the local plan with the goals identified in their member districts’ Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs) and to summarize how a SELPA’s planned expenditures and services align with the improved student outcome strategies noted in the SELPA’s plan.

In January, the Governor proposed $100 million in one-time funding for Teacher Workforce Development targeted to Special Education teacher preparation, $50 million to support locally sponsored Special Education teacher preparation programs, and $50 million in competitive grants to develop or expand locally identified solutions to the Special Education teacher shortage. There are no changes to the Special Education teacher workforce development proposals in the May Revision. 

Child Care and State Preschool

The May Revision proposes modest, largely technical, adjustments to Governor Jerry Brown’s January Budget proposals for Child Care and the State Preschool program. It retains the Governor’s proposals to increase provider reimbursement rates and full-day state preschool slots for LEAs, fulfilling a three-year agreement he made with the Legislature. New with the release of the May Revision is a one-time $11.8 million proposal to increase federal funds to support an Early Math Initiative to provide early math resources, such as professional development and coaching opportunities for teachers, as well as provide early math learning opportunities for preschool and kindergarten children.

The May Revision increases California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids investments by $104 million to reflect changes in the caseload and the cost of care. Finally, as a result of the slight increase in COLA estimated in January, child care and preschool investments increase by $4 million.

Discretionary Funds

The Governor’s May Revision proposes more than $2 billion in one-time discretionary funds for LEAs, which equates to approximately $344 per ADA. This is an increase of $286 million to the $1.8 billion proposed in January. Like prior years, these funds would be available for expenditure at the discretion of LEAs and would be used to offset LEAs’ outstanding mandate reimbursement claims on a dollar-for-dollar basis. The 2018-19 State Budget Summary notes that this infusion, coupled with past years’ payments, reduces the outstanding amount owed to LEAs for mandates to $972 million.

School Facilities and Proposition 39

Despite calls to sell more school bonds to address the backlog of school construction projects that are waiting for state matching grants, the May Revision makes no significant changes to the Governor’s Budget proposal to issue $640 million in Proposition 51 bonds in fiscal year 2018-19. 

The 2017-18 Budget Act included provisions to expend unencumbered Proposition 39 (2012) funds to support school bus retrofit or replacements, low- or no-cost energy loans, and a competitive grant program to fund energy efficiency or generation projects. The California Energy Commission has initiated public input on these programs.

Federal Programs

At the May Revision, the Governor reiterates that California’s relationship with the federal government has never been more uncertain, noting actions of the federal government “could easily overwhelm the state’s fiscal capacity.” The Governor notes that the increasing federal deficit “caused by the tax bill will also create more pressure for the federal government to cut spending programs through rescissions or some other mechanism.”

In March 2018, President Donald Trump signed the fiscal year 2018 spending bill that increased funding for Every Student Succeeds Act (Title I) and Special Education by nearly $300 million nationally for each program.

Career Technical Education

The Governor’s May Revision continues to include $200 million in ongoing funding to establish a K-12 specific component of the community college-administered Strong Workforce Program. The May Revision amends the Governor’s January proposal to clarify elements of the program, including:

ï Clarifies that the grant decisions for the K-12 component will be made exclusively by the K-12 Selection Committee established under the proposal

ï Clarifies the requirements that apply to the new K-12 component of the Strong Workforce Program (language is not yet available)

ï Builds a new role for the Technical Assistance Providers established under the California Career Pathways Trust Program, and further clarifies roles and responsibilities of the Workforce Pathway Coordinators

ï Provides additional resources to consortia for administering the regional grant process, including resources to support the K-12 Selection Committee duties

System of Support

The May Revision retains the Governor’s January Budget investments to build a state infrastructure to support local continuous improvement efforts. Specifically, the Governor’s Budget included a $55.2 million investment for COEs to work with LEAs under their jurisdiction that are identified for differentiated support per the new California School Dashboard. The Governor also proposed $4 million to provide eight competitive grants to COEs to serve as lead agencies to provide resources, training, and support to other COEs in their roles as differentiated support providers. The May Revision retains these proposed investments.

New with the May Revision are proposals to improve community engagement and school climate as LEAs continue to enhance local practices around the LCAP development and adoption. To this end, the Governor proposes a $13.3 million one-time investment, under the system of support, to create the Community Engagement Initiative intended to build the capacity of LEAs to effectively engage their communities with an eye toward improving student outcomes. Additionally, the Administration proposes a one-time $15 million investment to expand the Multi-Tiered Systems of Support to improve school climate through programs such as positive behavioral interventions and support, restorative justice, social and emotional learning, bullying prevention, trauma-informed practice, and cultural competency. These additional investments are part of and compliment the Governor’s January system of support proposals.

Finally, the May Revision includes a $5 million increase for the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence to cover estimated costs of services in 2018-19.

Charter Schools

For charter schools, in addition to the increased COLA (2.71%) applied to the LCFF and additional one-time funding, the Charter School Facility Grant Program is increased in 2017-18 by $21.1 million and then reduced in 2018-19 by $3.6 million to align available funding with program participation.

In Closing

While the Governor notes that we are in the second longest economic recovery on record and we are overdue for a recession, his forecasts do not include any potential effects of the next recession. California is now the fifth largest economy in the world based on gross domestic product. And even though California imposes a relatively high tax burden on its taxpayers, its resources committed to educating our youth still lag behind most states in our country, even states without the high revenue profile that California enjoys. And, even with full funding of the initial targets for the LCFF, the original goal was merely to restore the purchasing power that K-12 education had in 2007-08. This has become a fallacy as much of the restored funding has been absorbed by the increases in pension contributions.

Further, California’s reliance on the volatile income tax, made even more so by the continued reliance on capital gains from the top 1% of earners, means that funding for public education is highly sensitive to economic and personal income fluctuations as compared with that of other states. The Governor referred to this volatility in his May Revision remarks: “How do you ride the tiger?” Until something changes, it seems that California is destined to have higher volatility and lower levels of funding than other states for public education.

All in all, the May Revision is slightly better for public education than the January Budget, but given the automatic cost increases LEAs are facing, it’s a significant challenge to merely maintain current programs, let alone augment them. In fact, many LEAs are making budget reductions. We continue to believe that the best plan of action is to maintain a suitable level of local reserves, exercise caution at the bargaining table, and prepare budgets and projections on a reasonably conservative basis. This is especially true as there will be a new person in the Governor’s office and in other key state policy positions come next year.

Estimates of Out-Year COLAs Now Available

Along with the Governor’s 2018-19 May Revision, the Department of Finance has released revised estimates of the statutory cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) after 2018-19. The table below illustrates the COLAs along with the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) gap funding in each year:

 

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

Statutory COLA

1.56%

2.71%
(3% for LCFF)

2.57%

2.67%

LCFF Gap Funding %

45.17%

100.00%

To assist you in preparing your LEA’s multi-year projections, we will be updating SSC’s Financial Projection Dartboard and LCFF Simulator in the coming days to reflect this latest information. Stay tuned…

District:

 

On May 1, 2018, the Los Angeles Board of Education, on a 5-2 vote, selected Austin Beutner as the new Superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District.

 

FCPS:

 

SB 740 applications were submitted for FPC, FCLA and STEM on May 2, 2018 for the 2018-2019 school year.  Although the reimbursement for facilities costs is not fully funded, it does provide funding for our schools on non-district sites and is essential for their long-term fiscal health.

 

 

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items.

 

 

 

Item III. A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve software, instructional materials and resources and communication tools for all sites

 

BACKGROUND

 

There are a number of software site licenses, other instructional materials and resources, and communication tools that all the Fenton sites utilize on a regular basis.  Prior to the start of the school year, the tech staff works to have all licenses updated and signed to ensure that all necessary upgrades and information are in place.

 

ANALYSIS

 

iStation is an Internet based software tool that Fenton has used since being introduced to the program through the Riordan Foundation in 2008.  The introduction led to the necessity to upgrade all computers and then the leasing, rather than purchasing, of computers.  The partnership with the Riordan Foundation was very beneficial as Fenton did not pay for the site license for a number of years, and even later, received a significant discount.  The company was purchased from the original owners, a father and son partnership, and we now pay full price.

 

BrightArrow is the automated notification system the Fenton schools utilize to send out messages to parents via the telephone.  The tool has been effective in communicating emergency closures, changes in schedules, attendance calls, informational messages, and reminders via a phone blast to all 3,200 students. 

 

The other materials listed on the attached list reflect the variety of programs utilized by site and the related costs.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the contracts and expenditures presented here to maintain continuity and ongoing use of communication, management and instructional tools for the Fenton

 

Item III. B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve 2018-2019 calendars

 

BACKGROUND

 

At the January 25, 2018 meeting of the Board of Directors, the 2018-2019 Instructional Calendar was approved.

 

ANALYSIS

 

Three additional calendars, which identify workdays for employees other than teachers, have been developed by Richard Parra, Director of the Fenton Primary Center, and were reviewed by the Directors of the Fenton schools.  The additional calendars are for those who follow a 201-day calendar (School Psychologists, Speech Therapists, Elementary School Counselors, and the Registered Behavior Technician), a 224-day calendar (administrators and certain school-based office staff), and a 249-day calendar (custodians, maintenance, and business office staff responsible for maintaining and caring for  individual school sites, accounts payable, payroll, personnel, and technology, respectively).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the 201, 224 and 249-day calendars for 2018-2019.

 

 

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

 

 

Item IV.A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve adoption of Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) California Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual to supplement FCPS General Accounting Manual

 

BACKGROUND

 

The FCMAT California Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual is intended to be a comprehensive guide to charter school accounting policies and procedures, and a reference for other valuable financial and accounting resources.  FCMAT recognizes the increasing demands on charter school leaders, and the manual is designed to help leaders meet them while maintaining fiscal accountability, transparency and accuracy.

 

ANALYSIS

 

After a careful review of the FCMAT manual by the Executive Director and the Ad Hoc Finance Committee, the committee agreed that utilizing the manual to further define FCPS’ fiscal operations would be in the best interests of the organization.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the following:

 

The Governing Board of the Fenton Charter Public Schools adopts, on an ongoing basis, the most recent Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) California Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual to supplement the FCPS General Accounting Policies and Procedures Manual.  In the event of any conflict between the most recent FCMAT Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual and the Fenton Charter Public School’s accounting policies and procedures, the Fenton Charter Public School’s

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve revised General Accounting Policies and Procedures Manual

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools have maintained documented accounting policies and procedures since the conversion of Fenton Avenue Charter School.

 

ANALYSIS

 

As the organization has grown, additional procedures and regular clarifications and updating of policies have become necessary.   The following areas have been added, revised or further clarified

 

ï Additional clarification on use of credit cards by selected administrators and management level personnel;

ï Additional detail related to reconciliation of credit card expenditures;

ï Revised procedures for creation of purchase orders;

ï Adoption of the FCMAT California Charter School Accounting and Best Practices Manual to supplement FCPS accounting policies and procedures (Item IV.A.).

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the revised General Accounting Policies and Procedures Manual.

 

 

 

Item IV.C.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve salary schedules for all employees

 

BACKGROUND

 

Since converting to independent charter status, Fenton Avenue Charter School has continued to use the services of the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) for payroll and accounts payable.  Remaining with LACOE over the past twenty-five years has provided not only a reliable payroll and accounting system, but has also ensured that STRS and PERS calculations and contributions for all employees who are members of these pension plans have been correct. 

 

As a charter management organization with five schools, Fenton is now viewed as a district and as such, salary schedules are required for all positions.

 

ANALYSIS

 

Salary schedules for nearly all certificated staff have been maintained, but not for classified staff.  We have adhered to guidelines and regulations to ensure equity, but did not have schedules aligned with specific job titles, job descriptions, qualifications, work year or hours.  As a “district,” we must now have salary schedules for every position, which take all of these items into consideration.

 

First, to complete the certificated schedule, a State Preschool Teachers’ Schedule was created to closely align with the authorizing district’s Early Education schedule.  Schedules for administrators and other certificated staff were developed over the past six years, and are shared here, as well as the Teacher Salary Schedule, which has been revised continually to reflect salary adjustments since 1993.

 

For classified employees, the variety of hourly rates and annual salaries were reviewed and schedules created to align with the nature of each job.  Job titles falling into the “salaried” schedule identify those who are “exempt”.  Typically, these employees supervise other employees, work with confidential information and at an administrative/executive level.  “Non-exempt” employees are “hourly”.  Exempt employees do not receive overtime pay, unless approved by the Director; non-exempt employees are paid for overtime when approved by the Director or Administrative Designee to work beyond their regular hours or work days.

 

The schedules reflect entry-level placement (the minimum rate at the time of hire, and for these newly created schedules, as of July 1, 2018) as well as regular increases to hourly or annual rates, which are indicted by “STEPs”. 

 

For each job category, there is also a maximum rate, which similar to the minimum rate, is aligned to the responsibilities of the job.  In a number of cases, minimum levels have been increased for this initial schedule to prepare for future new hires, and will not match where some employees started on the salary schedule.  Once at the maximum STEP, the employee will not receive an increase unless a revision to the entire schedule is approved by the Board (e.g., an across-the-board salary increase).

 

STEPs are not to be confused with years of service, as there is no correlation.  Moving to the next STEP is based on the employee’s evaluation in any given year, and if the Board authorizes “STEP” (or in the case of teachers, “STEP and COLUMN”) increases for the new school year.  There is no automatic movement from year to year.  If a STEP increase is authorized by the Board, the employee must also have completed the required number of work days (150 instructional days for teachers; 164 calendared work days for those on the 201-day calendar; 205 work days for those on the 249 day calendar) in order to participate in the move the higher STEP.

 

For this first year of implementation, some employees will experience a slight increase in pay; some will remain at the same rate, but no decrease in the base rate (because they have reached the maximum or are even over the maximum); and a very small number will see a decrease in the base rate (less than $100 a year).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve salary schedules for all certificated and classified employees.

 

 

 

Item IV.D.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve Kaiser Permanente and Health Net for medical benefits for benefited employees

 

BACKGROUND

 

Each year, the Business Manager, Maria Hernandez, and the Executive Director meet with representatives from Kaiser Permanente, Health Net, and our insurance brokers to review proposed increases for the new school year.  If there are any questions or concerns with the proposal, we discuss possible changes in coverage to make the plans affordable for the schools. 

 

Fenton purchases Kaiser Permanente medical insurance directly from Kaiser, and has found this practice to be cost effective and efficient, until their recent change to how rates are determined for groups of 250 or less, which has not been beneficial to Fenton.  Health Net is purchased through an insurance broker.  Delta Dental and VSP are purchased through ASCIP.

 

ANALYSIS

 

Traditionally, Fenton offers two medical plans:  Kaiser and another HMO.  Health Net has been the other choice for a number of years and we will continue to offer these two choices in 2018-2019.

 

Kaiser’s increase is 12.49%, up from the 8% increase last year.  Here are the proposed rates for Kaiser for 2018-19:

 

HMO

$20 Office Visit

2017-2018 Rates

2018-2019 Rates

 

2018-2019

% Change

2018-2019

Annual Cost per Plan

Subscriber only

 

$500.66

$563.19

+12.49%

$6,758.28

Subscriber +1 dependent

$1,001.33

$1,126.39

+12.49%

$13,516.68

Subscriber +2 or more dependents

$1,416.88

$1,593.84

+12.49%

$19,126.08

Health Net’s initial proposed increase was 11%, but after some negotiation, the increase is 5%, the same as last year.   Here is the Health Net proposal for 2018-2019:

 

HMO

$20 Office Visit

2017-2018 Rates

2018-2019 Rates

 

2018-2019

% Change

2018-2019

Annual Cost per Plan

Employee only

 

$643.64

$675.82

+5%

$8,109.84

Employee + Child(ren)

$1,126.34

$1,182.66

+5%

$14,191.92

Employee + Spouse

 

$1,544.71

$1,621.95

+5%

$19,463.40

Family

 

$1,963.07

$2,061.23

+5%

$24,734.76

 

We have not received rates for Delta Dental and VSP for the new school year, but it is anticipated that the increase will be minimal and affordable, and we will continue with both plans with the same coverage that has been in place since purchasing the plans through ASCIP. 

 

The open enrollment period for Fenton employees begins on June 1st and ends on June 15th.  Benefited employees may opt-out, opt-in or change plans within that window. 

 

Going forward, we will use a yearly projected increase of 10% for Kaiser and Health Net for our budget projections and determine the continued affordability of the plans as they are currently funded.

 

It is recommended that the Board establish an Ad Hoc Health Benefits Committee whose charge will be as follows:  1) to analyze how the current spending trend in health benefits will impact the organization, its operations, STRS and PERS obligations, and any future salary increases; and 2) to devise a plan for meeting the yearly projected increases in medical insurance premiums.  It is recommended that the Board determine the membership of this committee, which will begin meeting in August or September.  Progress will be shared at all regular board meetings, with a final recommendation brought to the full Board no latter than February 2019 for discussion, and possible implementation in July 2019.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the Kaiser and Health Net medical plans for the 2018-2019 school year and establish an Ad Hoc Health Benefits Committee, the membership of which is to be determined by the Board.

 

 

 

 

Item IV.E.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve policy to clarify the Health Benefits Opt-Out Agreement

 

BACKGROUND

 

When Fenton Avenue Charter School first gained full fiscal independence in January 1994, the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council researched every mechanism available to save funds in order to place much needed resources into the classrooms.  When the school assumed the administration of its own health benefits, the council researched how to reduce costs further and the concept of an “opt-out” of the health benefits package with a “cash in lieu” of stipend offered for those who meet the conditions of the opt-out (comparable coverage by another entity through a spouse) was enacted. 

 

ANALYSIS

 

While working with our Health Net and Kaiser representatives to negotiate rates for the new school year, the opt-out was mentioned, and the practice of allowing a full-time, benefited employee whose spouse is also a full-time benefited employee of Fenton to opt-out and receive the cash in lieu of stipend was shared.  The representatives, along with our brokers, shared that this is unheard of and not a practice that is followed by districts.  Typically, when a spouse of a current employee is hired, or if spouses are hired at the same time, one becomes the “member” and the other becomes the “dependent”.  If the employees receive “employee-only” coverage, each joins as a separate member.  There is no double coverage and no cash to opt-out.

 

Reviewing why the opt-out practice was put into practice so many years ago, it is evident that we have forgotten the reason for the practice:  to cut costs.  Allowing one Fenton-employed spouse to opt-out and receive a cash benefit while still receiving health benefits through Fenton was never the intent.  The organization is not cutting costs; it is increasing costs.

 

Reviewing the Opt-Out Agreement written by our attorney, Robert Levy, the first paragraph clearly states that “another entity” is providing the comparable coverage, which allows for the spouse to opt-out.  Mr. Levy was asked to write the agreement when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted to ensure that the agreement followed applicable laws.  Here is the first paragraph:

 

It is the intent of the Fenton Charter Public Schools to provide health insurance coverage for all its full-time employees.  Employees who have comparable insurance provided by another entity may make an annual election to opt-out of the health benefits package.  Proof of insurance coverage must be provided to the school prior to July 1, 2018.

 

The Opt-Out Agreement states that “another entity” is providing the insurance, which is not the case for  spouses who are both employed by Fenton and opt-out.  Therefore, and because the practice does not fulfill the original intent of the practice of cutting costs, it is recommended that the Board further clarity the intent of the Opt-Out Agreement through a formal policy (attached).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the policy regarding the opt-out of health benefits by full-time benefited employees, effective July 1, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.F.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve contract with NWEA™ for MAP® assessments for 2018-2019

 

BACKGROUND

 

Northwest Evaluation Association™ (NWEA™) is a global not-for-profit educational services organization known for their flagship interim assessment, Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®).  The tool measures academic growth and learning needs and is based on research that supports the validity of the assessment and data interpretation.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The Fenton schools are requesting the continued use of this online assessment tool to ensure the consistent administering of internal assessments across all Fenton schools and informative reporting to the Board. 

 

For the Fenton Primary Center, the MAP® assessments are especially critical due to the grade levels served by the school, none of which participate in the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP).  Using recognized internal assessments is a vital component in demonstrating progress based on a tool that is research-based and nationally normed for purposes of District oversight and renewal.

 

All five schools will administer the same assessments at each grade level, with consistent and regular sharing of results to ensure the Board is well-informed regarding student progress and areas in need of improvement, as well as comparisons to national norms.

 

The cost for the five schools is $38,412.50 for the 2018-2019 school year.  As a reference, the cost was $33,044.00 for 2017-2018 due to a lower enrollment overall.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the contract with NWEA™ MAP® for the 2018-2019 school year.

Item IV.G.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve agreement with Illuminate Education, Inc.

 

BACKGROUND

 

Illuminate Education, Inc. develops tools to collect, organize, and analyze student data.  Its products include Illuminate Student Information (ISI), a student information system that provides all school site staff with a single, web-based point of access to student information; Illuminate Data and Assessment Management System (DnA); and Illuminate Special Education, a web-based data management system that simplifies special education processes and regulations while ensuring speed and compliance.  The company was founded in 2009 and is based in Irvine, California.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools have contracted for the use of two of the three Illuminate software systems since 2012.  Only the Special Education software was not purchased due to the requirement that all LAUSD schools and District authorized charter schools utilize Welligent, the District’s Special Education software system.

 

The Illuminate tools have proven to be effective and efficient tools, especially as the organization has grown to five schools, and we are prepared to enter into a new three-year agreement.

 

The cost for the two Illuminate systems for the next three years, as per the new agreement, is as follows:

 

Illuminate Student Information (ISI)

 

Year

Product

Fee Structure

Estimate of Annual Fee

July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019

ISI System

$3.50 per student

(3,055 students)

$10,692.50

July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2020

ISI System

$4.00 per student

(3,055 students)

$12,220.00

July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

ISI System

$4.50 per student

(3,055 students)

$13,747.50

Illuminate Data and Assessment Management System (DnA)

 

Quantity

Product

Description

List

Total Price

July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

3,055

DnA Licenses

Per student licenses – Illuminate Data and Assessment

$3.50

$10,692.50

 

 

Assessment Scanning and Scoring

$1.00

$3,055.00

 

 

Access to Key Data Systems’ KDS Inspect Item Bank and Pre-built Assessments

$1.50

$4,582.50

 

TOTAL

$18,330.00

 

Yearly totals for two software systems under this three-year agreement:

 

July 1, 2018 - June 30, 2019: $29,022.50

 

July 1, 2019 - 2une 30, 2020: $30,550.00

 

July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021: $32,077.50

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the new software licenses and support agreement with Illuminate Education, Inc.

 

 

 

 

Item IV. H.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve revised schedule of technology and maintenance upgrades

 

BACKGROUND

 

Technology and maintenance upgrades which were planned for SMBCCS’ 2018-2019 budget are now requested to be purchased this school year due to the school’s projected ending balance for 2017-2018.

 

Additionally, maintenance projects for SMBCCS and technology upgrades for FACS, which will fall within the 2018-2019 budget, are being requested now in preparation for the new school year. 

 

All requested expenses have been placed in the 2017-2018 budget and 2018-2019 budgets, respectively, to ensure a positive and strong ending balance for each year and for each school.

 

ANALYSIS

 

A close review of the projected ending balances for the current school year and next school year (2018-2019) indicate that making the listed expenditures in the timeframe presented below would be in the best interests of both schools to make necessary purchases to meet State testing demands, upgrades for facilities, and necessary repairs.

 

The chart below displays purchases requested for this school year:

 

2017-2018  SMBCCS

 

Technology

Additional cameras

$20,000

Teacher laptop refresh

$109,096

Teacher iPad Plus iPad Cart (w/Apple Pencil)

$40,000

160 Macbook Air laptops (128GB) for SBAC testing and other assessments – grades 2-6

$160,000

Bretford Carts (6 carts)

$12,000

TOTAL

$341,096

Maintenance

New synthetic grass

$30,000

Remodel boys’ bathroom

$20,000

Kitchen work table

$7,100

Replace selected roofs

$25,000

TOTAL

$82,100

 

The chart below displays purchases requested for 2018-2019:

 

2018-2019  SMBCCS and FACS

 

SMBCCS - Maintenance

Marquee (updated estimate)

$140,000

Parking lot resurface

$75,000

Exterior lighting

$10,000

TOTAL

$225,000

FACS - Technology

120 Macbook Air laptops (128GB) for SBAC testing for graes 3-5)

$120,000

Bretford Carts (5 carts)

$10,000

TOTAL

$130,000

 

The 2018-2019 budgets will be presented for approval by the Board on June 21st, and the items for 2018-2019 will also be presented within that budget.  All items have been thoughtfully projected within the 2018-2019 budgets for SMBCCS and FACS. The items are presented here for approval to allow the Tech and Maintenance Teams enough lead time for implementation prior to the arrival of staff and students in August 2018.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the revised schedule of technology and maintenance upgrades and repairs for SMBCCS and FACS.

 

 

Item IV.I.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve new three-year Master Services Agreement with EdTec, Inc.

 

BACKGROUND

 

EdTec has provided back office services for the Fenton Charter Public Schools since 2015.  Kristin Dietz, Cindy Frantz, and Erik Okazaki are reliable, consistent, and available at all hours to answer questions and support the financial work of the Fenton Charter Public Schools.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The Board is reminded that the LAUSD Charter Schools Division’s recent review resulted in a top score of “4” for the area of Fiscal Management.  This score is a reflection of the work of EdTec and their support of the efforts of the FCPS office staff.

 

For the last three years, FCPS has been working on an initial contract for services from EdTec with an annual fee of $265,000.  This contract was extended yearly for the past three years.  In April, the Executive Director requested a new three-year contract that would coincide with her departure, and EdTec presented the attached contract.  The fee remains unchanged - $265,000 annually.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the new three-year contract with EdTec which begins on July 1, 2018 and ends on June 30, 2021.  This contract may be extended yearly with the approval of the Board.

 

 

 

 

Item IV.J.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve continued membership in the California Charter Schools Association

 

BACKGROUND

 

The California Charter Schools Association (CCSA) was established in 2003 as the membership and advocacy organization serving California charter schools.  With the Association at the helm, the California charter school movement has continued to grow and improve student achievement. In the 2016-17 school year, 1,254 public charter schools in California served nearly 603,000 students. CCSA’s mission is to see one million students attending charter public schools by 2022, with charter public schools outperforming non-charter public schools on every measure. CCSA has five major strategic priorities to advance charter schools: 1) Securing equal funding for charter school students, 2) Securing equal facilities for charter school students, 3) Making sure educators have the freedom they need to innovate and succeed with students, 4) Making sure successful educators have the supports they need to serve more students, and 5) Making sure that charter schools are held to ever-higher standards or lose their license to operate.

 

ANALYSIS

 

It would seem logical that as charter schools across the state continue to demonstrate success even twenty-five years after the passage of the original legislation, that acceptance of charter schools as partners in public education would be commonplace.  Unfortunately, due to a variety of factors, that is not the case, and CCSA’s advocacy efforts are needed more than ever.

 

After years of maintaining the membership dues at the same level ($5.00 per student), the Board od Directors of CCSA approved an increase to be phased in over two years:  in 2017-2018, membership dues were increased by $3.00 to $8.00 per student, and in January 2019, dues will increase an additional $2.00 per student to $10.  This increases Fenton’s cost to $32,000 and Board approval is required for this action.

 

The Board is reminded that new threats to the charter movement surface almost daily at every level, with the most significant and serious threats coming from potential State legislation.  Without the work of CCSA, Fenton, and all other California charter schools, would be facing negative media ads, harmful legislative actions, and a hostile environment overall without an avenue to truthfully inform the public about our work.  The Board is also reminded that the most serious action that is proposed yearly in the legislature is a moratorium on new charter schools and charter renewals, which would effectively shutter all charter schools in California.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve continued membership in the California Charter Schools Association at a cost of $10 per student.

 

 

Item IV.K.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve notice to authorizing district, LAUSD, to reserve the right of Fenton schools to leave LAUSD SELPA

 

BACKGROUND

 

In 2011, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) reorganized its Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) to provide charter schools with a continuum of options for serving students with disabilities.  The continuum spans from the least autonomous Option 1 to the most autonomous Charter Operated Program:  Option 3 (COP3).

 

Since the reorganization, nearly 200 independent charter schools have embraced autonomy and responsibility in special education through COP3.  This new autonomy has resulted in a steady increase in the percentage and range of students with disabilities enrolled in LAUSD charter schools.

 

ANALYSIS

 

Although the relationship with the District and the results achieved by the charter schools in COP3 have been positive, the COP3 members recognize that special education arrangements with the LAUSD SELPA are subject to change.  For this reason, charter schools must take steps necessary to preserve their autonomy and infrastructure by maintaining the ability to exit the SELPA should such action be in the best interest of the charter school and their students.

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools, along with the other COP3 member schools, will submit a letter as notification that all (or selected) schools in COP3 reserve the right to exit the LAUSD SELPA effective July 1, 2019.   

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the submission of the notice to the authorizing district, LAUSD, to reserve the right of Fenton schools to leave LAUSD SELPA.

 

 

 

Item IV.L.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve Ad Hoc Board Member Nominating Committee to review expiring board terms and recommend slate of directors for the 2018-2019 school year

 

BACKGROUND

 

Terms of office for the following board members will expire on June 30, 2018: 

 

Gary Borden

Daniel Laughlin

Gabriela Montoya

Walter Wallace

 

ANALYSIS

 

Each year, the Board has established an Ad Hoc Nominating Committee to identify prospective board members and establish a recommended slate of members for the new school year.  The board chair and vice chair are typically part of this committee, along with faculty and classified representatives.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors appoint Board Chair Joe Lucente and Vice Chair Yvette King-Berg as the chairs of the Ad Hoc Board Nominating Committee. Additionally, it is recommended the Board appoint Faculty Representatives Barbara Ausherman, Mercedes Meeks (FACS); Teresa Elvira, Walter Gomez, Robin Rodriguez and Megan Stevenson (SMBCCS); Meaghan Berry, Laura Holmes, and Coco Salazar (FPC), Angie Castellana Ferri (STEM), Cecilia Quijano (FCLA), and Classified Representatives Karla Contreras (FACS), Cedric Ramirez (FCLA/STEM), Erick Lazo (SMBCCS) and Laura Vasquez (FPC) to the Ad Hoc Committee.  It is further recommended that the Board request that the committee convene via conference call prior to June 21st to discuss recommendations to be presented to the Board on June 21, 2018 for formal approval.  Board officers for the new year will be elected at the first meeting of the 2018-2019 school year.

 

 

Item IV.M.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May 17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve evaluation documents and process for Chief Academic and Instructional Coaches

 

BACKGROUND

 

All Fenton employees are evaluated yearly utilizing specific approved protocols and processes.

 

ANALYSIS

 

This is the first year of the implementation of the new leadership model, and it’s critical that those leading this effort, and those leading the schools, develop a strong, trusting relationship.  We know the CAO and the Instructional Coaches have the experience, expertise, skills and knowledge to do the job as described on the Ad Hoc Planning and Implementation Committee-developed and board-approved job descriptions.  The Committee interviewed and recommended them, and the Board gave final approval.  The Committee also selected the new administrators with Board oversight, and the schools and Board have yearly affirmed the outstanding service of our continuing administrative team.   

 

It is hoped the evaluation process implemented as the leadership structure changes will promote supporting all Fenton staff to seek to continuously improve.  That said, the documents are intended to encourage open and ongoing conversations, and ultimately, the Board will be the final evaluators. 

 

The evaluation documents will be utilized by the Directors to review the work of the Chief Academic Officer and Instructional Coaches, and the same documents will be utilized as self-assessment tools.  Comparing the two may reveal misconceptions and misunderstandings that should be discussed and clarified to ensure positive organization-wide results.   

 

A more definitive document has been developed for the Board to evaluate the CAO, as similar to the Executive Director, the CAO serves at the will of the Board and may be released at any meeting.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the evaluation documents and evaluation process for the Chief Administrative Officer and Instructional Coaches.

 

 

 

 

V.  ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

Item V.A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

BACKGROUND

 

The FCPS OPEB Trust was formally established at the East West Bank and an investment portfolio created on March 28, 2016.  The portfolio was transferred to Cathay Wealth Management on October 30, 2017.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The President of the Trust, Walter Wallace, and Secretary of the Trust, Joe Lucente, will provide an update.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

This is an information item only and no action is required.

 

 

 

Item V.B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

May17, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: FCPS Core Values

 

BACKGROUND

 

Over the course of this school year, the Ad Hoc Planning and Implementation Committee consisting of Faculty and Classified Representatives, and administrators from all the Fenton schools, have met nearly once a month to discuss and finalize various topics.  One topic, which has been discussed and shared with all sites, is the FCPS Core Values.

 

ANALYSIS

 

We have developed one set, which is intended for staff to specifically define what we stand for and expect of ourselves.  The committee will continue to work on a second much shorter version for students.

 

The Board is asked to review both and provide input.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

This is an information item only and no action is required.

 

VI.  CLOSED SESSION

 

Chair Lucente announcement:

 

“The Board of Directors will now be moving into closed session to discuss matters described in Section VI.  Matters to be discussed are those permitted Government Code Section 54956.9 – Existing Litigation.”

 

 

 

VII.  RETURN TO OPEN SESSION

 

Chair Lucente will announce any action taken in Closed Session.

 

 

 

Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

Board Meeting Dates

2017-2018

 

All board meetings begin at 4:30 p.m.

 

Location

September 21, 2017

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

October 19, 2017

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

December 7, 2017

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90038

 

January 25, 2018

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

March 1, 2018

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

April 12, 2018

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

May 17, 2018

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90038

 

June 21, 2018

(Meeting will begin at 11:00 a.m.)

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352