Board Agenda

Fenton Charter Public Schools

Meeting of the Board of Directors 

AGENDA
FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes.

 

FCPS: 8928 B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 962-3630

FACS: 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342 • (818) 896-7482

SMBCCS: 1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038 • (323) 469-0971

FPC: 11351 DronfieldAvenue, Pacoima, CA 91331 • (818) 485-5900

STEM and FCLA: 8926 Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 • (818) 962-3636

 

REGULAR MEETING - BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 

December 6, 2018 – 4:30 P.M.

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA  90038

AGENDA

Instructions for Presentations to the Board by Parents and Citizens

The Fenton Charter Public Schools ("Charter Schools'") welcome your participation at the Charter Schools' Board meetings. The purpose of a public meeting of the Board of Directors ("Board") is to conduct the affairs of the Charter  Schools  in public. Your participation assures us of continuing community interest in our Charter Schools. To assist you in the case of speaking/ participating in our meetings, the following guide lines are provided:

 

  1. Agendas are available to all audience members at the door to the meeting. 
  1. '"Request to Speak" forms are available to all audience members who wish to speak on any agenda items or under the general category of " Presentations from the Public."" "Presentations from the Public" is set aside for members of the audience to raise issues that are not specifically on the However, due to public meeting laws, the Board can only list e n to your issue, not respond or take action. These presentations are limited to three (3) minutes and total time allotted to non-agenda items will not exceed fifteen (15) minutes. The Board may give direction to staff to respond to your concern or you may be offered the option of returning with a citizen-requested item.
  1. You may also complete a "Request to Speak'" form to address the Board on Agenda items. With regard to such agenda items, you may specify that agenda item on your "Request to Speak" form and you will be given an opportunity to speak for up to five (5) minutes when the Board discusses that item. The total time allocated to agenda items will not exceed thirty (30) minutes per item.
  1. When addressing the Board. speakers are requested to state their name and address from the podium and adhere to the time limits set forth. 
  1. Any public records relating to an agenda item for an open session of the Board which are distributed to all, or a majority of all, of the Board members shall be available for public inspection at 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, California.

 

I. PRELIMINARY

 

A. Call to Order – Chairperson of the Board – Joe Lucente

 

B. Roll Call – Secretary of the Board – Toni Frear, Marie Kirakossian and Megan Stevenson

 

C. Flag Salute – Chair Lucente

 

D. Approval of the Agenda – Chair Lucente

 

The Chair will request any amendments to the agenda, and then approval.

 

E. Minutes of Previous Regular Meeting - Chair Lucente

 

Minutes of the October 25, 2018 Regular Meeting of the Board of Directors will be presented for approval. 

 

II. COMMUNICATIONS

 

A. Presentations from the Public – Chair Lucente

 

Any persons present desiring to address the Board of Directors on any proper matter.

 

Agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than five (5) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed thirty (30) minutes per agenda item.  

 

Non-agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than three (3) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed fifteen (15) minutes.  

 

Ordinarily, Board members will not respond to presentations and no action can be taken.  However, the Board may give direction to staff following a presentation.

 

B. Committee/Council Reports

 

1. Finance Committee:  Sarah Ananta, Maria Patrón (FPC); Holly Putnam, AJ Smith (SMBCCS); Romelia Lagunas (FCLA); Dominica Yasuda (STEM)

Budget, Facilities and Safety Council:  Vanessa Ettleman, Tony Peña (FACS)

 

2. Instruction Committee:  Nitima Angus, Mara Shinn Smith (FPC); Gaby Arroyo, Jennifer Nishimoto (SMBCCS); Maria Cordero (FCLA); Melissa Sopitkuankan (STEM)

Curriculum and Assessment Council:  Lee Melo, Christopher Torres (FACS)

 

3. Personnel Committee:  Nina Ferman, Coco Salazar (FPC); Megan Stevenson, Tiene Hauck (SMBCCS); Kate Hetu (FCLA); Elisa Vallejo (STEM)

Human Resource and Personnel Council:  Leanna Hendrix, Mercedes Meeks (FACS)

 

4. Parent/Community Advocacy Committee:  Robyn Gallo, Bridget Ruiz (FPC); Ariana Gomez, Bunny Wolfer (SMBCCS); Krista Casanova (FCLA); Raquel Contreras (STEM)

School-Community Relations Council:  Elizabeth Jimenez, Yadira Mendoza (FACS)

 

a. School Site Council 

b. English Learner Advisory Committee

 

C. Treasurer/CFO’s Report:  Kristin Dietz, FCPS Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer will present the October financial statements, cash flow position, any variations in revenues and expenditures from the approved 2018-2019 budgets for all sites, and present the First Interim Reports.

 

D. Directors’ Reports 

 

1. Fenton Avenue Charter School (FACS) – Mrs. Leticia Padilla Parra

 

2. Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School (SMBCCS) – Mr. Cary Rabinowitz

 

3. Fenton Primary Center (FPC) – Mr. Richard Parra

 

4. Fenton STEM Academy (STEM) – Mrs. Jennifer Miller

 

5. Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (FCLA) – Mrs. Jennifer Miller

 

E. Chief Academic Officer’s Report – Dr. David Riddick

 

F. Executive Director’s Report:  Irene Sumida

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items. 

 

  1. A.Recommendation to approve Memorandum of Understanding with “The World is Just a Book Away” (“WIJABA”) and Fenton Avenue Charter School

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

A. Recommendation to receive and file the June 30, 2018 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

B. Recommendation to approve LAUSD Certification of Board Compliance Review

 

C. Recommendation to approve updated FCPS Boundaries Policy

D. Recommendation to approve revised Procurement and Purchasing Procedures 

 

V. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION 

 

  1. A.Update on revisions to Employee Handbook

 

  1. A.Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

  1. A.Update from Ad Hoc Health Benefits Committee

 

  1. A.Update from Ad Hoc Instructional Focus Committee

VI. CLOSED SESSION

 

Chair Lucente will make the following announcement:

 

“The Board of Directors will now be moving into closed session to discuss matters described in Section VI.  Matters to be discussed are those permitted by Government Code Section 54957 (personnel).”

 

Convene to closed session

 

  1. A.Government Code 54956.8

CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS

PROPERTY:  8928A Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352

 

  1. A.Government Code 54957

PUBLIC EMPLOYEE DISCIPLINE/DISMISSAL/RELEASE

VII. RETURN TO OPEN SESSION - ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

Reconvene to open session

 

Chair Lucente will announce any action taken in Closed Session.

 

VIII. ANNOUNCEMENTS

IX. ADJOURNMENT 

 

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools will be held on Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools, 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

 

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance, disability-related modifications or accommodations, including auxiliary aids or services, in order to participate in the public meeting of the FCPS Board of Directors, please contact the main office of either Fenton Avenue Charter School or the Fenton Primary Center at (818) 896-7482.  Notification of 72 hours prior to the meeting will enable FCPS to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accommodations and accessibility to this meeting.  Upon request, FCPS shall also make available this agenda and all other public records associated with this meeting in appropriate alternative formats for persons with disabilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item I.E.

UNAPPROVED MINUTES

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

 

October 25, 2018

 

A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools was held on Thursday, October 25, 2018, at 4:30 p.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools, 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352.

 

I. PRELIMINARY

 

A. Call to Order – Chairperson of the Board – Joe Lucente

 

The Board of Directors meeting was called to order at 4:37 p.m. by Chair Lucente.

 

B. Roll Call – Secretaries of the Board – Laura Holmes, Krystal Rodriguez and Coco Salazar

 

Board Members Present

Diane Abeyta, Parent Representative

Yvette King-Berg, Community Representative

Joe Lucente, Community Representative

Walter Wallace, Community Representative 

 

Board Members Not Present

Gary Borden, Community Representative

Daniel Laughlin, Parent Representative

Gabriela Montoya, Parent Representative

 

C. Flag Salute – Chair Lucente

 

Chair Lucente led the Board and the public in the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

D. Approval of the Agenda – Chair Lucente

 

On MOTION of Yvette King Berg, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the Agenda (Item I.D.) was approved as presented.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

E. Approval of Minutes

 

Minutes of Previous Regular Meeting – Chair Lucente

 

On MOTION of Diane Abeyta, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the minutes of the September 20, 2018 Regular Meeting (Item I.E.) were approved as presented. 

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

II. COMMUNICATIONS

 

A. Presentations from the Public – Chair Lucente

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

B. Committee/Council Reports 

 

Minutes of all meetings held by any committee and/or council were sent to the Board Members prior to this meeting.  

 

There were no further reports by committees/councils.  

 

C. Treasurer/CFO’s Report 

 

Kristin Dietz, Vice President of EdTec, and Treasurer and CFO of the FCPS, presented the following update:

  • ïConsolidated annual net income is now forecasted at -$86,829
    • oThis is a net decrease of -$478,000 from the previous forecast.  Main drivers of this change are:
        • ïELA program purchase at FPC not previously budgeted 

(-$223,840)

        • Reduced enrollment at FPC from 720 to 710 (-$114,000 in associated revenue/expenses)
        • Increase in capitalized expenditures due to timing of projects (-$30,000 consolidated)
    • oFACS and SMBCCS are forecasting negative operating income and therefore expected to tap into reserves this year; both have significant reserves
    • oForecasted ending fund balances remain strong across all sites
    • oConsolidated ending fund balance forecast of $26,000,000 at year end
    • oCash flows remaining consistent and very strong
    • oConsolidated cash balance is $13,000,000 as of 8/31/18

 

D. Directors’ Reports 

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School (FACS) – Leticia Padilla Parra, Director, reported.

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School (SMBCCS) – Cary Rabinowitz, Director, reported.

 

Fenton Primary Center (FPC) – Richard Parra, Director, reported.

 

Fenton STEM Academy (STEM) – Jennifer Miller, Director, reported.

 

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (FCLA) – Jennifer Miller, Director, reported.

 

E. Chief Academic Officer’s Report 

 

Fenton Charter Pubic Schools (FCPS) – Dr. David Riddick, Chief Academic Officer, reported.

 

F. Executive Director’s Report 

 

Fenton Charter Public Schools (FCPS) – Dr. David Riddick, Chief Academic Officer, reported for Mrs. Sumida.

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

    1. a.Recommendation to approve the Fenton Charter Public Schools Master Plan for English Learners

On MOTION of Yvette King-Berg, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the Consent Agenda (Item III.A.) was approved as presented.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

A. Recommendation to receive FASB ASC 715 OPEB report for June 30, 2018

 

On MOTION of Diane Abeyta, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to receive the FASB ASC 715 OPEB report for June 30, 2018 (Item IV.A.) was approved as presented.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

B. Recommendation to approve Local Indicators for the California School Dashboard for FACS, SMBCCS, FPC, STEM and FCLA

On MOTION of Diane Abeyta, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the Local Indicators for the California School Dashboard for FACS, SMBCCS, FPC, STEM and FCLA (Item IV.B.) was approved.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

C. Recommendation to approve FCPS Youth Suicide Prevention Policy

 

On MOTION of Yvette King-Berg, SECONDED by Diane Abeyta and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the FCPS Youth Suicide Prevention Policy (Item IV.C.) was approved.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

D. Recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director

 

On MOTION of Walter Wallace, SECONDED by Yvette King-Berg and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director (Item IV.D.) was approved.

 

Aye: (4) Abeyta, King-Berg, Lucente, Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

V. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION

 

A. LAUSD Charter Schools Division Oversight Process

 

B. Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

C. Update from Ad Hoc Health Benefits Committee

 

D. Update from Ad Hoc Instructional Focus Committee

 

E. E-Rate Executive Summary

These were information items only and no action was taken.

 

VI. ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

VII. ADJOURNMENT 

 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:10 p.m.

 

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools will be held on Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium of Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School, 1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA  90038.

 

Respectfully submitted:

 

______________________________ ___________________________

Laura Holmes Krystal Rodriguez

Secretary of the Board Secretary of the Board

 

______________________________

Coco Salazar

Secretary of the Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. B. 

 

Committee and Council Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.1.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Avenue Charter School

 

Unapproved Minutes of the

Budget, Facilities and Safety Council

 

October 22, 2018

 

A meeting of the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council was held on Monday, October 22, 2018, at 7:15 a.m. in the conference room of Fenton Avenue Charter School at 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342.

 

Call to Order: Vanessa Ettleman, Co-Chair

 

The Budget, Facilities and Safety Council Meeting was called to order at 7:15 a.m. by Co-Chair Vanessa Ettleman.

 

Roll Call: Fanny Adnitt, Secretary

 

Members Present Members Absent Others Present

 

See attached sign-in sheet for members present, members absent, members excused and others present.

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Vanessa Ettleman, Co-Chair

There were no additions/corrections to the agenda.

 

Item #1

Approval of Minutes from the August 31, 2018 meeting of the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council

(Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Christie Collins, SECONDED by Fong Chau, and CARRIED, the Minutes of the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council Meeting of August 31, 2018 were approved as presented.

 

Item #2 

Presentations from the Public: Vanessa Ettleman, Co-Chair

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: 

 

Item #3 

California Shake Out, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

Director Lety Padilla Parra informed the council that the Great California Shakeout drill that took place at FACS last Friday, October 19th, 2018 was seamlessly completed in record time. An email was sent out, inviting the staff to reply with any concerns or suggestions. There were a few concerns about uncooperative door locks, top heavy desks due to computers, batteries needing replacement, and need of review for procedure notifying parents of students’ whereabouts.

 

Item #4

Budget Update, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

Director Lety Padilla Parra shared with the council that the school continues to be in the negative due to low enrollment. The favorable ADA of 98.1% is helping the school, but further discussion will be needed regarding next year’s budget to avoid continual dipping into reserves.

 

Item #5

Facilities Update, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

Director Lety Padilla Parra informed the council that no purchases will be made due to the low budget, but a few priority safety issues will be addressed: the cracks on the playground asphalt, the asphalt around the 4th grade area, and the cracks on the asphalt between the 3rd grade and the cafeteria area. These renovations are to be approved by the board this month and will happen during the winter or summer break. There are also pressing plumbing issues and money has been set aside yearly, so they can be addressed one building at a time during breaks.

 

New Business: 

 

Item #6

Fundraiser Update, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

Director Lety Padilla Parra briefed the council about the conclusion of the World’s Finest Chocolate Sale and the current Halloween Baskets Raffle Ticket Sales. Tony Pena, who is in charge of the fundraisers, will give a more thorough report during the next meeting.

 

Announcements

 

Director Lety Padilla Parra announced that “The World is Just a Book Away” foundation reached out to FACS, expressing the desire to donate books and/or a complete library. The foundation will continue the dialogue with FACS to best serve the school.

 

Next Regular Meeting: To be determined 

 

Adjournment

 

By order of GENERAL CONSENSUS, the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council adjourned at 7:45 a.m. The next regular meeting of the council is to be determined.

Minutes respectfully submitted by Fanny Adnitt. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.2.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Curriculum and Assessment Council

October 24, 2018

7:10 a.m. – Conference Room

 

AGENDA

 

Call to Order: Lee Melo and Christopher Torres – Co-Chairs

 

Roll Call: Cynthia Eschenfelder and Juan Gomez – Secretaries

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Lee Melo, and Christopher Torres – Co Chairs

 

 

Item #1 Minutes from the September 12, 2018 meeting of the Curriculum and Assessment Council (Motion to Approve)

 

On the MOTION of Otilia Lopez, SECONDED by Rebecca Williamson, and CARRIED, the minutes of the Curriculum and Assessment Council from September 12 , 2018 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public:  Lee Melo, and Christopher Torres – Co-Chairs

 

Item #2                       Any persons desiring to address the Curriculum and Assessment Council on any proper matter.

 

 

Old Business:

 

Item #3 No Old Business

 

New Business:

 

Item #4 Official Release of Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment Results, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra shared the official SBAC results for the 2017-2018 school year. She shared that though the FACS scores are not equal to or greater than those of LAUSD, the 4-point growth for FACS in ELA and Math is greater than the growth made by LAUSD. In addition, she also shared the growth in SBAC scores for particular subgroups at the school. On the other hand, she also shared that as a school we still are not where we need to be in regards to our SBAC scores and we will continue to show growth as we move forward. She shared that the changes we are making in the classroom as an organization, will help continue with this growth as a school. 

 

Item #5 Fall 2018-2019 NWEA MAP Baseline Results, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

Mrs. Padilla Parra shared that we are administering the NWEA MAP assessments three times a year in comparison to two times a year as we have in the past. She also shared that mid-year goal setting meetings with teachers will take place after the second administration of NWEA scores are finalized in order to use the data for any necessary changes to instruction. She also shared that the first administration of the NWEA MAP scores showed strong results.

 

Item #6 Professional Development Update, Lety Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra shared that this Friday October 26, 2018 instructional coach, Angie Ferri, along with other FCPS ELD expert teachers, will present an ELD training for Math instruction that can benefit all students. Also, Mrs. Padilla Parra aasked the council to discuss the idea of bringing back Benchmark training during professional development. The council discussed that the instructional coaches are already meeting with grade levels in order to help plan for Benchmark instruction, therefore we can possibly hold off on bringing the trainer back this year. In addition, Mrs. Padilla Parra also shared that we will participate in an MTSS training presented by LACOE on Monday January 7, 2019. Both the FPC and FACS organization will participate in the training hosted at FACS.

 

Announcements: Due to lack of CAST resources available to prepare 5th graders for the new state science assessment, the use of practice tests and materials  available online is recommended.

 

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBA

 

 

Adjournment: On the MOTION of Marya Asadurian, SECONDED by Jacquelin Claudio , and CARRIED, the Curriculum Assessment Council adjourned at 7:50 a.m.

 

 

 

Minutes submitted respectfully by Juan Gomez and Cynthia Eschenfelder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.3.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Human Resource and Personnel Council

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Human Resource and Personnel Council

October 23, 2018

 

A meeting of the Human Resource and Personnel Council was held on Tuesday, October 23, 2018, at 7:15 a.m. in the conference room at Fenton Avenue Charter School at 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, California 91342. 

 

Call to Order: Leanna Hendrix, Council Co-Chair

 

The Human Resource and Personnel Council meeting was called to order at 7:20 a.m. by Council Co-Chair, Leanna Hendrix.

 

Roll Call: Leanna Hendrix, Council Co-Chair

 

Members Present: Lizette Adkisson, Barbara Ausherman, Louis Chernovsky, Leanna Hendrix, Martha May, Mercedes Meeks, DeAnn Michiels, Jaime Osornia, Karen Scharf, Leticia Padilla Parra, Barbara Aragón, Jessi Tello 

 

Non-council Members Present: Veronica Ramos

 

Members Excused: Karla Contreras, Lillian De La Torre, Mimi Whang 

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Mercedes Meeks, Council Co-Chair 

 

Item #1               Minutes from the August 28, 2018 meeting of the Human Resource and Personnel Council (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of DeAnn Michiels, SECONDED by Jaime Osornia, and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public:  Leanna Hendrix, Council Co-Chair

 

Item #2 Any person(s) desiring to address the Human Resource and Personnel Council on any proper matter. 

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business:  

 

Item #3 Selection of Human Resource and Personnel Council Secretary, Mercedes Meeks and Leanna Hendrix, Council Co-Chairs 

 

Mrs. Hendrix asked the council for volunteers to serve as secretary for the council.  DeAnn Michiels and Mary Gunckel graciously agreed to share the position.

New Business:

 

Item #4 Request for Maternity Leave, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra shared Geina Addison’s letter to request maternity leave.  Mrs. Addison’s leave began on October 19, 2018.  She is planning to return to work on January 14, 2019.

 

Item #5 Probationary Status Teacher Observations, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director 

(Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra informed the council that five probationary teachers will be observed over the next two weeks.  The process includes both a pre-observation and a post-observation meeting to discuss lesson plans and then reflect upon the lesson afterwards.  

 

Item #6 Earned Increase Walkthroughs, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director 

(Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra reviewed the process for Earned Increase Walkthroughs.  The team consists of lead teachers, faculty representatives, and administration who will walk through classrooms to observe the room environment, organization, teacher interaction with students, classroom management, and lesson plans.  They will be in each classroom for no more than five minutes.   Earned Increase Walkthroughs will take place November 5 – 8, 2018.   

 

Item #7 FCPS Boundaries Policy, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director 

(Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra reiterated the importance of the FCPS Boundaries Policy that was recently sent out to staff via e-mail by Mrs. Sumida.  She emphasized key points of the policy including appropriate and inappropriate behavior for the staff in regards to their interactions with students.  Consequences for the staff may involve disciplinary action up to termination.  A discussion ensued regarding appropriate ways to interact with a student when he/she is displaying unsafe or dangerous behavior.    

 

Announcements: none

 

Next Regular Meeting:  TBA

 

Adjournment: On MOTION of Mercedes Meeks, SECONDED by Mary Gunckel, and CARRIED, the Human Resource and Personnel Council meeting adjourned at 7:41 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Leanna Hendrix and DeAnn Michiels

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Personnel Committee

 

October 23, 2018

 

A meeting of the Personnel Committee was held on Monday, October 23, 2018 at 7:20 a.m. in the Conference room at Fenton Charter Leadership Academy at 8926 Sunland Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352.

 

Call to Order: Kate Hetu, Chair

 

The Personnel Committee meeting was called to order at 7:20 a.m. by Chair, Kate Hetu.

 

Roll Call: Stephanie Ellerbe, Secretary

 

Personnel Committee Members Present: Kate Hetu, Veronica Palazzola, Stephanie Ellerbe, Abigail Gillmore, Brooke Schiffman, Jennifer Miller, Jennifer Pimentel 

 

Excused Members: Cedric Ramirez and Fernando Gomez 

 

Non-Committee Members: Cecilia Quijano, Elisa Vallejo, Priscilla Gentry, Kelley Christenson

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Kate Hetu, Chair

 

There were no additions/corrections to the agenda. 

 

Approval of Minutes from August 28, 2018:  Kate Hetu, Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the August 28, 2018 meeting of the Personnel Committee (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION  of Veronica Palazzola, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted. 

 

Presentations from the Public:  Kate Hetu, Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Personnel Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: None

 

New Business: 

 

Item #3 First Semester Formal Observation Lessons, Jennifer Miller, FCLA Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Miller presented on first semester formal observations, which started in October and will be ending December 2, 2018. All teachers have signed up for their formal observations and the pre-observation and post-observation meetings have also been scheduled. A combined total of 14 teachers will be observed during the 2018-2019 school year, roughly 45% of the certificated staff. The formal observation cycle consists of a pre-observation lesson meeting, lesson observation, and post-observation meeting.  A total of four cycles occur during the probationary period. Teachers currently participating in the observation cycle will complete an ELA lesson in the fall and a math lesson in the spring. The opportunity to be in the classroom to see a full lesson cycle is very validating for all involved. This year the Administrative Coordinators will be splitting their time to observe teachers during formal observations as well. 

 

Item #4 Earned Increase Walkthrough Week, Jennifer Miller, FCLA Director (Informational Item)

 

The Earned Increase Walkthroughs will occur November 5th through November 9th, 2018. A team of four members consisting of administration, a faculty representative and lead teachers. The team will observe classrooms for criteria based off of Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Effective Teaching.  Earned increase walkthroughs provide a collective view of strengths through peer observation. All teachers participate in the Earned Increase Walkthroughs. Lead teachers will be taking a half-day to complete walkthroughs. Thank you to the lead teachers and faculty representatives for their assistance in observing classrooms.  

 

Announcements: 

 

There were no announcements.

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment:

 

On MOTION of Veronica Palazzola, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the Personnel Committee adjourned at 7:39 a.m.  

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Stephanie Ellerbe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton STEM Academy

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Personnel Committee

 

October 23, 2018

 

A meeting of the Personnel Committee was held on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 at 7:22 a.m. in the Conference Room at Fenton STEM Academy at 8926 Sunland Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352.

 

Call to Order: Elisa Vallejo, Chair

 

The Personnel Committee meeting was called to order at 7:19 a.m. by Chair, Elisa Vallejo

 

Roll Call: Priscilla Gentry, Secretary

 

Personnel Committee Members Present: Elisa Vallejo, Priscilla Gentry, Kelley Christenson, Jennifer Miller, Jennifer Pimentel

 

Excused Members: Cedric Ramirez, Bianca Bell-Reed

 

Non-Committee Members: Kate Hetu, Stephanie Ellerbe, Abigail Gillmore, Veronica Palazzola, Brooke Schiffman, Cecilia Quijano, Kelley Christenson, Elisa Vallejo 

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Elisa Vallejo, Chair

 

There were no additions/corrections to the agenda. 

 

Approval of Minutes from August 28, 2018:  Elisa Vallejo, Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the August 28, 2018 meeting of the Personnel Committee (Motion to Approve) 

 

On MOTION of Kelley Christenson, SECONDED by Jennifer Pimentel, and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted. 

 

Presentations from the Public:  Elisa Vallejo, Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Personnel Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: None

 

New Business: 

 

Item #3 First Semester Formal Observation Lessons, Jennifer Miller, FCLA/STEM Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Miller presented on first semester formal observations, which started in October and will be ending in early December. All teachers have signed up for their formal observations and the pre-observation and post-observation meetings have also been scheduled. A combined total of 14 teachers will be observed during the 2018-2019 school year, roughly 45% of the certificated staff. The formal observation cycle consists of a Pre-observation lesson meeting, Lesson observation, and post-observation meeting.  A total of four cycles occur during the probationary period. Teachers currently participating in the observation cycle will complete an ELA lesson in the fall and a math lesson in the spring. The opportunity to be in the classroom to see a full lesson cycle is very validating for all involved. This year the Administrative Coordinators will be splitting their time to observe teachers during formal observations, as well. 

 

Item #4 Earned Increase Walkthrough Week, Jennifer Miller, STEM Director (Informational Item)

 

The Earned Increase Walkthroughs will occur November 5th through November 9th, 2018. A team of four members consisting of two administrators, a faculty representative and a lead teacher will participate. The team will observe classrooms for criteria based off of Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Effective Teaching.  Earned increase walkthroughs provide a collective view of strengths and weakness through peer observations. All teachers participate in the Earned Increase Walkthroughs. Lead teachers will be taking a half-day to complete the walkthroughs. Thank you to the lead teachers and faculty representatives for their assistance in observing classrooms.  

 

Announcements: 

 

There were no announcements.

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment:

 

On MOTION of Kelley Christenson, SECONDED by Priscilla Gentry, and CARRIED, the Personnel Committee adjourned at 7:39 a.m.  

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Priscilla Gentry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Primary Center

                                                        

Unapproved Minutes

Personnel Committee

                                                        

October 25, 2018

 

A meeting of the Personnel Committee was held on Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 7:15 a.m. in the library of the Fenton Primary Center at 11351 Dronfield Avenue, Pacoima, CA, 91331.

Call to Order:        Nina Ferman, Co-Chair 

 

The Personnel Committee Meeting was called to order at 7:17 a.m. by Co-Chair, Nina Ferman.

         

Roll Call:               Karen Knapp, Secretary

 

Members Present: Coco Salazar, Nina Ferman, Karen Knapp, Jeanette Hernandez, Laura Holmes, Wendy Kaufman, Judy Lee, Cristina Moran, Richard Parra, Krystal Rodriguez, Shirley Saetang, Angelica Salceda, Sandra Valle, Laura Vasquez

 

Members Excused: Lorena Sanchez, Monica Castañeda, Daniela Quila, Cedric Ramirez, Celina Calvillo

 

Members Absent: None

         

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda:  Coco Salazar, Co-Chair 

 

The following item was added to the agenda.

 

Item #6 Boundaries Policy, Richard Parra, FPC Director (Informational Item)

         

Approval of Minutes from September 7, 2018: Nina Ferman, Co-Chair

         

Item #1                   Minutes from the September 7, 2018 meeting of the Personnel Committee  

                                (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Sandra Valle, SECONDED by Laura Holmes, and CARRIED, the Minutes of the Personnel Committee Meeting of September 7, 2018 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Coco Salazar, Co-Chair

 

Item #2                   Any persons desiring to address the Personnel Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business:

 

None        

New Business:

Item #3 Earned Increase Walkthroughs, Richard Parra, FPC Director

                         (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Parra shared a checklist for Earned Increase Walkthroughs, which included the criteria the observation team will be looking for. The criteria is based on Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Effective Teaching. The observation team is comprised of administration, lead teachers, and faculty reps. Five people from the team will come to observe each teacher. They will also observe bulletin boards, weekly and daily objectives, daily schedules, lesson plans, and the teacher’s use of think-pair-share and other EDI strategies while teaching. The Earned Increase Walkthroughs will take place November 5-8.

               

Item #4 First Semester Evaluations, Richard Parra, FPC Director

(Informational Item)

 

Mr. Parra informed the committee that we have three probationary teachers: Claire Nichols, Erika Quiñonez, and Sarah Lin. The evaluation process includes a pre-observation meeting, the lesson observation, and a post-observation meeting to reflect upon the lesson afterwards. Each observation has been scheduled and will take place over the next few weeks.

 

Item #5 Instruction and Employee Health Benefits Ad Hoc Committees, Richard   

                        Parra, FPC Director (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Parra shared that FCPS is forming Instruction and Employee Health Benefits Ad Hoc Committees. He reiterated that during the last Saturday Leadership Team meeting, each school was asked to select someone to be on each of these Ad Hoc committees. The Personnel Committee would like to invite Irene Sumida to present to our staff regarding Employee Health Benefits.

 

Item #6           Boundaries Policy, Richard Parra, FPC Director 

(Informational Item)

 

Mr. Parra explained the importance of the FCPS Boundaries Policy, which was recently sent out to all staff through email by Mrs. Sumida. The policy outlines appropriate and inappropriate behavior for staff in regards to their interactions with students. The policy also states the consequences for staff members, which could involve disciplinary actions up to termination. With the growing amount of litigation in California regarding inappropriate interactions, all staff are encouraged to review the Boundaries Policy.

 

Announcements: There were no announcements.

         

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment:

 

On MOTION of Wendy Kaufman, SECONDED by Krystal Rodriguez, and CARRIED, the Personnel Committee meeting adjourned at 7:40 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Karen Knapp

 

Item II.B.4.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Primary Center

Unapproved Minutes of the Parent Advocacy Committee

 

October 26, 2018

 

A meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee was held on Friday, October 26, 2018 at 7:15 a.m. in the library of Fenton Primary Center at 11351 Dronfield Avenue, Pacoima, CA, 91331.

 

Call to Order: Robyn Gallo, Co-Chair

 

The Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting was called to order at 7:17 a.m. by Co-Chair Robyn Gallo. 

 

Roll Call: Claire Nichols, Secretary

 

Members Present: Robyn Gallo, Bridget Ruiz, Claire Nichols, Diana Lucas, Karen Knapp, Tony Peña, Sarah Lin, Katherine Sheppard, Caitlin McMabell, Gurpreet Gill, Krystal Rodriguez, Coco Salazar, Richard Parra

 

Members Absent: None.

 

Members Excused: Lorena Sanchez, Sandra Lee, Paola Ramirez, Wendy Kaufman, Abigail Lopez-Dee, Monica Castañeda, America Funes, Felix Carillo, Christina Peña

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Bridget Ruiz, Co-Chair

 

There were no additions or correction to the Agenda. 

 

Approval of Minutes from October 4, 2018: Robyn Gallo, Co-Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the October 4, 2018 meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee 

(Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Krystal Rodriguez, SECONDED by Claire Nichols, and CARRIED, the Minutes of the

Parent Advocacy Committee of October 4, 2018, were approved as submitted. 

 

Presentations from the Public: Bridget Ruiz, Co-Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Parent Advocacy Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: 

 

There was no old business. 

 

New Business:

 

Item #3 Fall World’s Finest Chocolate Sale Update Tony Peña, Family Center Director (Informational)

 

As of the morning of October 26, 2018, Mr. Peña was still waiting for the last of the chocolate shipments. The final totals are yet to be tallied, but the estimate is $12,000. Exact figures are to come. The top-selling class was Mrs. Ferman’s class.  

 

Item #4 American Cancer Society Fundraiser Update– Robyn Gallo, Co-Chair (Informational)

 

The fundraiser for the American Cancer Society raised $1,720. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society. 

 

Item #5 Mutt-i-grees Food and Blanket Drive- Katherine Sheppard, Mutt-i-grees Lead (Informational)

 

The Mutt-i-grees Food and Blanket Drive will be held from December 3, 2018 to December 14, 2018. Students will be asked to donate items such as blankets, towels, and canned pumpkin. Miss Sheppard will create a flyer to go home on November 26, 2018. The items collected will be donated to a local animal shelter. 

 

Item #6 Schoolwide Winter Theme EventsBridget Ruiz, Co-Chair (Motion to Approve)

 

Holiday Spirit Week will be held from December 10, 2018 to December 14, 2018. 

 

Monday: Wear red or green.

Tuesday: Wear a holiday or winter headband.

Wednesday: Wear holiday or winter accessories.

Thursday: Wear holiday or winter pajamas. 

Friday: Wear holiday or winter clothing.

 

On MOTION of Diana Lucas, SECONDED by Gurpreet Gill, and CARRIED, the Holiday Spirit Week activities were approved. 

 

Announcements: 

 

Mr. Parra announced that the Winter Staff Appreciation Breakfast will be held on December 14, 2018.

 

Mr. Parra announced that CCSA would like to offer a class for parents  about charter schools at 

Fenton Primary Center.

 

Ms. Salazar requested that any teachers who receive an email from a soldier to tell Mr. Parra so he can share it. 

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment:

 

On MOTION of Karen Knapp, SECONDED by Krystal Rodriguez, and CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee meeting was adjourned at 7:32 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Claire Nichols, Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Unapproved Minutes of the School Community Relations Council

November 2, 2018

 

A meeting of the School Community Relations Council was held on Friday, November 2, 2018, at 7:15 a.m. in the conference room of Fenton Avenue Charter School at 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342.

 

Call to Order:  Yadira Mendoza, Co-Chair

 

The meeting of the School Community Relations Council was called to order at 7:20 a.m. by Yadira Mendoza, Co-Chair.

 

Members Present: Barbara Aragón, Robin Brenneisen, Breanne Francois, Yadira Mendoza, Tiffany Walker, Leticia Padilla Parra, and Cheryl Perkins

 

Members Absent:  

 

Members Excused:   Alin Kazarian, Jessi Tello, Elizabeth Jimenez, Lara Hovaguimian, 

and Angel Garcia

 

Item #1: Minutes from the October 11, 2018 meeting of the School Community Relations Council (Motion to Approve) 

 

On MOTION of Robin Brenneisen, SECONDED by Cheryl Perkins, and CARRIED, 

the minutes were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Yadira Mendoza, Co-Chair

 

Item #2 Any person(s) desiring to address the Human Resource and Personnel Council on any proper matter. 

 

There were no presentations from the public.

            

New Business:

 

Item #3 Mutt-i-gree Awards, Barbara Aragón, FACS Assistant Director

(Informational Item

 

Ms. Aragón shared that there was previously a monthly character award titled “The Jeter Award” initiated in 2011. Both DeAnn Michiels and Mary Gunckel suggested that students be recognized for their positive character traits with a similar award entitled, “The Mutt-i-gree Character Award.”  Two awards will be presented twice yearly for those students displaying “Giving” and “Pack Leader” attributes.  This award would be in lieu of one of the character trait awards presently given.  The new design of the award will include a dog wearing a collar encouraging all to be a “LIGHT” in line with our firefly theme.

 

Item #4 Scholastic Book Fair, Cheryl Perkins, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item

 

Mrs. Perkins shared that the annual book fair was tentatively scheduled for December. She recommended that the date be changed to allow time for securing volunteers, for advertising, and for scheduling the walk through. Council members considered school weeks that would be the least impactful to staff.  A book fair date of March 5-7 was tentatively scheduled. Staff will prepare the library February 27th and students will preview the fair February 28th through March 4th.  Mrs. Perkins stated that Mrs. Meeks will continue to assist in book fair preparations and requested that others partner with her.  After some discussion, it was agreed that the duties will be delegated to council members.  Ms. Aragón expressed that this school-wide event benefits all students. She will inform staff members that interested parties outside of this council, are encouraged to assist. Mrs. Brenneisen recommended the Scholastic magazine, Storyworks, as a possible alternative to Scholastic News. She will present it at the next meeting. 

 

Item #5 Library Donation from The World is Just a Book Away Foundation Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra explained that the plans for receiving the donation from The World is Just a Book Away is in progress.  She shared that this foundation’s idea of having donors establish libraries, came from a book about how reading had changed the lives of the subjects.  She related some of the criteria for obtaining a modernized library.  This includes using the foundation’s colors (yellow, blue, and green), contributing 10% which may be in the form of labor such as applying barcodes, having the library bear the foundation’s name, and displaying the donor’s name in the library. Ms. Walker inquired about the donor. Ms. Padilla Parra stated that this information is withheld initially.  She will inquire about any other stipulations and inform them that we require the donor’s name before we can accept their gift.  She stated that The Board must approve the transaction and that it is possible that work on the library could begin this winter.

 

Item #6          Family Math NightLeticia Padilla Parra, Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra asked that this item be tabled until the next meeting due to the late hour. 

 

Announcements: None

Next Regular Meeting: TBA

 

Adjournment: 7:57 a.m.

 

On MOTION of Robin Brenneisen, SECONDED by Tiffany Walker and CARRIED, the meeting was adjourned at 7:57 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by Cheryl Perkins, Council Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. C. 

 

Treasurer/CFO’s Report

(See presentation slides)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. D. 

 

Directors’ Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.1.

FENTON AVENUE CHARTER SCHOOL (FACS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

The mission of Fenton Avenue Charter School is to further instill the joy of learning by creating an environment that promotes confident, self-reliant, interdependent learners who become productive, contributing citizens of the community.

 

State Charter Number:  30

 

 

Enrollment and Attendance:

 

 

 

 

TK 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade Total    ADA%

 13            231                 231                 252               727                97.66%    

 

Enrollment at Fenton Avenue Charter School is 727 students with ADA at 97.66%. Enrollment has increased by one student since last month. We will continue seeking ways to increase our enrollment. 

 

Instruction

 

Parent Conference Week: FACS completed first trimester parent conferences in all 31 classrooms in November.  Parents met with teachers and support staff throughout the week to discuss progress and strategies.  Attendance was excellent.

 

English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC) Training: Barbara Aragón and Veronica Ramos attended an ELPAC training in November to prepare for the 2019 administration of the ELPAC. FACS will administer the ELPAC Summative to English Learners from February 4-8, 2019.

 

District Validation Review (DVR): FACS underwent its District Validation Review on Thursday, November 29, 2018, and overall successful results were reported by the team. The one-day visit consisted of interviews with stakeholders, parent and teacher surveys, classroom observations, a review of student records and Welligent reports. FACS was well represented by our DVR leaders, Judy Werner, FCPS Special Education Coordinator, and Otilia Lopez, FACS School Psychologist. One commendation mentioned was that the school well prepared for the DVR visit.  Another commendation mentioned was the excellent collaboration between general education and special education staff. The staff and parent interviews, as well as the classroom observations went well. They were very impressed with the excellent teaching and the sound systems, technology available in the classrooms. One team member even commented that she learned some math while observing in a 4th grade classroom! 

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: FACS teachers will administer the Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments for the first time from January 22nd – February 1st. This is exciting because the data from this testing administration allow us to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment window and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. Teachers will analyze student scores to differentiate their instruction based on student need. Teachers and administration will discuss this data during mid-year goal setting meetings in February.

 

Personnel

 

Earned Increase Walkthrough Week: Thank you to the teaching staff for welcoming the observation teams into their classrooms in November. It was a wonderful experience and we saw evidence of hard work, high expectations and attention to detail. It was exciting to see so much small group instruction, as well as increased use to technology.

 

Probationary Teacher Observations: All probationary staff completed their formal first semester observations in November and early December.  FACS has five probationary staff members who participated in the observation process.  It was a successful and productive observation cycle.

 

School Community

 

Halloween Parade: On October 31, 2018, all classrooms participated in the FACS Halloween Parade. Students and parents thoroughly enjoyed the wide variety of wonderful and very creative costumes on display. The parade was incredibly well attended by parents, and enjoyed by all. A huge thank you to Veronica Ramos as well as all of the teachers and front office staff for all of their assistance with making this happen!

 

Winter Performances: Our annual Winter Performance for parents will be held on Thursday, December 13, 2018. Teachers and students are busy preparing for this performance.

 

Social Emotional Learning: FACS has continued to receive bi-weekly visits from Fiona “FCPS Therapy Dog”. The Paws and Learn organization also visited classrooms.  Paws and Learn is a non-profit organization that delivers lessons regarding humane education and animal care. Thank you to Barbara Aragón for continuing to find meaningful ways of implementing and supplementing our Social Emotional Learning program.

 

Facility Update

 

Playground Resurfacing:  Over the fall break, the playground at FACS received a much needed resurfacing to repair the large cracks that had formed in numerous parts of the play yard. These had become a safety concern and needed to be repaired. Thank you to Fernando Martinez, Jaime Osornia, and the maintenance team for ensuring that the resurfacing and striping was completed properly, and meets the high quality standard that Fenton is accustomed to.

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

    1. Fire Drill
    2. 8:30-10:00 Neighborhood Action Council Meeting ñ Family Center
    3. 1:45-2:30 Winter Holiday Performance
    4. Minimum Day #2 ñ Dismissal at 12:00 noon
    5. 6:30 am Staff Holiday Breakfast
    6. Winter Break

 

 

Item II.D.2.

SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL (SMBCCS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School promotes academic achievement in a collaborative environment that creates self-confident, self-reliant learners who will become positive contributors to their communities.

 

State Charter Number:  446

 

ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE

 

As of November 30, 2018:

 

Monthly Attendance Average- 97.9

Cumulative Attendance Average- 98.2 

 

Pre-K

TK

K

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

Total

11/30/18

85

23

117

113

136

137

129

157

78

975

 

OFFICIAL RELEASE OF 2017-2018 SUMMATIVE ELPAC SUMMARY REPORTS

 

2017–18 Summative ELPAC summary reports were released to the public on the California Department of Education (CDE) on October 26th.  The table below compares the average percentage of K-6th grade students receiving an overall ELPAC level score of 3 or 4 at Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School, within the Los Angeles Unified School District, and throughout the state.

 

Performance Level

SMBCCS

LAUSD

State

Level 4

39.13

28.80

30.24

Level 3

39.48

35.08

36.84

Average

39.30

31.94

33.54

 

An overall score at level 3 or 4 is an essential criterion when determining whether reclassification guidelines are met by students.  An average of 5.76 percent more students at Santa Monica scored at these levels than the state of CA and 7.36 percent more than students in LAUSD.  Performing well on the ELPAC as compared to LAUSD allows the school to stay on track with reclassification percentage expectations set by the District and reviewed during oversight visits.

     

INSTRUCTION

 

NWEA MAP® Middle of Year (MOY) Assessments – January 8th to January 25th 

Mid-Year MAP testing will begin immediately after students return from winter vacation on January 8th.  Results from testing will be reviewed during Mid-Year Professional Goal Setting meetings set to begin February 4th.  During meetings, teachers will have an opportunity to identify student growth as compared to their Beginning of Year assessments and identify 4-6 “focus” students in preparation for end of year MAP testing for all students, and SBAC testing in grades 3-6.

 

Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Self-Study Visit, March 2020

Santa Monica was granted six year WASC-accreditation in July 2014 and participated in a mid-cycle visit in February 2017.  During its mid-cycle visit, the school was commended for the dedication of all stakeholders to work together to ensure the academic success of each student, continued efforts to review student data and adjust curriculum and instruction as needed, building community partnerships, the use and accessibility of technology in all classrooms to enhance student learning, and the growth and achievement of English Language Learners.  Our six-year term will end June 2020 and we have now scheduled tentative dates in the beginning of March 2020 to participate in a Self-Study Visit with the hopes of being granted our next six-year term of accreditation.

 

Professional Development Day #5 – Benchmark Advance and Adaptations for Special Education Students 

On January 7th, Santa Monica will hold its fifth professional development day of the year.  Teachers will receive a refresher training from Benchmark Advance that will revisit the training received last year and reflect on teacher pacing, scheduling, and instruction within the Benchmark format.  Teachers will also participate in a training led by our Special Education team that will focus on daily assignment and Benchmark and My Math assessment adaptations for students with special needs.

 

November-December Professional Development Attendance:

SMBCCS staff continued to participate in various professional development opportunities in November and December:

 

    • ïCalifornia Association of School Psychologists (CASP) Convention, November 8-10 (Attendees – Kristine Khachian, Tashi Miller)
    • ïLAUSD Charter Operated Programs - Effective Scheduling: Practical Strategies for Finding Extra Instructional Time During the School Day, November 27th (Attendees - Grade Level Lead Teachers)
    • ïApple – Everyone Can Create, November 29th (Attendees – Gabriela Arroyo, Walter Gomez, Jennifer Nishimoto, Cary Rabinowitz)
    • ïCalifornia Science Education Conference, November 30-December 2 (Attendees – Donald Ausherman)
    • ïBehavior Safety-Care Emergency (BSET) Training, December 6-7, Attendees - Sirui Thomassian, Walter Gomez, Toni Frear, Roldan Ramirez

 

personnel

 

Instructional Coach Support to Probationary Teachers

The addition of our two organization-wide instructional coaches has opened the door for increased support to our probationary teachers.  Santa Monica teachers in their first and second year have met with their designated instructional coach and the Director during an initial planning meeting to determine focus areas of development.  Moving forward, instructional coaches will schedule meetings and observations to assist and monitor their growth as Fenton teachers.  Probationary teachers will receive their second formal evaluation in the Spring of 2019.

 

Mid-Year Teacher Assistants Evaluations

Teachers at SMBCCS are completing teacher assistant (TA) evaluations for Fall 2018.  Teachers work as a grade level to complete one evaluation for their assigned TA.  They then conference with their TA and provide commendations and recommendations for performance in the Spring semester.  TAs are scored on a scale of 1-5 with a score of 3 considered as “meeting job requirements.”  TAs are evaluated on attendance, working with students, performance within the classroom setting, and general professionalism.  Absences and tardies are also reviewed during this meeting as well as transcript submissions and Spring placements. 

 

Community Relations 

 

Parent Volunteer Orientations – December 4th and December 5th  

The school held two parent volunteer orientations on December 4th and 5th.  The purpose of our parent volunteer orientations is to welcome and celebrate parents interested in volunteering at Santa Monica and to review procedures and policies set forth in the Volunteer Handbook.  In an effort to ensure clear expectations to all volunteers at the school, all parents will be required to attend an orientation prior to beginning as a volunteer.

 

Family Code Night, December 4th

On the evening of Tuesday, December 4th Santa Monica held its first Family Code Night event.  Students and families had the opportunity to interact with codeSpark Academy's Foos application in each of our Foos World-themed Kindergarten classrooms.  In our auditorium, students raced Dash and Dot robots and completed obstacle courses; and in our iLabs, attendees will build on their computer science proficiencies as they interact with PixelBot and Lego Robotics.  Los Tres Hermanos and Kona Ice food trucks were on campus to serve families and we held fundraisers to support our Robotics Team’s trip to the Rally in the Valley event this year.

 

Thank you to our STEAM Leads, Gaby Arroyo, Jazmin Luna, Jennifer Nishimoto, Holly Putnam, and AJ Smith for taking the lead in preparing for this event and to all teachers and parents who volunteered their help.

 

2018-2019 SMBCCS Banner Campaign

Santa Monica and Strategic Media are once again teaming up to build and further strengthen our school’s narrative in the community.  Our marketing campaign will focus on the increased integration of technology within daily instruction as well as our continued partnerships and community engagement with organizations like Paramount and 9Dots, and new organizations like codeSpark.  

 

Sonja Brown and her team from Strategic Media were on campus on Tuesday, December 4th taking photos of our students to help mold and build on our school’s STEAM narrative.

 

Other examples of community engagement:

 

    • ïWinter Holiday Performances, December 11-12
    • ïWeekly Parent Coding Classes in our iLabs (Wednesdays)
    • ïCoffee with the Principal, February 13th

 

FACILITIES AND SAFETY

 

Great Los Angeles County Vector Control to Combat Mosquito Nuisance at School

At the end of October, Santa Monica contacted the Greater LA County Vector Control.  They are a public health agency in LA County that works with the Department of Public Health.  Our campus was surveyed just before Halloween given our continuing concerns regarding the mosquito nuisance.  The agency representative provided a great deal of valuable information that was communicated to staff and pointed out many easy fixes that were made on campus to deny mosquitoes access to water to breed.  Standing water on campus was also treated to combat continued breeding.  Since our visit, we’ve seen a noticeable decrease in the amount of mosquitoes on campus.

 

Drinking Water Quality ProgramLAUSD Maintenance and Operations

The Drinking Water Quality Program is scheduled to sample the water at SMBCCS over the winter break.  The program’s scope will be to survey all drinking fountain water at the school, including fountains in classrooms, to ensure they do not exceed lead-level criteria set forth by the Environment Protection Agency (EPA). This is a preventative visit paid for by bond funds to ensure a continued safe and healthy learning environment for our students.  Per LAUSD, this survey will come with no financial impact to Santa Monica.

 

Completed Renovation of the Boys Bathroom

Thank you to our FCPS Maintenance team as they have completed the Boys Bathroom on campus adjacent to our kitchen.  The renovation included the installation of larger tiling on the floor and wall for ease in cleaning, and updated plumbing, toilets and sink.  The bathroom’s ceiling and lighting were also updated and a fresh layer of coat was applied.  Our team did an exceptional job on the bathroom.

 

Upcoming Events:

 

    • ïSemester Awards, January 22-25 
    • ïProfessional Goal Setting Conferences, February 4th – 15th 
    • ïLAUSD Annual Performance-Based Oversight Visit, February 20th
    • ïEarned Increase Walkthroughs, February 25th - March 1s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.3.

FENTON PRIMARY CENTER (FPC)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Primary Center is to cultivate a love of learning by fostering an environment that promotes self-discovery, independence and an awareness of the connectedness between self and others.

 

State Charter Number:  911

 

General Information on Enrollment and Attendance

 

Fenton Primary Center Enrollment as of November 30, 2018 (TK-2):

 

Transitional Kindergarten

Kindergarten

1st Grade

2nd Grade

Total

42

202

234

224

702

 

Actual Daily Attendance for the Month (ADA): 97.88%       Cumulative ADA for the Year: 98.24%

 

Implementation of Benchmark Advance as the New Language Arts Curriculum: Fenton Primary Center first announced the transition to a new language arts curriculum, Benchmark Advance, on October 5, 2018. Each grade level has collaborated tirelessly on the implementation of the new curriculum to have the most effective impact on learning. The school’s implementation and professional development was provided in collaboration with Benchmark Advance, Dr. Riddick, and our FCPS Coaches, Mrs. Elvira and Mrs. Ferri. The school’s lead teachers and leadership team were given an orientation training on October 22nd to begin the planning and implementation. As of November 26, 2018, in less than two months, Fenton Primary Center has fully implemented Benchmark Advance in kindergarten through 2nd grade.

 

Special Education and District Validation Review: On October 30th Fenton Primary Center had an oversight visit by the Los Angeles Unified School District to review compliance and implementation of the Fenton primary Center special education program. The oversight review took most of one day and the end result was extremely positive. Fenton Primary Center’s Special Education was very organized and all compliance items were met. The only minor correction was in the way some of the student goals were written. The oversight team wanted to see more details in the goals. A special thanks to the FPC Special Education staff, Lead teacher Mrs. Cardenas, FCPS Special Education Coordinator Mrs. Werner, and lead administrator Mrs. Kaufman for all of their time and effort in making this visit a success.

 

Fall Teacher Earned Increase Walkthroughs: The first round of Earned Increase Walkthroughs was completed for all teaching staff the week of November 5th. These 5-minute walkthroughs provided an opportunity to observe and gather information on teaching strategies, classroom environment, and student learning. This activity allows the school’s leadership team to observe the overall implementation of the school’s instructional program.  

 

Parent Conferences: The first trimester reporting period ended with parent conferences the week of November 12, 2018. The school had parents participate in a one-to-one conference with their child’s teacher. Parent conferences are important in communicating each child’s academic strengths and needs to their parents. Parents appreciate this time to discuss their child’s progress with the teacher. 

 

National Family Literacy Day: On November 1st Fenton Primary Center participated in National Family Literacy Day by providing literacy awareness projects to students and parents. We had over sixty parents participate in 15-20 minute reading activities throughout the day. Parents came to classrooms and read to students their favorite children’s book. The school also had special visitors from the Lake View Terrace Library, guests from Reading is Fundamental, and our famous therapy dog “Fiona.” This day also marked the beginning of the school’s literacy project of 30 consecutive days of parents reading to their children. Fenton Primary Center continues to find ways of making literacy a priority in school and at home.  

 

Great California Shakeout: FPC participated in the 2018 California Shake Out on October 19, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. The school performed a basic drill with a practice of drop and hold and evacuation. The drill was very successful thanks to the work and preparation of the safety committee and all staff’s attention to detail in our emergency plan.

 

October 31st – Halloween: All of Fenton Primary Center’s kindergarten parents were invited to see students parade in their costumes on the school playground on October 31st. The school has not allowed this kind of activity in the past due to the limited space and capacity of the building. The event was extremely organized with the support of the teachers, administrators, support staff, custodial, and security staff. It was a huge success and parents truly enjoyed the event.

 

Animals and Learning: FPC continues to include animals as often as possible to teach social studies and focus on the social and emotional learning of young children. The school continues to have weekly visits from Fiona “FPC Therapy Dog”. This past month FPC classrooms had visits from the Paws and Learn organization. Paws and Learn is a non-profit organization that delivers lessons regarding humane education and animal care. These are just some ways Fenton Primary Center continues to find unique ways of implementing and supplementing our Social Emotional Learning program.

 

Upcoming Dates:

 

12/3/17-12/14/18 Mutt-i-grees Food and Blanket Drive

12/6/18 Chorus Winter Performance (8:30 a.m.)

The Science of Bubbles Assemblies (12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m.)

12/14/18 FPC Staff Holiday Breakfast (6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.)

12/17/18 – 1/8/19 Students on Winter Break

1/7/19 School Site Council Meeting

1/17/19 LAUSD Oversight Visit

1/21/19 Martin Luther King Jr. Observance – No School

1/31/19 FCPS Board Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.4.

FENTON STEM ACADEMY (STEM)  

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton STEM Academy: Elementary Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math is successful student engagement and achievement through the implementation of a curriculum that interconnects science, technology, engineering, and math across all disciplines, including art, music, language arts and social studies.  

 

State Charter Number:  1605

 

Enrollment 

 

 

Kinder

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

12/06/18

63

46

47

36

47

77

316

98.1%

98.2%

 

Charter Renewal

 

On November 27, 2018, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) Board of Education voted on consent to renew the Fenton STEM Academy for 5 years, beginning July 1, 2019, until June 30, 2024, to serve up to 600 students in grades TK-5, without any corresponding benchmarks. Congratulations to the Fenton STEM Academy, and the entire FCPS community for this significant accomplishment. We are thrilled for the opportunity to continue to serve the students of Sun Valley and its nearby area residents.  

 

Instruction

                                      

District Validation Review: Fenton STEM Academy received positive results from the November 28th LAUSD District Validation Review. The LAUSD team commended Fenton STEM for being incredibly prepared for this review. They commented on the school's ability to meet the educational needs of all students and strong policies and procedures. The staff and parent interviews, as well as the classroom observations were excellent. After the classroom observations, the reviewers were impressed by the authenticity and special education knowledge level of our staff. Judy Werner and Maria Cordero spent the majority of the day with the team reviewing student records, reports, and answering questions about our special education program. Thank you to those who assisted with the group interview, records review, and classroom observations. It is validating to see the district recognize the commitment and precision of our special education program and policies. 

 

Grade Level STEM Challenges: In an effort to integrate STEM learning with other subject matter, all grade levels at Fenton STEM Academy participate in monthly STEM Challenges. These challenges are often aligned with current Benchmark or My Math lessons and are showcased each week in the weekly newsletter. Students are instructed to follow the 5E model, which includes Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate, as well as the Engineering Design Process. This monthly challenge differs from the bi-yearly STEAM Schoolwide Challenge, as grade levels are given freedom to choose a STEM challenge that corresponds with grade level lessons and pacing. Recent challenges include the following:

 

Kindergarten – After the conclusion of their science unit about apples, students designed, sketched, and constructed “Apple Boats” to explore the topic of buoyancy and tested whether their boats would sink or float. This activity is covered by the NGSS under Engineering Design, particularly under K-2-ETS1-2 - Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.  

 

First Grade – After reading the book Little Red Riding Hood, students worked in groups of four to create a durable basket that could hold a lunch for Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother. Each group sketched a model of their basket and used popsicle sticks, pipe cleaner, and tape to construct their baskets. They tested each basket by measuring how many counting blocks it held. After testing each group improved their basket to successfully hold even more counting blocks.

 

Second Grade - Students were introduced to an adapted version of an original story called, Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs. In the story, the dinosaurs set up their home to be a trap for the curious Goldilocks. Students followed the Engineering Design Process, which required them to ask, imagine, plan, create, and improve on their design of their dinosaur. Students were given a variety of materials, including marshmallows, straws, scissors, and toothpicks, to create a free-standing dinosaur of their choice. The students showed great enthusiasm as they completed the challenge to create and share about their extinct creations.  

 

Third Grade – Students explored the Engineering Design Process by constructing a geodesic gumdrop dome. The driving question was to determine which structure was the strongest, a square or a triangle. The students used gumdrops and toothpicks to test the strength of both the square and triangle shape. Before the experiment, students made a prediction as to which structure would hold up to the “push” test, in which students would use two fingers to apply pressure in a downward force to the shape. Next, the students built each structure, tested their prediction, and recorded the results. In the end, the results concluded that the triangle shape was the strongest.

 

Fourth Grade – Students have been practicing their scientific acumen. One example of this is the students’ refinement of their scientific academic vocabulary. The fourth graders were asked to build a ramp and measure how far a toy car rolled. The students did this activity three times, varying the height of the ramp each time. Students had to make a hypothesis about the optimal height of the cars ramp. After collecting data, the students determined if their hypothesis was correct or incorrect. Additionally, the students had to determine the constants and variables of their trials. This challenging activity required the students to engage in meaningful discussion and practice their scientific vocabulary skills with their peers.

 

Fifth Grade - Students explored the sun, moon, and stars as they began their first Mystery Science unit. Students began by learning why the sun rises and sets. They then created a model that depicted that the sun isn’t moving, but rather the Earth is spinning. Students learned about the sun’s role in timekeeping and how our ancestors divided the day into hours. Students had the opportunity to make their very own shadow clock. The lesson continued with why different constellations are visible during different seasons and the scholars even made their own Universe in a Box!

 

Professional Development Day 4: In an effort to build upon what was recently gained at the Responsive Classroom Conference, the January 7th FCPS Professional Day 4 will be dedicated to a full day workshop on this program led by a Responsive Classroom trainer. We look forward to finding more ways to increase our ability to reach students emotionally and intellectually.

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments are scheduled for January 8th – 25th.  The assessment window is particularly critical, as its data will be used to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment window and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. In an effort to prepare students for the May SBAC Summative Assessment, teachers will analyze student scores to strategically assign intervention groups and adjust and differentiate instructional pacing per student need.  Teachers and administration will discuss data during Mid-Year Goal Setting Conferences set to begin early February. 

 

Personnel

 

Earned Increase Walkthroughs: The first round of Earned Increase Walkthroughs has been completed for all teaching staff. These walkthroughs provided an opportunity to observe and gather information on teaching strategies, classroom environment, and student learning. Teachers commented on the benefits of peer observation.

 

Second Semester Formal Observation Lessons:  Second semester formal observation lessons will begin for probationary certificated staff members January 14th – March 8th. Educators will participate in a pre-observation and post-observation meeting to discuss instructional goals and reflect on lesson outcomes. Second semester lessons will focus on Explicit Direct Instruction to deliver Mathematics lessons that meet California Common Core standards. 

 

Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings: As practiced in year’s past, all STEM teachers in grades K-5 will participate in mid-year goal setting meetings. These meetings are a follow up to the goal setting meetings that were held in the beginning of the year. Mid-year meetings will analyze data collected from the winter MAP testing administration. This review of data will allow teachers to target instruction in an effort to best prepare students for the spring CAASPP testing, as well as provide intervention and enrichment. Mid-year goal setting meetings will take place February 4-6th

 

School Community

 

The Great Kindness Challenge Week: The Great Kindness Challenge Week will take place January 14-18. This weeklong event is dedicated to promoting a culture of kindness and compassion across our school community. Last year, over 15,000 schools participated in over 90 countries, equaling over 10 million students. During Kindness Week, students will participate in classroom lessons and activities centered on kindness. 

 

Semester Award Assemblies: Fenton STEM Academy parents will be invited to attend Semester Award Assemblies January 22nd – 29th. Awards will be given to students that have demonstrated achievement in overall Academics, Improvement, Citizenship, Leadership, and Attendance. 

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

    • ïJanuary 8-25 – NWEA MAP Winter Testing
    • ïJanuary 22-29 – Semester Awards Assemblies 
    • ïFebruary 8 – Spirit Day #6
    • ïFebruary 4-6 – Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings
    • ïFebruary 1 – Enrollment begins for the 2018-2019 school year
    • ïFebruary 13 – LAUSD Oversight Visit           

 

 

 

Item II.D.5.

FENTON CHARTER LEADERSHIP ACADEMY (FCLA)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Academy for Social and Emotional Learning is to nurture the development of responsible, thoughtful citizens in an increasingly interdependent global society by creating environments in which students are challenged to explore, to create, to make decisions while actively participating in and being accountable for their learning.  

 

State Charter Number:  1613

 

Enrollment 

 

 

TK/Kinder

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

12/0618

84

69

69

65

43

330

96.95%

97.7%

 

Instruction

                                      

Responsive Classroom Conference: On November 8-10, 2018, the FCLA Focus Leads and FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinators attended the Responsive Classroom National Conference in Minneapolis, MN. The team attended sessions focused on classroom routines, language, and trauma. Responsive Classroom is a K-8th grade approach to teaching and learning with emphasis on blending social and emotional learning on academic learning. Research shows that the Responsive Classroom approach is associated with higher academic achievement, improved teacher- student interactions, and higher quality instruction. The team gained much insight during this comprehensive conference, specifically the power of teacher language to enhance behavior management, engage academics, and establish a positive school community. Conference information was shared with staff during the November 28th staff meeting with more information sharing sessions planned in the future. Thank you to the FCLA Focus Leads, Krista Casanova and Kate Hetu for spearheading this effort to help both FCLA and STEM develop more responsive teaching. They will continue to lead the way as we refine and enhance our instructional model. 

 

Professional Development Day 4: In an effort to build upon what was recently gained at the Responsive Classroom Conference, the January 7th FCPS Professional Day 4 will be dedicated to a full day workshop on this program led by a Responsive Classroom trainer. We look forward to finding more ways to increase our ability to reach students emotionally and intellectually.

 

 

 

Service Learning Projects: TK-4th grade teachers have begun coordinating and planning their Service Learning Projects for the 2018-2019 school year.  The majority of grade levels will work with the same organizations as last year which include, The Jester and Pharley Phund, Villa Scalabrini Retirement Home, Totally Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, and several other non-profit organizations. Service Learning projects will run year-long with a culminating celebratory event at the April Leadership Summit. Providing opportunities for FCLA students to conduct meaningful service to address a societal need is a powerful tool to show the impact individuals have on making a difference in our world.  

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments are scheduled for January 8th – 25th.  The assessment window is particularly critical, as its data will be used to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment window and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. In an effort to prepare students for the May SBAC Summative Assessment, teachers will analyze student scores to strategically assign intervention groups and adjust and differentiate instructional pacing per student need.  Teachers and administration will discuss data during Mid-Year Goal Setting Conferences set to begin early February. 

 

Personnel

 

Earned Increase Walkthroughs: The first round of Earned Increase Walkthroughs has been completed for all teaching staff. These walkthroughs provided an opportunity to observe and gather information on teaching strategies, classroom environment, and student learning. Teachers commented on the benefits of peer observation.

 

Second Semester Formal Observation Lessons:  Second semester formal observation lessons will begin for probationary certificated staff members January 14th – March 8th. Educators will participate in a pre-observation and post-observation meeting to discuss instructional goals and reflect on lesson outcomes. Second semester lessons will focus on Explicit Direct Instruction to deliver Mathematics lessons that meet California Common Core standards. 

 

Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings: As practiced in year’s past, all FCLA teachers in grades K-5 will participate in mid-year goal setting meetings. These meetings are a follow up to the goal setting meetings that were held in the beginning of the year. Mid-year meetings will analyze data collected from the winter MAP testing administration. This review of data will allow teachers to target instruction in an effort to best prepare students for the spring CAASPP testing, as well as provide intervention and enrichment. Mid-year goal setting meetings will take place February 4-6th.   

 

School Community

 

The Great Kindness Challenge Week: The Great Kindness Challenge Week will take place January 14-18. This weeklong event is dedicated to promoting a culture of kindness and compassion across our school community. Last year, over 15,000 schools participated in over 90 countries, equaling over 10 million students. During Kindness Week, students will participate in classroom lessons and activities centered on kindness. 

 

Semester Award Assemblies: Fenton Charter Leadership Academy parents will be invited to attend Semester Award Assemblies January 22nd – 29th. Awards will be given to students that have demonstrated achievement in overall Academics, Improvement, Citizenship, Leadership, and Attendance. 

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

    • ïJanuary 8-25 – NWEA MAP Winter Testing
    • ïJanuary 22-29 – Semester Awards Assemblies 
    • ïJanuary 24 – District Validation Review (DVR)
    • ïFebruary 1 – Enrollment begins for the 2018-2019 school year
    • ïFebruary 7 – LAUSD Oversight Visit           
    • ïFebruary 8 – Spirit Day #6
    • ïFebruary 4-6 – Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings
    • ïFebruary 19 – ELPAC Testing begins 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. E.

 

Chief Academic Officer’s Report

(See presentation slides)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. F.

 

Executive Director’s Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.F.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS (FCPS)

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 6, 2018

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes. 

 

CCSA:

 

“CCSA Calls for Closure of Seven Academically Underperforming Charter Schools”

Public Call Demonstrates Charter Schools' Steadfast Commitment to Accountability

Sacramento, CA - For nearly a decade, the California Charter Schools Association (CCSA) has publicly called each year for the non-renewal of chronically underperforming charter public schools. Today, CCSA called for the non-renewal and closure of seven charter schools across the state. 

A commitment to student learning is woven into the DNA of California's charter schools. In exchange for the freedom and flexibility to tailor teaching to meet students' individual needs, charter schools agree to be held to higher standards. No other type of public school has a greater commitment to accountability for its student outcomes. 

"We want all schools to provide a high-quality education to their students. And we believe all public schools should be as accountable as charters are to the public for their results. When charter schools fail to help students succeed academically, they should close," said Jed Wallace, president and CEO of CCSA. "We urge the school districts that authorize these charter schools to hold up their end of the bargain and close underperforming schools that have failed repeatedly to support student learning outcomes."

Recommending a school's closure is a difficult decision but CCSA is committed to working with closing schools to find new options that will better meet the academic needs of students and families.

"Charter schools in California aren't about bureaucracy or protecting the status quo," said Elizabeth Robitaille, SVP, School Performance, Development, and Support of CCSA. "Rather, charter schools innovate, they help students accelerate their learning and thrive, and families can choose the learning model that works best for their kids. Every five years they must work with their authorizing school district or county office of education to prove how they are supporting student learning. When charter schools fail to demonstrate they are increasing student learning, they must be held accountable, plain and simple." 

As the membership and advocacy organization that supports the 1,323 charter schools in California in 2018-19, CCSA has used an academic accountability framework to guide its advocacy for renewing and replicating schools for nearly a decade. Guided by its members, CCSA worked to establish minimum criteria for charter renewal using a framework that assesses a multi-year view of a school's performance on multiple student outcome measures. CCSA starts with initial filters generated by publicly available data (State Rank, Similar Students Rank, Growth and Postsecondary Readiness). For charter schools below the initial filters, CCSA does a deep-dive Multiple Measure Review to ensure charter schools have the opportunity to provide additional compelling evidence of growth in student achievement.

The following schools fall below CCSA's minimum renewal criteria for the 2018-19 school year and are chronically underperforming on several other academic performance measures. 

Charter Public Schools Below CCSA's Minimum Criteria for Renewal 

Charter Schools up for Renewal in 2018-19 (based on 5-year charter term)

 

 

School Name

Authorizer

County

Delta Charter

New Jerusalem Elementary School District

San Joaquin

ICEF Inglewood Middle Charter Academy

Inglewood Unified School District

Los Angeles

Independence Charter Academy

Helendale Elementary School District

San Bernardino

New Jerusalem Elementary

New Jerusalem Elementary School District

San Joaquin

SCALE Leadership Academy

Acton Agua-Dulce Unified School District

Los Angeles

Valiant Academy of Southern California

Dehesa Elementary School District

San Diego

Vista Oaks Charter

Byron Union Elementary School District

Contra Costa

Spotlight on New Jerusalem Elementary School District: 

Occasionally, charter schools and/or their authorizing school districts will seek to renew charter schools early (out of their 5-year cycle). CCSA's position is that charter schools should have five years to demonstrate results and should be held accountable for their performance during that charter term. If authorizers seek to renew charter schools early/under-the-radar, then CCSA calls for the authorizer to hold these schools to account in their fifth year and to revoke these schools due to their chronic underperformance. This is the case with both Delta Charter and New Jerusalem Elementary, both of which were renewed early and out-of-cycle by their authorizer (New Jerusalem Elementary School District).

A Lack of Meaningful Accountability for Traditional Public Schools: 

 The focus of CCSA's Annual Public Call for Non-Renewal announcement is to hold underperforming charter schools accountable. Yet there is no similar accountability for district-run traditional public schools' performance. This means chronically underperforming district-run schools can languish year after year to the profound detriment of the students they serve without any deep dive review or consequence. 

Applying CCSA's Academic Accountability Framework, CCSA identified more than a thousand district-run schools across the state that are underperforming on publicly available measures of academic performance. These schools have low State Ranks, low Similar Students Ranks, low postsecondary readiness and lack of improvement over time on state test scores, and would require a Multiple Measure Review deep dive under CCSA's accountability framework. In fact, there are 14% of traditional public schools below the initial filters of CCSA's accountability framework, compared to 12% of charter schools. The public can view CCSA's Regional Snapshots to find the percentage of traditional public and charter schools meeting CCSA's initial filters by district, city, and county.

If these district-run schools were charter schools, once every five years they would be responsible for demonstrating how they are increasing student learning. While the state launched a new California School Dashboard, it is unclear how many schools will be identified under its numerous measures as underperforming and thus eligible for support. Traditional public schools identified for "support" under the Dashboard will be asked to reflect on their performance for extended periods of time, but without any real accountability, consequence, or clear pathway toward improved access to student learning. We call on school districts to hold a higher bar for their district-run schools to ensure all public schools are as effective as possible in supporting California's students to learn and succeed.

CCSA's Accountability Framework: 

To meet the academic threshold for CCSA renewal advocacy support in 2018-19, a charter school needed to meet one of the four criteria below. Charters meeting ANY initial filter OR showing academic success through the Multiple Measure Review met the academic threshold to receive CCSA's full advocacy support for renewal or replication. The charter schools included in CCSA's Public Call for Non-Renewal did not meet any of the initial criteria and the Multiple Measure Review did not yield evidence of student outcome success and growth in achievement beyond that which is seen at other schools or the schools refused to participate in this secondary review. More information is available at http://www.ccsa.org/accountability.

Initial Filters: 

    • Status measure: State Rank of 4 or above in 2 of the last 3 years (2016, 2017, 2018)
    • Schools performing in the bottom 5th percentile of performance statewide on the status measure in 2 of the last 3 years were considered "below criteria" and needed to participate in CCSA's Multiple Measure Review in order to receive CCSA's advocacy support for renewal.
    • Growth/ Postsecondary readiness:
    • Elementary/middle schools: Improvement on CAASPP (Distance from Level 3) over the last 3 years at/above the 75th percentile of growth statewide. (For the 2015-16 to 2017-18 period, the 75th percentile of 3-year growth was 12 scale score points on CAASSP, averaging ELA and math.) 
    • High schools: 75 percent or more of 12th grade graduates completing all "a-g" requirements in 2 of the last 3 years (2016, 2017, 2018) 
    • Similar Students: Similar Students Rank of 4 or above in 2 of the last 3 years (2016, 2017, 2018)

Multiple Measure Review:

    1. Schools below ALL the initial filters or in the bottom 5 percent statewide on SBAC can share outcomes aligned to California's 8 state priorities as described in the school's Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP). Schools can tell their own story of success by choosing measures most closely aligned to their mission.

CCSA's Minimum Academic Accountability Criteria would not apply if a school is designated as Dashboard Alternative School Status "DASS," is less than four years old, or has less than 30 valid test takers.

“California's Charter Schools Grow, Over 1,300 New and Expanded Charter Schools Open in 2018”

Sacramento, CA - The California Charter Schools Association (CCSA) announced today (November 8, 2018) that an estimated 660,000 students are enrolled in 1,323 charter public schools in California for the 2018-19 school year. This year the equivalent of 70 new schools opened across the state. The 70 schools include 63 new startups and replications, and seven planned significant expansions of existing schools.

The charter schools association includes significant expansions of existing schools in its annual tally because some expansions are similar to opening an entirely new school. For example, a K-5 elementary school expanding to serve grades 6-8 is very similar to opening an entirely new middle school. Another school might double their capacity in the current grades they serve. CCSA also considers that type of expansion the equivalent of a new school. 

"It is gratifying to see that we have so many new schools this year because it shows the demand from parents who want more options for their children," said Jed Wallace, president and CEO of CCSA. "Even as we see resistance from authorizing districts, we have dedicated charter school leaders and parents who are undeterred in their fight to open a school that puts kids first."

The 70 new and replication schools and significant expansions added about 12,600 new students to the total number of students enrolled in California charter schools. Together with growing enrollment in existing charter schools, there is a total estimated increase of about 30,000 students in California charter schools for 2018-19 compared to 2017-18 (where the total was 630,000 students enrolled in 1,276 charter schools). 

In addition to the equivalent of 70 new school equivalents, there were 44 charter schools that opened as a result of the Anderson Union HSD v Shasta ruling. This ruling forced many non-classroom-based charter schools to re-petition their resource centers as new charter schools. Although these schools will be assigned new charter numbers by the California Department of Education, CCSA decided to separate them in its annual growth count because most were in existence last year as resource centers. 

There were 68 charter schools that closed last year. A number of these were affiliated with the Anderson Union HSD v Shasta ruling. California still remains the state with the greatest number of charter schools, and the most students enrolled in charters, anywhere in the country. This school year, the Los Angeles region had the largest charter school growth with 25 new charter schools opening. The Southern California region saw the second highest growth with 17 new charter schools. 

 

 

 

 

 

State:

 

From School Services of California – 

 

“LAO Forecast Modest Proposition 98 Growth in 2019-20”

In its 2019-20 Budget: Proposition 98 Outlook report, the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) estimates a modest increase to the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee for the budget year. When compared to last year’s report—which forecast revenues sufficient to fully fund the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) in 2018-19 and then some—this year’s report is sobering.

 

Proposition 98

Once again providing a supplemental report on Proposition 98, the LAO’s analysis concludes that the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee is down $226 million in 2017-18 and $461 million in 2018-19. The decrease is mainly due to a reduction in K-12 student attendance. The 2018-19 State Budget is based upon an assumption of flat attendance; however, the LAO incorporates updated data that reflects declines in both years.

As a reminder, the 2018-19 State Budget created a new Proposition 98 true-up account: for any year in which school and community college funding ends up higher than the minimum guarantee, the state is to credit the “excess” funding to the true-up account to be used in those years when funding ends up below the minimum guarantee. If the LAO’s estimations of the minimum guarantee compared to K-14 funding are correct, $469 million would be credited to the Proposition 98 true-up account.

Despite declining enrollment, the LAO expects the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee to grow to $80.8 billion in 2019-20, an increase of $2.4 billion when compared to its revised 2018-19 funding estimates. After accounting for one-time initiatives, the LAO estimates the state will have $2.8 billion for new spending under Proposition 98 in 2019-20. By comparison, last fall the LAO forecast the state would have $5.3 billion in uncommitted funds for Proposition 98 in 2018-19.

The LAO estimates it would take $2.3 billion to provide an estimated 3.1% cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for K-14 education in 2019-20 as follows:

    • $1.9 billion for LCFF
    • $164 million for other school programs, including State Preschool
    • $239 million for community college programs

This leaves about a half billion dollars remaining for new or planned educational spending. The LAO estimates Proposition 98 will be in Test 1 in 2019-20 and create no new maintenance factor. With all maintenance factor obligations paid off as of 2017-18, increases in Proposition 98 are flattening compared to past years.

Outlook through 2022-23

As they have done previously, the LAO modeled two economic scenarios through 2022-23: a growth scenario and a recession scenario. The LAO’s growth scenario assumes personal income in California continues to grow and the stock market remains level. The recession scenario assumes a moderate recession beginning in early 2020-21.

Under this growth scenario, Proposition 98 will steadily increase to $89.2 billion in 2022-23, reflecting an average annual increase of 3.4%, which would be expected to more than cover COLA. Under the recession scenario, the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee would drop by $1 billion in both 2020-21 and 2021-22. By 2021-22, the recession scenario guarantee would be about $7.6 billion lower than the growth scenario guarantee.

The LAO notes that even under the growth scenario, the Proposition 2 school reserve will continue to have a zero balance through 2022-23, meaning local educational agencies (LEAs) will need to use their own local reserves to weather the next recession. The LAO suggests the state help LEAs prepare for the next recession by encouraging them to increase local reserves, pay down liabilities, and be cautious in increasing their ongoing spending commitments.

“California Voters Approve Six Initiatives on General Election Ballot”

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018, California voters decided the fate of eleven propositions that were put on the 2018 General Election ballot either by the State Legislature or the signature gathering process. Only one of those measures, Proposition 5, had implications for school and community college districts. Summaries of the measures, as well as their results, can be found below.

Proposition 1

With 100% of the precincts reporting, California voters approved Proposition 1 with a 54.1% vote. This measure, which was one of three that was placed on the ballot by the State Legislature, authorizes $4 billion in general obligation bonds for existing affordable housing programs for low-income residents, veterans, farmworkers, manufactured and mobile homes, infill, and transit-oriented housing.

Proposition 2

Voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 2 with a 61.1% vote. This is another measure that was placed on the ballot by the Legislature that will amend the Mental Health Services Act to fund the No Place Like Home Program, which finances housing for individuals with mental illness.

Proposition 3

Proposition 3 was one of five propositions that voters rejected on Tuesday night. The measure, which would have authorized $8.8 billion in state general obligation bonds for various infrastructure projects, was narrowly defeated by a 52.3% to 47.7% margin. The bond may have failed because voters recently approved Proposition 68 at the June Primary, which authorized $4.1 billion in general obligation bonds for similar projects.

Proposition 4

Voters passed Proposition 4 with a 60.6% vote. This measure authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds, to be repaid from the state’s General Fund, to fund grants for construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of qualifying children’s hospitals.

Proposition 5

Proposition 5, the only measure on the ballot that had direct financial implications for school and community college districts, was resoundingly defeated by voters by a 58.1% to 41.9% margin. The measure would have allowed homeowners aged 55 and older, the severely disabled, and those with disaster-destroyed properties to transfer their existing property tax base to any new home of any value, anywhere in the state, any number of times. An analysis by the Legislative Analyst’s Office, the Legislature’s nonpartisan policy and fiscal advisor, found that the annual property tax losses for school and community college districts would have grown to about $1 billion per year over time. 

Proposition 6

Voters also rejected Proposition 6 (55.1% to 44.9%), which would have effectively repealed Senate Bill 1 (Chapter 5, 2017), the gas tax increase for road and highway maintenance that Governor Brown signed into law last year. The measure would have also required the Legislature to get a majority of voters to approve new or increased state fuel and vehicle taxes. Last week, the leaders of the proposition began exploring a recall campaign against state Attorney General Xavier Becerra because they believe Becerra provided a misleading ballot title for the measure.

Proposition 7

Proposition 7, another initiative put on the ballot by the Legislature, passed with 59.9% of the vote. This measure will give the Legislature the ability to change the daylight saving time period by two-thirds vote, if the changes are consistent with federal law.

Proposition 8

Voters overwhelmingly defeated Proposition 8 by a 61.6% to 38.4% margin. This initiative would have required dialysis clinics to issue refunds to patients or patients' payers, such as insurers, for revenue above 115% of the costs of direct patient care and healthcare improvements.

*Note: Proposition 9, the measure that would have divided California into three different states, was removed from the ballot in July by the California Supreme Court due to concerns about its validity. 

Proposition 10 

Proposition 10 would have repealed the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, which would have allowed local governments to adopt rent control. However, more than 3/5 voters (61.7%) rejected the measure.

Proposition 11

Proposition 11 passed with 59.4% of the vote and allows ambulance providers to require workers to remain on-call (reachable by a portable communications device) during meal and rest breaks.

Proposition 12

Voters passed Proposition 12 with 61% of the vote. This measure establishes minimum requirements for confining certain farm animals and prohibits sales of meat and egg products from animals confined in a noncomplying manner.

“Proposed Emergency Regulatory Action on Recording and Reporting of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Due December 31, 2018”

On November 6, 2018, the Department of Industrial Regulations (DIR) released the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (Cal/OSHA) emergency regulation that requires certain employers to electronically submit Form 300A on occupational injuries and illnesses. Local educational agencies (LEAs) with over 250 employees and LEAs with between 20-249 employees that provide school bus transportation must electronically submit their Cal/OSHA Form 300A for calendar year 2017 by December 31, 2018.

Cal/OSHA will proceed with the formal rulemaking process to make the emergency regulations permanent by submitting the required documentation to the Office of Administrative Law. The rulemaking process will include a public comment period and public hearing. LEAs, however, will still have to submit their Form 300A by December 31, 2018, as stated in the proposed emergency regulation, even though it is not a permanent regulation.

To avoid recordkeeping violations by Cal/OSHA, we recommend ensuring the accuracy of your agency’s records to remain in compliance and submitting the Form 300A prior to the winter recess in order to adhere to the December 31, 2018, deadline. To read the DIR news release, see the next page.

“SBE Approves Several Changes to the Dashboard Ahead of December's Release”

At the November 8, 2018, State Board of Education (SBE) meeting, the SBE members approved several changes to the California School Dashboard (Dashboard) to prepare for its fall 2018 release, which for the first time will include performance levels for the College/Career Indicator (CCI) and the Chronic Absenteeism Indicator.

With little debate, the SBE approved all of the California Department of Education staff recommendations for the Dashboard, including:

    • Adopting Status and Change cut scores for the Chronic Absenteeism Indicator 5x5 grid, and the application of the 3x5 grid for local educational agencies (LEAs), schools, and student groups with fewer than 150 students
    • Adopting Change cut scores and the 5x5 grid for the CCI
    • Adopting Status and Change cut scores and the 5x5 grid for the high school Academic Indicator
    • Revising the Status cut scores for the Graduation Rate Indicator
    • Modifying the criteria to count students earning the Special Education certificate of completion as graduates for purposes of the alternative school graduation rate
    • Updating the criteria for identifying LEAs for differentiated assistance under the Local Control Funding Formula to incorporate the new local indicator for Access to a Broad Course of Study

The Dashboard will be used to identify school districts for assistance using the criteria adopted by the SBE. Last year the Dashboard identified 228 school districts as having at least one low-performing student group across two of the state priorities, flagging them for differentiated assistance. The approved changes by the SBE this year, along with the inclusion of the CCI, the Chronic Absenteeism Indicator and the now live local indicators, will likely change the number of districts identified as needing assistance when the fall 2018 Dashboard is officially released. In addition, county offices of education (COEs) are eligible for identification for the first time this year.

It is important to note that this was the last SBE meeting led by SBE President Michel Kirst, who announced his retirement in March, and it was also the last meeting for Superintendent of Public Instruction (SPI) Tom Torlakson, who terms out as SPI at the end of this year. Governor-elect Gavin Newsom will be responsible for appointing a new SBE President when he officially takes office.

“Tuck Concedes to Thurmond in Most Expensive SPI Race in U.S. History”

Over the weekend, former charter school executive Marshall Tuck formally conceded to Assembly Member Tony Thurmond (D-Richmond) in the race to become the state’s next Superintendent of Public Instruction (SPI).

Tuck found himself ahead on election night by more than 86,000 votes. However, once counties began to process the millions of vote-by-mail and provisional ballots following the election, Thurmond overtook Tuck and currently leads him by more than 150,000 votes. Even though there are still nearly 2 million unprocessed ballots, Tuck would need to take more than 54% of the remaining unprocessed ballots to overtake Thurmond’s substantial lead, a virtual impossibility for a race where the margin between the two candidates has never varied by more than a percent or two. Recognizing this, Tuck called Thurmond on Saturday to congratulate him on being elected the state’s next SPI.

California’s SPI race garnered national attention as nearly $60 million was spent on the contest through direct contributions and independent expenditure committees, making it the most expensive state superintendent contest in U.S. history.

Thurmond’s victory will make him the second African American to occupy the SPI post in California’s history. The last was Wilson Riles, who became SPI in 1971 and served for three terms before being defeated by Bill Honig in 1982.

Thurmond will officially take his new post beginning in January.

“CalSTRS Reports Minimal Improvements to Funding Levels”

For its November 2018 Board meeting, California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) released the 2018 CalSTRS Funding Levels and Risks report. The report shows funding levels are expected to improve minimally over the next decade while contribution rates for both employers and the state continue to increase based on the schedule in the funding plan. This report previews the information required to be provided to the Legislature as mandated by the CalSTRS full funding plan, which was enacted in law by Assembly Bill (AB) 1469 (Chapter 47/2014).

Increased CalSTRS funding levels are the result of more CalSTRS members who create a higher payroll upon which CalSTRS collects employer contributions and better-than-expected investment returns in 2017-18. An illustration of the projected funded status was provided by CalSTRS, which assumes a 7% rate of return.

 

While the assumed rate of return has been above 7% in the recent past, there are still risks in reaching full funding due to investment volatility. If California entered a recession that resulted in both a period of lower investment returns and the need for layoffs of CalSTRS members (teachers, faculty, and/or certificated/academic administrators), a significant strain would be put on CalSTRS’ ability to achieve full funding.

According to CalSTRS Deputy System Actuary David Lamoureux, “It would take only one or two years of lower-than-expected returns in the near term to push the funded status below 60%, or even 50%.” Actuaries have told both CalSTRS and the California Public Employees Retirement System that a funded status below 50% makes recovery to 100% very difficult, triggering an increase in employer rates.

Aside from the employer rate set in statute through 2020-21 and pre-California Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act (PEPRA) member contribution rates, CalSTRS projected contribution rates will be affected by actual investment performance, demographic changes, and actuarial assumption changes. 

Year

State

Employer

Pre-PEPRA

Post-PEPRA

2019-20

7.8%

18.13%

10.25%

10.205%

2020-21

8.3%

19.10%

10.25%

10.205%

2021-22

8.8%

18.60%

10.25%

10.205%

2022-23

9.3%

18.10%

10.25%

10.205%

2023-24

9.8%

18.10%

10.25%

10.205%

2024-25 to 2045-46

9.9%

18.10%

10.25%

10.205%

Based on AB 1469, the CalSTRS Board has rate-sharing authority for the state and employer rates through 2045-46 in order to move the system to full funding by 2046; the post-PEPRA employee contribution rate is calculated to equal one-half of the pension system’s normal cost.

FCPS:

 

Congratulations to STEM!

 

Fenton STEM Academy’s renewal petition was approved on consent by the LAUSD Board of Education on Tuesday, November 27, 2018.  It is important to note that none of the Fenton schools have benchmarks attached to their renewals, which could have been troubling if the board member elected next May to fill the vacancy in Board District 5 is not supportive of charter schools. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item III. A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 6, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve Memorandum of Understanding with “The World is Just a Book Away” (“WIJABA”) and Fenton Avenue Charter School

 

BACKGROUND

 

Leticia Padilla Parra, the Director of Fenton Avenue Charter School, was contacted by a non-profit organization that has been working with schools to revitalize their libraries.  The group connects schools to charitable organizations interested in providing the financial means of establishing and maintaining a library in the school that will be of interest and value to the children of the community. 

 

ANALYSIS

 

The organization that works to connect schools to funders is “The World is Just a Book Away” (“WIJABA”).   The libraries supported by the group are centered on the development of core educational and life skills that create life-long and socially responsible citizens.

 

The Memorandum of Understanding specifically states how the organization will support Fenton Avenue Charter School and the responsibilities of the school in fulfilling this partnership.  [i.e., The formation of a Library Management Committee (“LMC”) which will play a central role in determining the renovation and ongoing maintenance of the library.  This committee will be a subcommittee of one of FACS’ four governing councils, as determined by the school, and will ensure that the library is indeed operated by the school.]

 

To ensure that the partnership is successful, the Board is asked to review the MOU for appropriateness and clarity.  The MOU has also been reviewed by Kimberly Rodriguez, an attorney at Young, Minney and Corr.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the MOU between “The World is Just a Book way” (“WIJABA”) and Fenton Avenue Charter School.

 

Attachment: Memorandum of Understanding with “The World is Just a Book Away” (“WIJABA”) and Fenton Avenue Charter School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 6, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to receive and file the June 30, 2018 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

BACKGROUND

 

Each year, an independent fiscal audit is required to review the financial practices and year-end position of local educational agencies.  Audits must be conducted in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the U.S. and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States.

 

ANALYSIS

 

An audit of the Fenton Charter Public Schools was conducted by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP (formerly Vicenti, Lloyd, & Stutzman, LLP).  A final consolidated audit report was received on November 30, 2018, and as per state requirements, will be filed with the State Controller’s Office, Los Angeles County Office of Education, and the authorizing district, LAUSD by December 15, 2018.  The final report is attached here for receipt by the Board.  There were no weaknesses present in internal controls, compliance and other matters, and no findings found.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors receive and file the June 30, 2018 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 6, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve LAUSD Certification of Board Compliance Review

 

BACKGROUND

 

As part of the responsibility set forth in Education Code § 47604.3, the authorizing district of the five Fenton schools, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), through the Charter Schools Division (CSD), monitors each school’s compliance with applicable legal and policy requirements.  

 

ANALYSIS

 

The oversight entails two actions on the part of the charter school’s Governing Board:

 

    1. a.Certification of Board Compliance Review:  As part of the Governing Board’s fulfillment of its fiduciary responsibility to ensure that the charter schools comply with all applicable laws and other requirements, the Governing Boards are asked to periodically review, discuss, monitor, and modify, if necessary, the schools’ policies, systems, and procedures for compliance with such requirements.  The chair of the Governing Board is to sign a certification at the end of the documents supplied by the District and to return the documents, along with relevant Board agendas and minutes that document the Board’s review of these compliance items, no later than January 11, 2019.   
    2. b.Documentation of Compliance:  The CSD will review documentation of compliance with several key legal requirements as part of this year’s annual performance-based oversight visit to each school.  Schools were asked to prepare documentation as requested by the CSD in four binders:  Binder 1, Binder 2, Binder 3 and Binder 3A.  Additionally, document requirements under the CSD’s purview have been simplified into quarterly deadlines (i.e. Qi, Q2, Q3, and Q4) to minimize the number of times schools are asked to send information to the division on an annual basis.  This reorganization has been designed to consolidate multiple document requests and reduce the amount of time school leaders spend on oversight visit preparation, since many of the items have been removed from the oversight visit binder checklist.  The quarterly submission calendar has been organized so that the bulk of the documents coincide with schools’ beginning of the year compliance reviews.  

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors review the materials prepared for the LAUSD Charter School Division’s oversight visits, and if the materials are in order and satisfactory, approve the “Certification of Board Compliance Review” documents for each school.  

 

Oversight visits have been scheduled as follows and all Board members are welcome at each site to participate in the oversight process:

 

Fenton Primary Center: January 17, 2019

Fenton Avenue Charter School:  January 24, 2019

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy:  February 7, 2019

Fenton STEM Academy:  February 13, 2019

Santa Monica Blvd. Community Charter School:  February 20, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.C.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 6, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve updated FCPS “Boundaries Policy”

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools have included a comprehensive Boundaries Policy within its Employee Handbook since January 2017.  With the increased concern regarding student safety, the policy has been further defined and was sent to all Board members and staff.

 

ANALYSIS

 

For the purposes of this policy, the term “Boundaries” is defined as acceptable professional behavior by employees while interacting with a student.  Trespassing beyond the Boundaries of a student/teacher or student/educator relationship is deemed an abuse of power and a betrayal of public trust.

On pages 9 and 10 of the current Employee Handbook, Unacceptable and Acceptable Behavior is clearly defined.  To ensure there are no misunderstandings as to appropriate behavior, the list has been further clarified with an updated, and separate Boundaries Policy sent to all staff for immediate implementation.

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board approve the updated and separate Boundaries Policy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment:  FCPS Boundaries Policy

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Boundaries Policy

 

DISCIPLINARY PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH STUDENTS 

It is the policy of the Fenton Charter Public Schools that no teacher or other staff member will use corporal punishment against a student. This prohibition includes spanking, slapping, pinching, hitting, tying, taping, or the use of any other physical force as retaliation or correction for inappropriate behavior. 

STAFF-STUDENT INTERACTIONS

While the use of appropriate touching is part of daily life and is important for student development, teachers and other staff members must ensure that they do not exceed appropriate behavior. If a child or other staff member specifically requests that he or she not be touched, then that request must be honored without question. 

Boundaries Defined

For the purposes of this policy the term “boundaries” is defined as acceptable professional behavior by staff members while interacting with a student. Trespassing beyond the boundaries of a student-teacher relationship is deemed an abuse of power and a betrayal of public trust. 

 

Acceptable and Unacceptable Behaviors

Some activities may seem innocent from a staff member’s perspective but may be perceived as flirtation or sexual insinuation from a student or parental point of view. The purpose of the following lists of unacceptable and acceptable behaviors is not to restrain innocent, positive relationships between staff and students, but to prevent relationships that could lead to or may be perceived as inappropriate, or sexual misconduct, or “grooming.” Grooming is defined as an act or series of acts by a sexual predator to gain physical and/or emotional control by gaining trust (of staff and/or family and a minor) and desensitizing the minor to various forms of touching and other intimate interaction.  

Staff members must understand their own responsibilities for ensuring that they do not cross the boundaries as written in this policy. Violations could subject the teacher or staff member to discipline up to and including termination. Disagreeing with the wording or intent of these established boundaries will be considered irrelevant for any required disciplinary purposes. Thus, it is critical that all employees study this policy thoroughly and apply its spirit and intent in their daily activities.

Unacceptable Behaviors

These lists (and any subsequent lists) are not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather, illustrative of the types of behavior we intend to address by this policy. 

 

• Giving gifts to an individual student that are of a personal and intimate nature (including photographs); or items such as money, food, outings, electronics, etc. without the written pre-approval of the Director (or administrative designee). It is recommended that any such gifts be filtered through the Director of the school (or administrative designee) along with the rationale.

 

• Kissing of ANY kind

 

• Massage [Note: Prohibited in athletics unless provided by massage therapist or other certified professional in an open public location. Coaches may not perform massage or rub-down. Permitted in special education only as instructed under an IEP or 504 plan.]

 

• Full frontal or rear hugs and lengthy embraces

 

    • ¥Sitting students on one’s lap (grades 3 and above)

• Touching buttocks, thighs, chest or genital area

    • ¥Wrestling with students or other staff member except in the context of a formal wrestling program
    • ¥Tickling or piggyback rides
    • ¥Any form of sexual contact
    • ¥Any type of unnecessary physical contact with a student in a private situation

• Intentionally being alone with a student away from school 

    • ¥Furnishing alcohol, tobacco products, or drugs or failing to report knowledge of such

• “Dating” or “going out with” a student

 

• Remarks about physical attributes or physiological development of anyone. This includes comments such as “Looking fine!” or “Check out that [body part].”

 

• Taking photographs or videos of students for personal use or posting online

 

    • ¥Undressing in front of a student

• Leaving campus alone with a student for lunch 

 

• Sharing a bed, mat, or sleeping bag with a student

 

• Making, or participating in, sexually inappropriate comments

 

• Sexual jokes, or jokes/comments with sexual overtones or double-entendres

 

• Seeking emotional involvement (which can include intimate attachment) with a student beyond the normative care and concern required of an educator.

 

• Listening to or telling stories that are sexually oriented

 

• Discussing your personal troubles or intimate issues with a student 

 

• Becoming involved with a student so that a reasonable person may suspect inappropriate behavior

• Giving students a ride to/from school or school activities without the express, advance written permission of the Director of the school (or administrative designee) and the student’s parent or legal guardian

 

• Being alone in a room with a student at school with the door closed and/or windows blocked from view

 

• Allowing students at your home and/or in rooms within your home without signed parental permission for a pre-planned and pre-communicated educational activity which must include another educator, parent, or designated school volunteer

 

• Leaving campus alone with a student for lunch 

 

• Staff mirroring the immature behavior of minors

 

• Sending emails, text messages, social media responses, making phone calls, or sending notes or letters to students if the content is not about school activities. Communication via private social media accounts is not acceptable. 

Acceptable Behaviors

• Pats on the shoulder or back

    • ¥Handshakes
    • ¥“High-fives” and hand slapping
    • ¥Touching face to check temperature, wipe away a tear, remove hair from face, or other similar types of contact
    • ¥Placing TK through second grade students on one’s lap for purposes of comforting the child for a short duration only
    • ¥Holding hands while walking with small children or children with significant disabilities
    • ¥Assisting with toileting of small or disabled children in view of another staff member
    • ¥Touch required under an IEP or 504 Plan
    • ¥Reasonable restraint of a violent person to protect self, others, or property
    • ¥Obtaining formal written pre-approval from the Director of the school (or administrative designee) to take students off school property for activities such as field trips or competitions, including parent’s written permission and waiver form for any sponsored after-school activity whether on or off campus 

• Emails, text-messages, phone conversations, and other communications to and with students, if permitted, must be professional and pertain to school activities or classes (communication should be initiated via transparent [non-private] school-based technology and equipment)

• Keeping the door wide open when alone with a student

• Keeping reasonable and appropriate space between you and the student

• Stopping and correcting students if they cross your own personal boundaries, including touching legs, or buttocks, frontal hugs, kissing, or caressing

• Keeping parents informed when a significant issue develops about a student, such as a change in demeanor or uncharacteristic behavior

• Keeping after-class discussions with a student professional and brief

• Immediately asking for advice from senior staff or administration if you find yourself in a difficult situation related to boundaries

• Involving your direct supervisor in discussion about boundaries situations that have the potential to become more severe (including but not limited to: grooming or other red flag behaviors observed in colleagues, written material that is disturbing, or a student’s fixation on an adult)

• Making detailed notes about an incident that in your best judgment could evolve into a more serious situation later 

• Recognizing the responsibility to stop Unacceptable Behaviors of students and/or co-workers  

• Asking another staff member to be present, or within close supervisory distance, when you must be alone with a student after regular school hours 

• Prioritizing professional behavior during all moments of student contact 

Asking yourself if any of your actions, which are contrary to these provisions, are worth sacrificing your job and career.

This policy does not prevent: 1) touching a student for the purpose of guiding them along a physical path; 2) helping them up after a fall; or 3) engaging in a rescue or the application of Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) or other emergency first-aid. Nor does it prohibit the use of reasonable force and touching in self-defense or in the defense of another. Restraining a child who is trying to engage in violent or inappropriate behavior is also allowed. Only such force as necessary to defend one’s self, another person, or the child or to protect property is legally permitted. Excessive force is prohibited. 

Boundaries Reporting

When any staff member, parent, or student becomes aware of a staff member (or volunteer, guest, vendor) having crossed the boundaries specified in this policy, or has a strong suspicion of misconduct, he or she must report the suspicion to the Director of the school (or administrative designee) promptly. Reasonable suspicion means something perceived in spite of inconclusive or slight evidence. It is based on facts that would lead a reasonable person to believe the conduct occurred.  Prompt reporting is essential to protect students, the suspected staff member, any witnesses, and the school as a whole. Employees must also report to the administration any awareness of, or concern about, student behavior that crosses boundaries, or any situation in which a student appears to be at risk for sexual abuse. 

 

Child Abuse / Sexual Abuse Reporting (Mandatory Reporting)

If, within your professional capacity or within the scope of your employment, you observe or gain possession of knowledge that a child has been a victim of child abuse or sexual abuse, or you reasonably suspect it, California Penal Code Section 11166 requires you to immediately report this information or suspicion directly to a child protective agency or the police. The report shall be made by phone as soon as possible and a subsequent written report must be sent within 36 hours of your knowledge or suspicion of the abuse. Internal reporting to the Director of the school (or administrative designee) occurs after the phone-in report. Failure to meet these obligations can result in a monetary fine and/or jail. 

Investigating

The Director of the school (or administrative designee) will promptly investigate and document the investigation of any allegation of sexual misconduct or inappropriate behavior, using such support staff or outside assistance, as he or she deems necessary and appropriate under the circumstances. Throughout this fact-finding process, the investigating administrator, and all others privy to the investigation, shall protect the privacy interests of any affected student(s) and/or staff member(s) including any potential witnesses, as much as possible. The investigating administrator shall promptly notify the Governing Board in closed session of the existence and status of any investigations. Upon completion of any such investigations, the investigating administrator shall report to the Governing Board any conclusions reached. The investigating administrator shall consult with legal counsel, as appropriate, prior to, during, and after conducting any investigation. 

Consequences

Staff members who have violated this policy will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, and where appropriate, will be reported to authorities for potential legal action. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.D.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 6, 2018

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve revision of Procurement and Purchasing Procedures 

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools has an established procurement and purchasing policy, which ensures the ability of the Fenton schools to purchase materials and supplies, and enter into contracts while generally carrying on the business of the schools in a manner that deals equitably with all vendors and provides for efficient management and proper expenditure of public funds. 

 

ANALYSIS

 

As necessary, minor additions and changes are made to the policy to ensure that the policy continues to be consistent with current applicable state and federal law, while also specifically articulating expectations of all staff involved in purchasing resources for the schools.

 

The last revision of the policy was recommended and approved on October 19, 2017 and necessitated by new requirements received from the California Department of Education, School Nutrition Division.  

 

The revisions recommended here are as follows: 

 

    • ïImplementation of required training for employees (page 5);
    • ïClarification to the bid process (page 7);
    • ïAddition of the “Buying American” provision (pages 7 – 9); and 
    • ïDifferentiation for “micro-purchases” (pages 9 -10)

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the revised Procurement and Purchasing Procedures Policy.

 

 

Attachment: Revised Procurement and Purchasing Procedures 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Procurement and Purchasing Procedures

 

 

 

 

Revised and Adopted:  December 6, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Procurement and Purchasing Procedures

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

    1. a.Purpose……………………………………………………………………………………3

 

    1. a.Scope……………………………………………………………………….……………..3

 

    1. a.Program Security………………………………………………………………….………3

 

    1. a.Bidding Requirements and Purchase Limits………………………………………….…..6

 

    1. a.Emergency Purchases………………………………………………………………….….9

 

    1. a.Required Approvals……………………………………………………………………….9

 

    1. a.Receiving Procedures……………………………………………………………..….….10

 

    1. a.Order Status………………………………………………………………………….......10