Board Agenda

Fenton Charter Public Schools

REGULAR MEETING - BOARD OF DIRECTORS

AGENDA
FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes.

 

FCPS: 8928 B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 962-3630

FACS: 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342 • (818) 896-7482

SMBCCS: 1022 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038 • (323) 469-0971

FPC: 11351 DronfieldAvenue, Pacoima, CA 91331 • (818) 485-5900

STEM and FCLA: 8926 Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352 • (818) 962-3636

December 5, 2019 – 4:30 P.M.

Fenton Charter Public Schools Office

8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352

Call-in Number: (712) 770-5581; Access Code: 881498#

AGENDA

 

Instructions for Presentations to the Board by Parents and Citizens

 

The Fenton Charter Public Schools (“Charter Schools”) welcome your participation at the Charter Schools’ Board meetings.  The purpose of a public meeting of the Board of Directors (“Board”) is to conduct the affairs of the Charter Schools in public.  Your participation assures us of continuing community interest in our Charter Schools.  To assist you in the case of speaking/participating in our meetings, the following guidelines are provided:

 

1. Agendas are available to all audience members at the door to the meeting.

 

2. “Request to Speak” forms are available to all audience members who wish to speak on any agenda items or under the general category of “Presentations from the Public.”  “Presentations from the Public” is set aside for members of the audience to raise issues that are not specifically on the agenda.  However, due to public meeting laws, the Board can only listen to your issue, not respond or take action.  These presentations are limited to three (3) minutes and total time allotted to non-agenda items will not exceed fifteen (15) minutes.  The Board may give direction to staff to respond to your concern or you may be offered the option of returning with a citizen-requested item.

 

3. You may also complete a “Request to Speak” form to address the Board on Agenda items.  With regard to such agenda items, you may specify that agenda item on your “Request to Speak” form and you will be given an opportunity to speak for up to five (5) minutes when the Board discusses that item.  The total time allocated to agenda items will not exceed thirty (30) minutes per item.  

 

4. When addressing the Board, speakers are requested to state their name and address from the podium and adhere to the time limits set forth.

 

5. Any public records relating to an agenda item for an open session of the Board which are distributed to all, or a majority of all, of the Board members shall be available for public inspection at 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, California.

 

I. PRELIMINARY

 

A. Call to Order – Chairperson of the Board – Joe Lucente

 

B. Roll Call – Secretaries of the Board – Beth Henschel, Marie Kirakossian and Megan Stevenson

 

C. Flag Salute – Chair Lucente

 

D. Approval of the Agenda – Chair Lucente

 

The Chair will request any amendments to the agenda, and then approval.

 

E. Minutes of Previous Regular Meeting - Chair Lucente

 

Minutes of the October 24, 2019 Regular Meeting of the Board of Directors will be presented for approval. 

 

II. COMMUNICATIONS

 

A. Presentations from the Public – Chair Lucente

 

Any persons present desiring to address the Board of Directors on any proper matter.

 

Agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than five (5) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed thirty (30) minutes per agenda item.  

 

Non-agenda items:  No individual presentation shall be for more than three (3) minutes and the total time for this purpose shall not exceed fifteen (15) minutes.  

 

Ordinarily, Board members will not respond to presentations and no action can be taken.  However, the Board may give direction to staff following a presentation.

 

B. Committee/Council Reports

 

1. Finance Committee: Sarah Ananta, Maria Patrón (FPC); Donald Ausherman, AJ Smith (SMBCCS); Jennifer Hines (FCLA); Dominica Yasuda (STEM)

Budget, Facilities and Safety Council:  Tony Peña, Marty Penner  (FACS)

 

2. Instruction Committee: Lisa Ibarra, Mara Shinn Smith (FPC); Gaby Arroyo, Jennifer Nishimoto (SMBCCS); Yesenia Fuentes (FCLA); Alejandra Muñoz (STEM)

Curriculum and Assessment Council: Lee Melo, Christopher Torres (FACS)

 

3. Personnel Committee: Nina Ferman, Coco Salazar (FPC); Megan Stevenson, Tiene Hauck (SMBCCS); Kate Hetu (FCLA); Elisa Vallejo (STEM)

Human Resource and Personnel Council: Leanna Hendrix, Mercedes Meeks (FACS)

 

4. Parent/Community Advocacy Committee: Bridget Ruiz, Coco Salazar (FPC); Ariana Gomez, Evelia Manzo (SMBCCS); Lindsay Oquindo (FCLA);
Sydney Crowe (STEM)

School-Community Relations Council:  (FACS)

 

a. School Site Council:  Leticia Padilla Parra, Christopher Torres (FACS); Richard Parra, Sandra Valle (FPC); Karla Morales Jimenez, Bunny Wolfer (SMBCCS); Amarjeet Gonzalez (FCLA/STEM) 

 

b. English Learner Advisory Committee

 

C. Financial Business Manager’s Report: Cindy Frantz, Assistant to Kristin Dietz, Vice President, EdTec - FCPS Financial Business Manager

 

The Assistant to the Financial Business Manager will present the First Interim Reports, October financial statements, cash flow position, and any variations in revenues and expenditures from the approved 2019-2020 budgets for all sites.

 

D. Directors’ Reports 

 

1. Fenton Avenue Charter School (FACS) – Mrs. Leticia Padilla Parra

 

2. Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School (SMBCCS) – Mr. Cary Rabinowitz

 

3. Fenton Primary Center (FPC) – Mr. Richard Parra

 

4. Fenton STEM Academy (STEM) – Mrs. Jennifer Miller

 

5. Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (FCLA) – Mrs. Jennifer Miller

 

E. Chief Academic Officer’s Report and LCAP Update – Dr. David Riddick

 

F. Executive Director’s Report:  Dr. David Riddick

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items. 

 

There are no consent agenda items. 

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

A. Recommendation to review and receive the draft of the June 30, 2019 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

B. Recommendation to approve LAUSD Certification of Board Compliance Review

C. Recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director

 

D. Recommendation to ratify and accept Memorandum of Understanding and Grant Agreement with Think Together

 

E. Recommendation to ratify and accept contracts with Grant Republic for grant writing services, including California State Preschool Program Grant for Fenton schools consortium 

 

F. Recommendation to ratify and accept contract with Schwab Actuarial Services to produce 10-year projection of OPEB costs

 

G. Recommendation to ratify and accept various ongoing contracts with school vendors 

 

H. Recommendation to approve expansion plan for Fenton Charter Leadership Academy and Fenton STEM Academy

 

I. Recommendation to approve Resolution #38:  Issuance of Education Revenue Bonds to Refinance New Market Tax Credit Loan for SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC; and   Refinance Clearinghouse Loan and Finance Expansion Efforts for SFV 8926 Sunland LLC

 

V. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION 

 

  1. A.Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

B. Recognition of FCPS Student Achievement Symposium Presenters

 

VI. ANNOUNCEMENTS

IX. ADJOURNMENT 

 

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools will be held on Thursday, January 30, 2020 at 4:30 p.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools, 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

 

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance, disability-related modifications or accommodations, including auxiliary aids or services, in order to participate in the public meeting of the FCPS Board of Directors, please contact the main office of either Fenton Avenue Charter School or the Fenton Primary Center at (818) 896-7482.  Notification of 72 hours prior to the meeting will enable FCPS to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accommodations and accessibility to this meeting.  Upon request, FCPS shall also make available this agenda and all other public records associated with this meeting in appropriate alternative formats for persons with disabilities.

Item I.E.

UNAPPROVED MINUTES

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

 

October 24, 2019

 

A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools was held on Thursday, October 24, 2019, at 4:30 p.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools, 8928B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA 91352. [Call-in number: (712) 770-5581; access code:  881498#]

 

I. PRELIMINARY

 

A. Call to Order – President of the Board – Irene Sumida

 

The Board of Directors meeting was called to order at 4:40 p.m. by President Sumida.

 

B. Roll Call – Secretaries of the Board – Nitima Angus and Coco Salazar

 

Board Members Present

Yvette King-Berg, Community Representative

Daniel Laughlin, Parent Representative

Joe Lucente, Community Representative (via conference call:  17112 Minnehaha Street, Granada Hills, CA  91344)

Walter Wallace, Community Representative 

 

Board Members Not Present

Diane Abeyta, Parent Representative

Jed Wallace, Community Representative

 

C. Flag Salute – President Sumida

 

President Sumida led the Board and the public in the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

D. Approval of the Agenda – President Sumida

 

On MOTION of Joe Lucente, SECONDED by Daniel Laughlin and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the Agenda (Item I.D.) was approved as presented.

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

E. Approval of Minutes of Previous Meetings – President Sumida

 

1. Minutes of Previous Regular Meeting 

 

On MOTION of Daniel Laughlin, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the minutes of the September 12, 2019 Regular Meeting (Item I.E1.) were approved as presented. 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

2. Minutes of Special Meeting 

 

On MOTION of Daniel Laughlin, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the minutes of the October 2, 2019 Special Meeting (Item I.E.2.) were approved as presented. 

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

II. COMMUNICATIONS

 

A. Presentations from the Public – President Sumida

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

B. Committee/Council Reports 

 

Minutes of all meetings held by any committee and/or council were sent to the Board Members prior to this meeting.  

 

There were no further reports by committees/councils.  

 

C. Financial Business Manager’s Report 

 

Kristin Dietz, Vice President of EdTec, and Financial Business Manager of FCPS, presented the following update:

  • •Consolidated forecasted net income is now $413,327, a decrease from the original approved budget of -$265K due to the following:
    • oADA reduced by -128.57 on a consolidated basis to more closely align with actual enrollment at each school ($1.43M consolidated decrease in expense)
    • oFTE (Full-Time Equivalent) counts and salaries were discussed at length with the administrators and corrected for accuracy ($1.25M consolidated decrease in expense)
    • oIncrease in contracted Special Education services ($188K consolidated increase in expense)  
    • oIncrease in substitute costs due to employee personal leaves ($176K consolidated increase in expense)
    • oCash balances and overall fiscal health remain very strong, and all sites continue to have positive cash balances:
    • oFACS:  208 days cash on hand (6.9 months)
    • oFPC:  131 days cash on hand (4.4 months)
    • oSMBCCS:  170 days cash on hand (5.7 months)
    • oSTEM:  22 days cash on hand (0.7 months)
    • oFCLA:  22 days cash on hand (0.7 months)
    • oFCPS:  179 days cash on hand (6.0 months)

 

D. Directors’ Reports 

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School (FACS) – Leticia Padilla Parra, Director, reported.

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School (SMBCCS) – Cary Rabinowitz, Director, reported.

 

Fenton Primary Center (FPC) – Richard Parra, Director, reported.

 

Fenton STEM Academy (STEM) – Jennifer Miller, Director, reported.

 

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (FCLA) – Jennifer Miller, Director, reported.

 

E. Chief Academic Officer’s Report 

 

Fenton Charter Pubic Schools (FCPS) – Dr. David Riddick, Chief Academic Officer, reported.

 

F. Executive Director’s Report 

 

Fenton Charter Public Schools (FCPS) – Irene Sumida, Executive Director reported.

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS 

 

    1. a.Recommendation to approve the Fenton Charter Public Schools Master Plan for English Learners

 

    1. a.Recommendation to approve Local Indicators for the California School Dashboard for FACS, SMBCCS, FPC, STEM and FCLA

On MOTION of Yvette King-Berg, SECONDED by Daniel Laughlin and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the Consent Agenda (Items III.A. and III.B.) was approved as presented.

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION

 

A. Recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director

 

On MOTION of Daniel Laughlin, SECONDED by Walter Wallace and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director (Item IV.B.) was approved.

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

B. Recommendation to approve policy for calculating CMO management fees charged to school sites 

 

On MOTION of Yvette King-Berg, SECONDED by Daniel Laughlin and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the policy for calculating CMO management fees charged to school sites (Item IV.C.) was approved.

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

C. Recommendation to approve revised Procurement and Purchasing Procedures

 

On MOTION of Walter Wallace, SECONDED by Daniel Laughlin and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve the revised Procurement and Purchasing Procedures (Item IV.D.) was approved.

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

D. Recommendation to approve selected investment bankers to manage process of bond financing for SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC

 

On MOTION of Daniel Laughlin, SECONDED by Yvette King-Berg and CARRIED by a vote of 4 (YES) and 0 (NO), the recommendation to approve RBC Capital Markets to manage process of bond financing for SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC (Item IV.E.) was approved.  The Board further authorized the Executive Director to sign the letter of engagement between the Fenton Charter Public Schools and RBC Capital Markets.

 

Aye: (4) Yvette King-Berg, Daniel Laughlin, Joe Lucente,

Walter Wallace

Nay: (0)

Abstentions: (0)

 

V. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION

 

    1. a.Brown Act Training - Janelle Ruley (Young, Minney and Corr LLP) 

 

    1. a.LAUSD Charter Schools Division Oversight Process

C. Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

D. E-Rate Executive Summary

 

These were information items only and no action was taken.

 

VI. ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fenton Charter Public Schools will be held on Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. in the boardroom of the Fenton Charter Public Schools, 8928 B Sunland Boulevard, Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

VII. ADJOURNMENT 

 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:13 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Respectfully submitted:

 

 

 

______________________________ ___________________________

Nitima Angus Coco Salazar

Secretary of the BoardSecretary of the Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. B. 

 

Committee and Council Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.1.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Unapproved Minutes of the Budget, Facilities, and Safety Council

 

November 5, 2019

 

A meeting of the Budget, Facilities, and Safety Council was held on Tuesday, November 5th, 2019 at 7:15 a.m. in the Conference Room of Fenton Avenue Charter School at 11828 Gain Street, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342.

 

Call to Order: Martin Penner, Co-Chair

 

The Budget, Facilities, and Safety Council was called to order at 7:15 a.m. by Co-Chair, Martin Penner.

 

Roll Call: Mary Ann McPherson, Secretary

 

Members Present         Members Absent           Others Present 

 

See attached sign-in sheet for members present, members absent, members excused and others present.

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Martin Penner, Co-Chair

 

Items #3 and #4 were moved to New Business.

 

Item #1 Minutes from the October 1, 2019 meeting of the Budget, Facilities, and Safety Council (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Vanessa Ettleman, SECONDED by Patricia Aparicio, and CARRIED, the minutes of the Budget, Facilities, and Safety Council of October 1, 2019 were approved as submitted. 

 

Presentations from the Public: Martin Penner, Co-Chair

 

 

Item #2                       There were no presentations from the public.   

 

Old Business: There was no old business.

 

New Business: 

 

Item #3 Budget Update (LCAP 2, AMO 2), Leticia Padilla Parra, Director 

 (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only.  Mrs. Padilla Parra shared with the council that the budget is in the process of being reworked due to the shift in the number of 3rd grade classes and that the new budget will be shared with the council when it is received.

 

Item #4 Facilities Update (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 5), Leticia Padilla Parra, Director

(Informational Item)

This was an informational item only.  Mrs. Padilla Parra shared the facilities updates to the FACS campus, which include the installation of the new intercom clock and bell system in all classrooms as well as the installation of security cameras throughout the campus and in the parking lot.  She explained that when this work is completed possibilities for revamping the Firefly Garden (former Bear Garden) would be addressed.

 

Item #5 FACS Accounting Procedures (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 2)Leticia Padilla Parra, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Mrs. Padilla Parra reviewed the memo to staff from Executive Director Sumida outlining FACS accounting procedures to be followed particularly for staff attending conferences and requesting reimbursements. She stressed the importance of providing accurate documentation for conference attendance, lodging, and mileage. 

 

Announcements: There were no announcements. 

 

Next Regular Meeting: To Be Determined

 

Adjournment: 

 

By order of GENERAL CONSENSUS, the Budget, Facilities and Safety Council adjourned at 7:37 a.m. The next regular meeting of the council is to be determined.

 

Respectfully Submitted by Mary Ann McPherson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.2.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

 

 Instruction Committee

October 16, 2019

7:15 a.m. – Auditorium  

 

MINUTES

Call to Order: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

A meeting of the Instruction Committee was held on Wednesday, October 16, 2019, at 7:16 A.M. in the auditorium at Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School at 1022 N. Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, California, 90038.

 

Roll Call: Carmen Solis, Co-Secretary

Present: Cary Rabinowitz, Caroline Engel, Lisa Morales, Jennifer Flynn, Carmen Solis, Kim Kiser, Angela Boyd, Jocelyn O’Brien, Cassondra Barrett, Kyra Requiestas, Grisel Benn, Jazmin Luna, Fabiola Vega, Gaby Arroyo, Jennifer Nishimoto, Robin Rodriguez

 

Excused Members: None

Absent: Sasha Góngora

Non-Committee Members Present: Monica Castañeda and Bunny Wolfer

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda:  Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

Approval of Minutes: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

 

Item #1 Minutes from the August 28, 2019 meeting of the Instruction Committee (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Lisa Morales SECONDED by Jocelyn O’Brien and CARRIED, the minutes of the Instruction Committee from August 28, 2019 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Instruction Committee on any

proper matter.

 

Old Business:   None

 

New Business: 

 

Item #3 2018-2019 Released CAASPP Summative Assessment Results (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 1-2), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item) 

 

Mr. Rabinowitz shared the 2018-2019 Released CAASPP Summative Assessment Results. The Committee analyzed and compared the data to other schools in the area. SMBCCS showed growth in Mathematics overall.  SMBCCS showed a 5% decrease in ELA performance although we are still above the resident school median.

 

Item #4 SMBCCS Performance Indicator Review Plan (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 2), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

 Mr. Rabinowitz shared the SMBCCS Performance Indicator Review Plan with the Committee. The Performance Indicator Review Plan focused on the achievement of special education students in Mathematics and ELA.  The purpose is to support the needs of the SPED students by creating an action plan for the school.  The plan includes continued PD for teachers, enhanced collaboration between general education teachers and special education teachers, and tiered intervention support for all students.

 

Item #5 Fall 2020 NWEA MAP BOY Student Outcomes, (LCAP 1, AMO 1), Robin Rodriguez, Administrative Coordinator (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Rodriguez thanked the staff for ensuring that all students were tested during the MAP testing block. The MAP Student Outcome graph was displayed to and shows growth in the amount of students reaching the 41st percentile or above in Mathematics, Reading, and Language.  Information was reviewed.  Student Achievement and Growth Documents have been reviewed at previous Staff Meetings. Mrs. Rodriguez appreciates that teachers are using the MAP documents to assist students in their learning. 

 

Item #6 CA School Dashboard Local Indicators, (LCAP 2, AMO 1-4, LCAP 3, AMO 1-6) Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Rabinowitz reviewed the CA School Dashboard Local Indicators document. The document focuses on five priorities 1) Appropriately assigned teachers, access to curriculum, and safe and clean facilities, 2) Implementation of State standards 3) Parent engagement 6) School climate 7) Access to a broad course of study.  The document will be submitted to the State at the beginning of November.

 

Item #7 LAUSD CSD Annual Performance Based Oversight Visit (LCAP Goals 1-3), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Rabinowitz informed the Committee that the LAUSD CSD Annual Performance Based Oversight Visit this year will be on February 6th 2020.  The areas of focus this year will be implementation of Kagan Strategies, Small Group Instruction and Technology in the classroom. 

 

Item #8 Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Self-Study Visit, (LCAP Goals 1-3), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This item was tabled for discussion at our Wednesday, October 23rd meeting.

 

Item #9 Computer-Based ELPAC Summative Assessment Field-Test (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 3), Monica

Castañeda, Assistant Director (Informational Item)

 

Ms. Castañeda shared that ELPAC Computer-Based Assessments will begin October 17tht. One hundred students will be tested. There will be 20 students from K-2nd grade, 7 students from 3rd, 8 from 4th grade, 5 students from 5th and 20 students from 6th grade. All students must be tested by the November 1st deadline. The Field-Test will give Administration an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the test. By Spring, others will be trained to administer the ELPAC Test including ELD Leads. 

 

Item #10 Revised Coordination of Services Team (COST) Form  (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 1-3), Monica Castańeda, Assistant Director (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Carloine Engel SECONDED by Kim Kiser and CARRIED, the Revised Coordination of Services Team (COST) Form was approved.

The revised COST form was presented to the Committee. The COST form was presented earlier in the month during a Lead Teacher meeting and SPED meeting and feedback was gathered from the SMBCCS teachers.  The purpose of the updated COST Form is to create a more substantial streamline document for all that specifies strategies and supports that have been implemented in the classroom.  This would provide additional comprehensive information for SST’s as well as support the SPED Team when potentially assessing a student for special education services. The Committee discussed each component of the document. The COST form will be used for TK-6th grades. The Committee discussed some revisions to the document which include adding a section for grade levels and specifying math facts skills pertaining to certain grade levels.

 

Item #11 Jefferson Elementary School - Apple School Tours (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 5), Cary Rabinowitz,

Director (Informational Item)

 

This item was tabled for discussion at our Wednesday, October 23rd meeting.

 

Item #12 Spring 2020 CUE Conference Approval (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 5), Cary Rabinowitz, Director

(Motion to Approve)

 

This item was tabled for discussion at our Wednesday, October 23rd meeting.

 

Item #13 CA STEAM Symposium Approval (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 5), Cary Rabinowitz, Director

(Motion to Approve)

 

This item was tabled for discussion at our Wednesday, October 23rd meeting.

 

Item #14 Reading is Fundamental (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 2, LCAP Goal 2, AMO 1), Gaby Arroyo, Instruction Co-Chair (Informational Item)

 

This item was tabled for discussion at our Wednesday, October 23rd meeting.

 

Announcements: Agenda items 8 and 11-14 were tabled due to time and will be agendized for our meeting on Wednesday, October 23rd, 2019.

 

Next Regular Meeting: Wednesday, October 23, 2019

 

Adjournment:

 

On MOTION of Lisa Morales SECONDED by Kimberly Kiser and CARRIED, the Instruction Committee adjourned at 7:56 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Carmen Solis Co-Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Primary Center

 

Unapproved Minutes of the

Instruction Committee

 

October 23, 2019

 

A meeting of the Instruction Committee was held on Wednesday, October 23, 2019 at 7:15 AM in the conference room of the Fenton Primary Center at 11351 Dronfield Avenue, Pacoima, CA, 91331.

Call to Order:  Lisa Ibarra and Mara Shinn Smith, Council Co-Chairs  

 

Roll Call:    Karen Knapp, Secretary

 

Members Present: Mara Shinn Smith, Karen Knapp, Coco Salazar, Krystal Rodriguez, Richard Parra, Jacqueline Penner, Maria Reyes, Lisa Ibarra, Angie Salceda, Nitima Angus, Abigail Lopez-Dee, Wendy Kaufman, Vanessa Sarnecki, Sirui Thomassian, Gurpreet Gill, Brianna Ellis, Maria Cardenas

 

Members Excused: Paola Ramirez, Diana Lucas

 

Members Absent: none

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda:  Lisa Ibarra and Mara Shinn Smith, Council Co-Chairs

 

Item #1       Minutes from the October 15, 2019 meeting of the Instruction Committee (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Nitima Angus, SECONDED by Angie Salceda, and CARRIED, the Minutes of the Instruction Committee Meeting of October 15, 2019 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Lisa Ibarra and Mara Shinn Smith, Council Co-Chairs

 

Item #2       Any person(s) desiring to address the Instruction Committee on any proper matter.

 

Old Business: None

 

New Business:

                        

Item #3   Multi-Tier Systems of Support (MTSS) (LCAP 1, AMO 1, LCAP 3, AMO3), Mara Shinn Smith, Reading Intervention Specialist (Informational Item)

 

Mara Shinn Smith presented the committee with the MTSS schedule which will begin Monday, November 4, 2019.  Students are grouped by ability and skill.  In addition to the grade level teachers, Lisa Ibarra, Mara Shinn Smith, the Educational Specialists, T.A.s, and student volunteers will work with groups during MTSS times.  Lisa Ibarra will service students with enrichment projects and activities for those students that are performing at grade level or above for 2nd grade and will help 1st graders struggling with writing. Mara Shinn Smith will work with those students who are in need of the most academic support. Maria Cardenas and Sandra Lee will continue servicing their students during MTSS group times. First and second grades will meet by hall color twice a week for 30 minutes. 

 

Item #4   Coordination of Services Team (COST) Meetings Time Frame (LCAP 3, AMO 3), Richard Parra, FPC Director (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Parra stated that the COST meetings will go on through November 8th, 2019. COST meetings are held among grade level meetings. Each teacher should attach the iStation report, ESGI report, and the NWEA Family Report to the COST form. 

 

Item #5      Library Literacy Event (LCAP 2, AMO 1, 2) Mara Shinn Smith, Reading Intervention Specialist (Informational Item)

 

FPC’s first Library Literacy joint event with the Lake View Terrace Library was well received with close to 70 people in attendance. The children’s librarian and library staff provided an orientation for students and families on all the available resources the library has to offer.  There was also a special guest, Summer, a reading therapy dog who volunteers at the library during the week.  Summer and her owner were also invited to FPC’s National Mutt Day event in December.  Our next Library Literacy event will be in November with a fire safety assembly for families.  Another potential meeting topic includes:  building children’s vocabulary and language with FPC’s speech and language pathologist, Sandra Lee.  Additional ideas will be further discussed at an upcoming PAC Meeting. These joint events are intended to promote the importance of literacy in our community.

 

Item #6      Measurements of Academic Progress (MAP) Family Reports (LCAP 1, AMO 1, LCAP 2, AMO 1) Mara Shinn Smith, Reading Intervention Specialist (Informational Item)

 

Mara Shinn Smith reminded the committee that the NWEA Family Report is the report that will be presented during parent conferences.  This new report is family friendly and explains MAP testing as well as a brief description of RIT scores.  Mara will print these reports for teachers within the next few weeks in time for conferences.

 

Announcements:

 

Mr. Parra announced that the first reporting period memo will go out by this Friday for parent conferences and the translation schedule.

 

Coco Salazar, Wendy Kaufman and Mara Shinn Smith attended the Reading is Fundamental (RIF) Orientation which was both informative and inspirational.  Coco invited a member of RIF’s board of directors to participate in FPC’s National Mutt Day event on December 2, 2019.  In addition, a representative from PBS Kids/So. Cal spoke and shared that their organization was available as a resource for schools to present on various topics.  Coco and Mara have a planned phone conference with the representative in November about potential presentation opportunities for FPC families.

 

Mara Shinn Smith announced that our some members of our Intervention Committee submitted a proposal to present at the FCPS Student Symposium on November 1st.  The group for this presentation is comprised of:  herself, Karen Knapp, Sarah Ananta, Annie Yi, Judy Lee and Brianna Ellis.

 

Mara Shinn Smith shared that she recently participated in The Reading League conference in Syracuse, NY and attended a session on early literacy and brain research with Dr. Carolyn Strom, a former Fenton teacher.  We are working with Dr. Strom on tentative dates in hopes she will be available to present at an upcoming spring PD.

 

Lastly, our Learning Walks have been going very well and the teachers have reported many positive, engaging and inspirational teaching strategies being observed.

 

Next Regular Meeting:  TBA

 

Adjournment:

 

By MOTION of Sirui Thomassian, SECONDED by Abigail Lopez-Dee and CARRIED, the Instruction Committee Meeting was adjourned at 7:48 AM.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Karen Knapp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

 

 Instruction Committee

October 23, 2019

7:15 a.m. – Auditorium  

 

Minutes

Call to Order: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

A meeting of the Instruction Committee was held on Wednesday, October 23, 2019, at 7:16 A.M. in the auditorium at Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School at 1022 N. Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, California, 90038.

 

Roll Call: Jennifer Flynn, Co-Secretary 

Present: Gaby Arroyo, Cassondra Barrett, Angela Boyd, Grisel Benn, Sasha Gongora, Caroline Engel, Jennifer Flynn, Kimberly Kiser, Jazmin Luna, Jennifer Nishimoto, Jocelyn O’Brien, Cary Rabinowitz, Carmen Solis, Fabiola Vega

Excused: Robin Rodriguez and Lisa Morales

Absent: Kyra Requiestas

Non Council Members Present: Bunny Wolfer 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda:  Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

There were no corrections or additions to the agenda. 

Approval of Minutes: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

 

Item #1 Minutes from the October 16, 2019 meeting of the Instruction Committee (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Caroline Engel SECONDED by Fabiola Vega and CARRIED, the minutes of the Instruction Committee from October 16, 2019 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Gaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto, Co-Chairs

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Instruction Committee on any

proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public. 

 

Old Business:   

 

Item #3 Jefferson Elementary School - Apple School Tours (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 5), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

Mr. Rabinowitz shared that he, Jazmin Luna, Sandra Hernandez, and Ariana Gomez had a productive visit to Jefferson Elementary School in the Compton Unified School district on October 22, 2019 in order to learn more about how to successfully gain Apple Distinguished School Status. Jefferson is similar in population, resources, community, and history to our school, and he hopes that future teachers and administrators visiting on January 28th, February 25th, and March 24th will also find their visits to be inspiring and reassuring. He stated that the visit reinforced all of the technology integration work that we are already doing at Santa Monica. There are still some spaces left for teachers to visit. Interested teachers should contact him if they would like to join one of the tours. Currently there are more primary teachers signed up to attend, so 4th-6th grade teachers are encouraged to indicate their interest to Mr. Rabinowitz. 

 

Item #4 Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Self-Study Visit, (LCAP Goals 1-3), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

Santa Monica’s WASC 6th year cycle of accreditation is up in 2020. We will begin our first year of self-study March 9-11, 2020. The accreditation process is intricate in the forms of input needed from various stakeholders in the school: students, teachers, parents, and community members. Our LAUSD oversight visit is one month prior on February 6, 2020 which will help us prepare for the WASC visit. 

 

Item #5 Spring 2020 CUE Conference Approval (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 2), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Motion to Approve)

 

The CUE Conference (Computer Using Educators) will take place March 19-21, 2020. The conference will help to support our school in the use of technology in the classrooms. Currently our Instructional Coaches will attend. Teachers wishing to join them should contact Ms. Rodriguez. We would like to send a 5-6 member team. 

 

On MOTION of Kimberly Kiser SECONDED by Fabiola Vega and CARRIED, the proposal to send a team of teachers to the CUE conference was approved. 

 

Item #6 CA STEAM Symposium Approval (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 2), Cary Rabinowitz, Director

(Motion to Approve)

 

The CA STEAM Symposium will take place December 9-10 in Anaheim during Computer Science Education Week. Ariana Gomez, Tiene Hauck, Donald Ausherman, and Jazmin Luna are currently planning to attend. 

 

On MOTION of Jazmin Luna SECONDED by Caroline Engel and CARRIED, the proposal to send a team of teachers to the CA STEAM Symposium was approved. 

 

Item #7 Reading is Fundamental (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 2, LCAP Goal 2, AMO 1), Gaby Arroyo, Instruction 

Co-Chair (Informational Item)

 

The first Literacy Day for PreK-3rd grade will occur on October 31, 2019. Teachers should please send their book bags to Mrs. Arroyo as soon as possible. Lead Teachers please email Mrs. Arroyo with the activity your grade level is planning to conduct. 

 

New Business: 

 

Item #8 Schoolsite Council and Advisory Committee Training-for-Trainers Workshop (LCAP Goal 3, AMO 2), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Motion to Approve)

 

Mr. Rabinowitz will attend the Schoolsite Council Advisory Committee Training-for-Trainers Workshop on November 13th. This committee will continue to be a part of our school in the coming years. 

 

On MOTION of Caroline Engel SECONDED by Kimberly Kiser and CARRIED, the motion for Mr. Rabinowitz to attend the Schoolsite Council and Advisory Committee Training-for-Trainers Workshop passed. 

 

Item #9 Fenton Charter Public Schools Student Achievement Symposium (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 1-4), Cary Rabinowitz SMBCCS Director (Informational Item)

 

The First Annual FCPS Student Achievement Symposium will take place at Santa Monica on Friday, November 1st. Mr. Rabinowitz shared his appreciation to all SMBCCS staff members who submitted proposals to present. The event will begin at 8:00 A.M. Teachers should plan to arrive early, as parking could be difficult. We will utilize the main yard as well as our regular parking lot, and support staff will be present to help direct traffic. Keynote sessions will take place in the auditorium, the staff lounge, and Caroline Engel’s room. All other sessions will take place in the 5th grade and 3rd/4th grade corridors in the main building. Mr. Rabinowitz thanks all Santa Monica teachers for having their rooms clean, organized,  and ready for visitors. There will be a Sign-Up Genius that teachers will use to sign up for breakout sessions. He looks forward to the learning that will occur at the Symposium! 

 

Announcements

 

Grades are due to Lead Teachers on November 4th. Lead Teachers should make sure to review assessment reports with all teachers prior to this date to make sure that all grades are inputted. 

 

Teachers will complete the ELD Progress Monitoring Report for the 1st and 3rd reporting periods. We will review how to complete the form at our October 30th staff meeting.

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment

 

On MOTION of Caroline Engel SECONDED by Grisel Benn and CARRIED, the Instruction Committee adjourned at 7:37 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Curriculum and Assessment Council

October 24, 2019

7:15 a.m. – Conference Room

 

AGENDA

 

Call to Order: Lee Melo and Christopher Torres – Co-Chairs

 

The Curriculum and Assessment Council was called to order at 7:22 a.m. by Co-Chair Christopher Torres

 

Roll Call: Cynthia Eschenfelder and Robin Brenneisen – Secretaries

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Lee Melo and Christopher Torres – Co-Chairs

 

Members Present: Barbara Aragon, Marya Asadurian, Robin Brenneisen, Jacqueline Claudio, Cynthia Eschenfelder, Lee Melo, Leticia Padilla Parra, Cheryl Perkins, Jessi Tello, Christopher Torres, Rebecca Williamson

 

Members Excused: Otilia Lopez

 

Members Not Present: N/A 

 

Item #1 Minutes from the September 26, 2019 meeting of the Curriculum and Assessment Council (Motion to Approve)

 

On Motion of Cynthia Eschenfelder, SECONDED by Robin Brenneisen, and CARRIED, the minutes of the Curriculum and Assessment Council from September 26, 2019 were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public:  Lee Melo and Christopher Torres – Co-Chairs

 

Item #2                       Any persons desiring to address the Curriculum and Assessment Council on any proper matter.

 

 

Old Business: No Old Business

 

New Business:

 

Item #3 2019-2020 NWEA Map BOY Student Outcomes (LCAP 1, AMO 1), Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra reviewed the BOY NWEA MAP Data with the council. Based on the data, 40% of all students are in the 41st percentile or higher in Reading, and 37% of all students are in the 41st percentile or higher in Math. The information provided is not a direct measure or predictor for SBAC scores, but are good indicators for growth. MOY scores are better predictors for SBAC outcomes. 

Item #4 CA Dashboard Local Indicators (LCAP 2, AMO 1-4, LCAP 3, AMO 1-6), Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra reviewed California School Dashboard criteria for determining the “colors” given by the state. Chronic absenteeism is still a focus across schools to control and manage. 

 

Item #5 LAUSD CSD Annual Performance Based Visit, Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra informed the council that the annual performance based visit will be on Wednesday February 19, 2020. Preparation will begin soon and procedures will remain the same as in the past. LAUSD appreciates that FACS is able to submit documents on time and maintain organization. 

 

Item #6 Family Math Night (LCAP 2, AMO 1), Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra shared that the First Annual FACS Family Math Night was a success. It was well- attended and engaging for families, as well as staff. The option for hosting a secondary math night this school year will be presented at the School Community Relations Council, but the intention is to host another one in the next school year. 

 

Announcements: FCPS Wellness Plan Meeting- representatives from each school, including, but not limited to, a teacher representative, a parent representative, a student representative, a Nutrition Specialist, the Nurse, and an SNP Representative will be meeting to review the Wellness Policy for compliance. 

 

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBA

 

 

Adjournment: 

 

On the MOTION of Marya Asadurian, SECONDED by Jacqueline Claudio, and CARRIED, the Curriculum Assessment Council adjourned at 7:37 a.m.

 

Minutes submitted respectfully by Cynthia Eschenfelder and Robin Brenneisen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.3.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Avenue Charter School

Human Resource and Personnel Council

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Human Resource and Personnel Council

October 29, 2019

 

Call to Order: Mercedes Meeks, Council Co-Chairs

 

The Human Resource and Personnel Council meeting was called to order at 7:18 a.m. by the Council Co-Chair Mercedes Meeks

 

Roll Call: Karen Scharf, Secretary

 

Members Present: Lizette Adkisson, Barbara Ausherman, Louis Chernovsky, Leanna Hendrix, Mercedes Cordoba Meeks, DeAnn Michiels, Karen Scharf, Leticia Padilla Parra, Barbara Aragon, and Jessi Tello 

 

Members Excused: Karla Contreras, Lillian De La Torre, and David Valle

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda:  Mercedes Meeks, Council Co-Chair

 

There were no additions/corrections to the agenda

 

Approval of Minutes from October 15, 2019: Mercedes Meeks, Council Co-Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the October 15, 2019 meeting of the Human Resource and Personnel Council (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Leanna Hendrix, SECONDED by Lizette Adkisson, and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted

 

Presentations from the Public:  Mercedes Meeks, Council Co-Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Human Resource and Personnel Council on any proper matter.

 

Old Business: None

 

New Business:

 

Item #3 Staffing Update (LCAP 3, AMO 1), Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Padilla Parra informed the council that after considering different options to reorganize the 3rd Grade Classroom (Room 6) of Elizabeth Jimenez, it was determined that reorganizing and placing students with existing 3rd Grade teachers at FACS would be in the student’s and school’s best interest. Mrs. Padilla Parra and Ms. Jimenez consulted and conferenced together to establish placement of existing students with 3rd Grade Teachers. 

 

Item #4 Revised Staff Roster (LCAP 1, AMO 1), Leticia Padilla Parra, FACS Director (Informational Item)

 

A new Fenton Avenue Charter School Roster was created that delineates the new number of 3rd Grade Teachers. There are now seven 3rd Grade Teachers. 

 

Announcements:

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment: On MOTION of Mercedes Meeks, the Human Resource and Personnel Council meeting adjourned at 7:30 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Karen Scharf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.4.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting

 

October 21, 2019

 

A meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee was held on Monday, October 21, 2019 at 7:18 am in Room 30 at Fenton Charter Leadership Academy at 8926 Sunland Blvd., Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

Call to Order: Lindsay Oquindo, Chair

 

The Parent Advocacy Committee meeting was called to order at 7:18 am by Chair, Lindsay Oquindo

 

Roll Call: Kaitlyn Silva, Secretary

 

Parent Advocacy Committee Members Present: Lindsay Oquindo, Bridget Badro, Abigail Gillmore, Kaitlyn Silva, Jennifer Miller, Cecilia Quijano

 

Non-committee Members: Crisinda Ismail, Paige Piper, Elizabeth Marquez, Jennifer Pimentel, Kate Hetu, Sydney Crowe, Melissa Katchen

 

Members Excused: Susana Orozco, Michelle Raxlin

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Lindsay Oquindo, Chair

 

Item #6 title was changed from Halloween Parade to Haunted House Tour Schedule

 

The following item was added to the agenda:

 

Item #9 FCLA/STEM Student Recruitment Sub-Committee

Kate Hetu, FCLA 2nd Grade Teacher, Focus Lead (Motion to Approve)

 

Approval of Minutes: Lindsay Oquindo, Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the September 3, 2019 Meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee  (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Kaitlyn Silva, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Lindsay Oquindo, Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Parent Advocacy Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: None

There was no old business.

 

New Business:

 

Item #3 Family Math Night, (LCAP 2, AMO 1), 

Jennifer Miller, FCLA/STEM Director (Informational Item)

 

Family Math Night is taking place October 25 from 5-6 pm. Doors will open at 4:30 for the families who participated in the pizza pre-sale. Breezy Freeze (a shaved ice truck) will be set-up right outside of campus, like Kona Ice had done in the past. Math stations will be set-up around the school in a “u-shape.” K-1 will be set up outside. Grades 2-5 will be set up in the MPR. The Haunted House entrance will be through the courtyard outside. The orange corridor will have the number line (4th grade) and estimation station (2nd and 3rd grade). The math stations will then end there and they can continue out the yellow hallway to exit or wrap around again. This event will help encourage students to see math as a fun activity and something they can be looking forward to! It is also a great way to connect parents and families within the Academies’ community!

 

Item #4 Haunted House Fundraiser, 

Jennifer Pimentel, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Motion to Approve)

 

This year FCLA/STEM is bringing back the Haunted House Fundraiser after a one-year hiatus. An entrance fee of $2 will be collected at the start of the Haunted House. All of the collected money will go towards the Student Body Fund and any left-over funds will go towards field trips, grade level needs, etc. The Haunted House will open at 5:00 pm on Friday, October 25th and run until 6:00 pm, happening at the same time as Family Math Night.

 

On MOTION of Kaitlyn Silva, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the Haunted House Fundraiser was approved.

 

Item #5 Scholastic Book Fair, (LCAP 2, AMO 1),

Cecilia Quijano, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Informational Item)

 

Sales began Friday but there have been book fair system adjustments to allow for efficiency. Students are entering 5-7 at a time. Students have been given reminders while in line that they need to have money ready to go otherwise they must wait until after school to enter with their parents to make sure the students are not wasting recess time. After school, parents have been very helpful and shown great initiative to help students stay organized and behaved. Student Council did a great job of promoting the book fair, as well, with posters posted around the school. The book fair will last until Thursday, October 24th.

 

Item #6 Haunted House Tour Schedule, (LCAP 2, AMO 1),

Cecilia Quijano, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Informational Item)

 

The Haunted House Tour Schedule will be printed and put inside teachers’ boxes in the upcoming week. It is available for students of Grades 2-5. It will also still be optional for all 2nd-5th grade students, as there are students who would prefer not to walk through. Not related to the Haunted House Tour Schedule, next Thursday is Halloween and the school will follow a modified recess and lunch to accommodate the Halloween Parade that same afternoon.

 

Item #7 Red Ribbon Week, (LCAP 2, AMO 1),

Melissa Katchen, FCLA/STEM School Counselor (Informational Item)

 

Red Ribbon Week is a schoolwide event that will take place from Monday, October 28th through Thursday, October 31st.  The schedule is as follows: Monday: Wear Red, Tuesday: Dress for success (“What You Want to Be When You Grow Up”), Wed: Crazy Sock Day, Thursday: Say “BOO” to drugs – Halloween costumes. October is also anti-bullying month so there will be efforts to combine this awareness with Red Ribbon Week. Stickers will be handed out on Monday and on Wednesday pencils will be handed out. This will help remind students to be thinking about the importance of Red Ribbon Week throughout the entirety of the week. Ms. Katchen has prepared activities for students to decorate their own red ribbons. Teachers can display these decorated red ribbons on the outside of the classroom to show awareness and school support for the cause. She also has video resources to share with classroom teachers to be shown throughout the week. During Red Ribbon Week, morning announcements will be led by fourth and fifth graders starting Friday, October 25 who will meet with Ms. Katchen on Wednesday, October 23rd to have time to prepare and practice their lines.

 

Item #8 Student Council Socktober Sock Drive Fundraiser, (LCAP 2, AMO 1), 

Paige Piper, FCLA/STEM Student Council (Motion to Approve)

 

The Student Council Socktober Sock Drive Fundraiser is a fundraiser that collects donations of new pairs of socks and donates them to local shelters. This is a nationwide fundraiser that has been made initially by Soul Pancake that FCLA/STEM will now be participating. The outreach sub-committee of Student Council has already made posters, planned out collection times, going to each classroom until the end of the fundraiser, and made other preparations for this fundraiser. Student Council representatives will come to each class to pick up donations daily. The last day that socks can be collected is Thursday, October 31st.

 

On MOTION of Kaitlyn Silva, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the Socktober fundraiser was approved.

 

Item #9 FCLA/STEM Student Recruitment Sub-Committee

Kate Hetu, FCLA 2nd Grade Teacher, Focus Lead (Motion to Approve)

 

Due to decreased enrollment across the Los Angeles area, it is important to have recruitment on the STEM/FCLA’s mind. The members of this committee will work together to brainstorm different ideas to increase advertisement of STEM/FCLA, organize community events held at the schools, utilizing technology to spread and other ways to promote the Academies in the community. Recruitment is something that concerns the school year-round and would be a beneficial addition to the STEM/FCLA committees. This comes at an important time for STEM/FCLA as we are submitting a charter revision it could be very important for next year, especially.

 

On MOTION of Kaitlyn Silva, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the FCLA/STEM Student Recruitment sub-committee was approved.

 

Announcements: 

 

None

 

Next Regular Meeting:

 

The next meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee will be held at a later date, to be determined.

 

Adjournment: 

On MOTION of Kaitlyn Silva, SECONDED by Abigail Gillmore, and CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee adjourned at 7:44 am.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Kaitlyn Silva, Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton STEM Academy

 

Unapproved Minutes of the 

Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting

 

October 21, 2019

 

A meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee was held on Monday, October 21, 2019 at 7:19 AM in room 30 at Fenton STEM Academy at 8926 Sunland Blvd., Sun Valley, CA  91352.

 

Call to Order: Sydney Crowe, Chair

 

The Parent Advocacy Committee meeting was called to order at 7:19 AM by Chair, Sydney Crowe.

 

Roll Call: Crissy Ismail, Secretary

 

Parent Advocacy Committee Members Present: Sydney Crowe, Elizabeth Marquez, Crissy Ismail, Melissa Katchen, Jennifer Miller, Cecilia Quijano

 

Non-committee Members: Kate Hetu, Bridget Badro, Lindsay Oquindo, Abigail Gilmore, Jennifer Pimentel, Paige Piper

 

Members Excused: Tony Peña 

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Sydney Crowe, Chair

 

Item #6  Title was changed from Halloween Parade to Haunted House Tour Schedule

Item #9  FCLA/STEM Student Recruitment Sub-Committee was added to the agenda

 

Approval of Minutes: Sydney Crowe, Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the September 3, 2019 Meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee.  (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Crissy Ismail SECONDED by Elizabeth Marquez and CARRIED, the minutes were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Sydney Crowe, Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Parent Advocacy Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public.

 

Old Business: There was no old business.

 

New Business: 

 

Item #3 Family Math Night, (LCAP 2, AMO 1), 

Jennifer Miller, FCLA/STEM Director (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Miller reminded the committee that Family Math Night will be held on Friday October 25, 2019 from 5 to 6 PM. Parents and students will walk throughout the school in a U formation to find different math stations. The areas will be as follows: Area B will contain pizza that was preordered by families, Area C will be occupied with Kindergarten and first grade math stations, the MPR will contain 2nd grade – 5th grade math stations and there will also be an estimation station held out in the hallway. Lastly, the haunted house will be open to parents and students in the Hands on Lab. Family Math Night is held to encourage family interaction and playing games centered around mathematics therefore, strengthening math skills and increasing student interest and achievement.  

 

Item #4 Haunted House Fundraiser, 

Jennifer Pimentel, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Motion to Approve)

 

Mrs. Pimentel reminded us that this year we are bringing back the haunted house by popular demand of parents and students. The admission fee will be $2 on Family Math Night. Funds raised will be deposited into the FCLA and STEM Student Body Accounts. 

 

On MOTION of Crissy Ismail SECONDED by Elizabeth Marquez and CARRIED, the haunted house fundraiser was approved.

 

Item #5 Scholastic Book Fair, (LCAP 2, AMO 1), 

Cecilia Quijano, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Quijano gave a quick update on the scholastic book fair stating that sales are going great so far. She asked that teachers please remind their students that recess time is only for students who have money to purchase books/items. If they would like to preview the book fair again, it is encouraged they ask their parents to bring them afterschool from 3 to 4 PM. Mrs. Quijano wanted to acknowledge and thank student council for creating the posters to promote the book fair.

 

Item #6 Haunted House Tour Schedule, (LCAP 2, AMO 1)

Cecilia Quijano, FCLA/STEM Administrative Coordinator (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Quijano distributed a haunted house tour schedule. Teachers may bring their classrooms to the haunted house on their assigned date and time. Mrs. Quijano reminded the committee that the haunted house is aimed towards second to fifth grade. It was also brought up that on Halloween we will follow a minimum day schedule. 

 

Item #7 Red Ribbon Week, (LCAP 2, AMO 1)

Melissa Katchen, FCLA/STEM School Counselor (Informational Item)

 

Mrs. Katchen briefly discussed the plans for Red Ribbon Week which will be held October 28 – October 31st. Monday will be wear red day, Tuesday will be dress for success day, Wednesday crazy sock day, and Thursday students will wear their Halloween costumes to school. Mrs. Katchen let us know that this year she has combined Red Ribbon Week with national anti-bullying month. Mrs. Katchen described different activities that you can do with your classroom to encourage participation in Red Ribbon Week. Mrs. Katchen will email 4th and 5th grade teachers to get student volunteers for morning announcements during the week. 

 

Item #8 Student Council Socktober Sock-Drive Fundraiser (LCAP 2, AMO 1), Paige Piper, FCLA/STEM Student Council (Motion to Approve)

 

Ms. Piper shared that the student outreach committee will be doing Socktober starting October 21, 2019. Student council will be collecting new socks of any size for the homeless community. Socktober is a Nationwide fundraiser created in collaboration with Kid President. Students will stop by classrooms with a box for collection of socks. The last day for donations will be October 31, 2019.

 

On MOTION of Crissy Ismail SECONDED by Elizabeth Marquez and CARRIED, the Student Council Socktober Sock-Drive Fundraiser was approved. 

 

Item #9 FCLA/STEM Student Recruitment Sub-Committee 

Kate Hetu, 2nd Grade Teacher/Focus Lead (Motion to Approve)

 

Due to decreased enrollment it is important to continue a strong presence in the community. Mrs. Hetu is proposing we create a recruitment sub-committee to help in the efforts to increase student enrollment. The committee will be involved in community events, creating community events on our campus, etc. all year long. Increased student enrollment can help with the upcoming addition of 6th grade. If interested in being a part of this committee please contact Kate Hetu. 

 

On MOTION of Crissy Ismail SECONDED by Elizabeth Marquez and CARRIED, the student recruitment sub-committee was approved.

 

Announcements: None

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment: 

 

On MOTION of Crissy Ismail SECONDED by Elizabeth Marquez and CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee adjourned at 7:45 AM.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Elizabeth Marquez, Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Fenton Primary Center

 

Unapproved Minutes of the

Parent Advocacy Committee

 

November 8, 2019

 

A meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee was held on Friday, November 8, 2019 at 7:15 a.m. in room 115 of the Fenton Primary Center at 11351 Dronfield Avenue, Pacoima, CA, 91331.

Call to Order: Coco Salazar, Co-Chair 

 

The Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting was called to order at 7:16 a.m. by Co-Chair, Coco Salazar.    

 

Roll Call: Diana Lucas, Secretary

 

Members Present:   Coco Salazar, Bridget Ruiz, Diana Lucas, Gurpreet Gill, Nina Ferman, Sarah Lin, Richard Parra, Wendy Kaufman, Tony Peña, Sirui Thomassian, Juan Gomez

 

Members Excused: Felix Carillo, Robyn Gallo, Paola Ramirez, Christina Peña, Karen Knapp, Mara Shinn-Smith

 

Members Absent: None

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Coco Salazar, Co-Chair

 

There is one correction and two additions made to the agenda. 

 

Corrections: 

 

Item #13 will be presented by Nina Ferman instead of Coco Salazar. 

 

Additions: 

 

Item #15         Approval of New Parent Member into PAC (LCAP 2, AMO 1 and 2) – Coco Salazar, FPC Co-Chair (Motion to Approve) 

 

Item #16    FPC Instagram Account (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Richard Parra, FPC Director (Motion to Approve)

 

Approval of Minutes from October 18, 2019: Coco Salazar, Co-Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the October 18, 2019 meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee (Motion to Approve)

 

On MOTION of Nina Ferman, SECONDED by Juan Gomez, and CARRIED, the Minutes of the Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting of October 18, 2019, were approved as submitted.

 

Presentations from the Public: Bridget Ruiz, Co-Chair

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Parent Advocacy Committee on any proper matter.

 

There were no presentations from the public. 

 

Old Business:

 

Item #3 National Mutt Day Schedule (LCAP 2, AMO 2) – Nina Ferman, FPC Mutt-i-grees Lead (Informational)

 

FPC Mutt-i-grees Lead, Nina Ferman, gave an update on this year’s first Reading Is Fundamental literacy event, National Mutt Day, scheduled for December 2, 2019.   Mrs. Ferman shared the schedule for the event.  There will be three assemblies by grade level featuring guest author, Laura Marlowe, and the reading of her book Tommy the Throwaway Dog.  The reading will be followed by a Q & A and then a special performance by the FPC Chorus who will sing a song from the Tommy the Throwaway Dog musical.   Additionally, six reading therapy dogs have been scheduled to attend the event to ensure that every classroom will have a visit and photo opportunity with a therapy dog. 

 

Item #4 World’s Finest Chocolate Sale Update (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Tony Peña, Family Center Director (Informational)

 

Tony Peña shared that the total sale from the fall chocolate fundraiser was $13,607.00.  FPC’s total net profit was $5,728.69 after deducting the cost for incentives and the cost of the chocolates. Tony Peña stated that the McDonald’s Happy Meal party for the top selling class was successful and it was suggested that we continue this as an incentive in the future. 

 

Item #5 American Cancer Society Donation Drive Update (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Bridget Ruiz, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Informational)

 

The American Cancer Society Donation drive was a success. The total raised and donated to this cause was $1365. 

 

Item #6 Chorus Fundraiser Update (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Bridget Ruiz, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Informational)

 

Mrs. Filichia’s Chorus t-shirt sale resulted in a profit of $221.00.  Mrs. Filichia will continue exploring options for fundraising in order to purchase music for the Spring musical.

 

New Business:

 

Item #7 LVT Library Event #2 (LCAP 2, AMO 2) – Richard Parra, FPC Director (Motion to Approve)

 

Richard Parra shared that the next LVT library event is scheduled for November 14, 2019.  Flyers will be sent out. The event will consist of a presentation on Fire Safety, sponsored by the Children’s Burn Foundation. This event will not be a pre-registered event. An email will be sent out to the staff to ask for teacher representation. The event will be held from 3:30 4:30 p.m. Since parking is limited at the library, parents will be reminded that there is plenty of parking at the Discovery Cube and park located next to the library. 

 

On MOTION of Diana Lucas, SECONDED by Gurpreet Gill, and CARRIED, the LVT Library Event #2 was approved.

 

Item #8 Santa Pictures Fundraiser (LCAP 2, AMO 1)Bridget Ruiz, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Motion to Approve)

 

Mrs. Ferman, Ms. Salazar, and Miss Valle have requested their annual Santa Picture fundraiser.  The fundraiser will run from December 2, 2019 to December 13, 2019, with pictures with Santa taken on Friday, December 13. The funds raised will be used to attend a musical field trip, pay for bus transportation, and student t-shirts to wear on the field trip. Photos will be distributed prior to winter vacation. 

 

On MOTION of Wendy Kaufman, SECONDED by Sirui Thomassian, and CARRIED, the Santa Pictures Fundraiser was approved.

 

Item #9 Enrollment Committee Update (LCAP 2, AMO 2) – Richard Parra, FPC Director 

(Informational)

 

Richard Parra shared that the enrollment sub-committee met and discussed various ideas to continue promoting our school and increase enrollment.  Some suggestions included visiting local pre-schools, putting up banners at the local Softball/T-ball fields and at the corner of the Hansen Dam Golf Course, creating and distributing bumper stickers, participating in local community events, and creating a social media (Instagram) account for FPC. Enrollment for the 2020-2021 school year will begin in March, 2020. 

 

Item #10 Pacoima Parade (LCAP 2, AMO 2) – Coco Salazar, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Motion to Approve)

 

Coco Salazar shared that FPC is looking into registering to participate in Pacoima’s 52nd Annual Holiday Parade scheduled to take place on Saturday, December 14, 2019. This is a local community event which could help promote our school.  Every teacher will be encouraged to participate and represent our school. The parade theme is “Childhood Memories and Wishes Beyond” and the Enrollment Committee is looking for ideas or suggestions to create a float and highlight our school. 

 

On MOTION of Nina Ferman, SECONDED by Bridget Ruiz, and CARRIED, participation in the Pacoima Parade was approved.

 

Item #11 RIF Bookmark Contest (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Coco Salazar, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Motion to Approve)

 

Reading is Fundamental (RIF) holds an annual bookmark contest.  RIF SoCal invites students to design a bookmark to show everyone why they think reading is FUNdamental and important.  If their design is chosen as one of the winners of their contest, thousands of copies will be printed and distributed to over 70,000 children over the next program year!  As a winner they will receive special recognition and some incentives.  The contest rules and format will be shared with teachers to share with the students to see if any student wishes to enter the contest. The deadline to submit their artwork is January 31, 2020.

 

On MOTION of Nina Ferman, SECONDED by Wendy Kaufman, and CARRIED, the RIF Bookmark Contest was approved.

 

Item #12 Attendance Incentives (LCAP 2, AMO 3) – Coco Salazar, FPC PAC Co-Chair (Discussion and/or Action)

 

Coco Salazar began a discussion on the Attendance/Tardy Policy and current incentives.   There is a concern about the limited information shared with parents on the Home School Contract regarding Independent Studies, the tardy policy, and the attendance incentives.  There is also a concern about the restrictions on the current incentives.  Currently there is a limit of 10 tardies to qualify for the attendance medal.  There also appears to be a limit on tardies for the monthly brag tag incentive.  However, students who have completed Independent Study do qualify for the brag tag, even though they were not physically present.  It was expressed that when we are promoting attendance and are trying to get students in school, it would make sense to also reward the students who have surpassed the tardy limit, but have actually been physically present. 

 

Additionally, there has been a request for clarification regarding the policy on lice and how long students have to be in attendance to be marked present.  

 

Ms. Salazar has reached out to Dr. Riddick, Mrs. Sumida, and Mr. Gutierrez for clarification.   Mrs. Sumida would like to get Mr. Gutierrez’ input in order to make a decision and have all schools within the organization follow that decision.   This will be written in the Home-School Agreement so that parents are aware as well. 

 

Item #13 Winter Spirit Week (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Nina Ferman, FPC Mutt-i-grees Lead (Motion to Approve)

 

Nina Ferman shared that this year’s Winter Spirit Week theme will revolve around Mutt-i-gress and be titled, “Happy Paw-lidays”.  Pack Party Week will also run from December 16 to December 20. The school will be decorated with a Mutt-i-gree/Holiday theme.  All students will take home a stocking to create a message that promotes the humane treatment of four-legged friends.  Stockings will be due on Friday, November 15 and be displayed throughout the school for the entire month of December.  Mutt-i-grees will also have a canned food, towel, and blanket drive which will run from December 9 – 20.  These items will be donated to two animal shelters.  The daily theme for each day of our Mutti-grees Holiday Spirit Week is as follows:  

 

    • ïMonday, “Candy Cane-ines” - wear Red or White.
    • ïTuesday, “May Your Days Be Furry and Bright”- wear Christmas, holiday, or winter accessories 
    • ïWednesday, “We Believe in Santa Paws” - wear any holiday, winter or Christmas attire.
    • ïThursday, “Silent Night” - wear Christmas, holiday, or winter PAWjamas.
    • ïFriday, “Fur-Baby, It’s Cold Outside” - wear an UGLY Christmas, holiday or winter sweater.

 

On MOTION of Bridget Ruiz, SECONDED by Sirui Thomasian, and CARRIED, the Winter Spirit Week was approved.

 

Item #14 No-Cost Health Screenings (LCAP 2, AMO 2) – Richard Parra, FPC Director (Informational)

 

Mr. Parra informed the committee that “Smiles.Org” will be performing dental screenings and deep cleaning free of charge with parental permission.  “Vision on Wheels” is also scheduled to give every child a free eye exam in December, followed by a formal eye exam in their mobile clinic in April 2020.

 

Item #15   Approval of New Parent Member into PAC (LCAP 2, AMO 1 and 2) – Coco Salazar, FPC Co-Chair (Motion to Approve) 

 

Coco Salazar presented Cindy Soto, a parent from our community and current FPC parent, who has attended and participated in three consecutive meetings and wishes to be an official, voting member on the PAC committee.

 

On MOTION of Bridget Ruiz, SECONDED by Richard Parra, and CARRIED, the addition of parent, Cindy Soto, to the PAC committee was approved.

 

Item #16   Approval of FPC Instagram Account (LCAP 2, AMO 1) – Richard Parra, FPC Director (Motion to Approve)

 

The enrollment committee has discussed various ways of promoting FPC.  They have been reviewing other surrounding schools and their use of social media to promote their school and provide the community with information regarding programs and events happening at their school. After reviewing various social media platforms, it was determined that Instagram would be the best social media platform for FPC to use and start sharing information about our school to the public, especially with neighboring schools already using this free advertisement platform. Mrs. Ferman has spent considerable time reviewing the security and impact of opening an account for FPC.  Staff were informed that once the account is open, they are invited to “follow”.  Nevertheless, if they have a personal account, it is highly recommended that they make their account private or otherwise not follow FPCs account.  Mrs. Ferman will oversee the account.  Commenting will not be allowed; only pictures will be displayed.  We find that opening this social media account can be a great way to promote our school and continue to increase our enrollment.  

 

On MOTION of Nina Ferman, SECONDED by Coco Salazar, and CARRIED, the Opening of an FPC Instagram Account was approved.

 

Announcements:   

 

Next Regular Meeting: TBD

 

Adjournment: On MOTION of Gurpreet Gill, SECONDED by Sirui Thomassian, CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee meeting was adjourned at 7:53 a.m.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by: Diana Lucas  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

Santa Monica Blvd. Community Charter School

Parent Advocacy Committee

 

November 14, 2019

7:15 a.m. – Auditorium  

 

MINUTES

 

Call to Order: Ariana Gomez and Evelia Manzo, Co-Chairs

 

The Parent advocacy meeting was called to order in the auditorium at 7:19 a.m.. 

Ariana Gomez, Co-Chair.

 

Roll Call: Amanda Hill, Co-Secretary

 

Present: Siranush Akopyan, Virginia Casares, Ariana Gomez, Amanda Hill, Emma Kath, David Levinson, Evelia Manzo, Roshani Solanki, Bunny Wolfer, Cary Rabinowitz, Monica Casteneda

 

Excused: Carina Adra, Denise Molina, Evelyn Neglia

 

Absent: Johana Juarez

 

Non-Committee Members Present:

 

Additions/Corrections to the Agenda: Evelia Manzo, Co-Chair

 

There were no additions or corrections.

 

Approval of Minutes: Evelia Manzo, Co-Chair

 

Item #1 Minutes from the September 5, 2019 meeting of the Parent Advocacy Committee.

 

On MOTION of Bunny Wolfer, SECONDED by Virginia Casares, and CARRIED, the minutes of the Parent Advocacy Meeting held on September 5th, 2019 were approved as is.

 

Presentations from the Public: Ariana Gomez, Co-Chair

 

Item #2 Any persons desiring to address the Parent Advocacy Committee on any proper matter.

 

None

 

Old Business: There was no old business

 

New Business:

 

Item #3 2018-2019 Released CAASPP Summative Assessment Results (LCAP Goal 1, AMO 1-2) Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Mr. Rabinowitz explained to the committee that the official results were released for the CAASPP Summative Assessment. For math, the percentage of students that received 3’s or 4’s was 36.5% and for ELA it was 41.3%. The 18-19 math percentage increased by 4.9 points from the previous year and ELA decreased 4.7 points from the previous year. Two years ago SMBCCS placed a focus on ELA instruction and saw a large gain in their ELA percentage on SBAC. Since math was the focus last year, we saw a large gain in our math percentage, and a slight decrease in ELA. In comparison to the schools around us, SMBCCS has a 96.3% free and reduced lunch percentage which is at least 5% more than every other school in the area. Our English Learner population is 55% post reclassification, which is at least 6% more than all other schools in the area. These numbers show that are students are at a much higher poverty rate than other schools and at a greater academic need.  Despite this fact, SMBCCS was still able to outperform the majority of schools in the area on both the Math and ELA SBAC assessments. Mr. Rabinowitz thanked teachers for their hard work and dedication to student success last year.

 

Item #4 FCPS Local School Wellness, (LCAP Goal 2, AMO 2), Cary Rabinowitz SMBCCS Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Fenton has a committee made up of members from all of the schools as a part of our local wellness plan. The wellness 

plan outlines specific guidelines in regards to student nutrition and general health. The plan also ensures that students are attending psychomotor each week and that they are being provided with nutritious school meals for breakfast and lunch. Classroom parties should be held no more than once a month during the last 30 minutes of class and nutritious snack options should be provided. Fenton receives child nutrition funding so we need to meet specific guidelines in order to continue receiving the funding and working with School Nutrition Plus.

 

Item #5 SMBCCS STEAM Assemblies, Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Ariana informed the committee that we held 

our first STEAM assembly, The Magic of Science, on October 11th. The STEAM 

Team has received good feedback from both teachers and students about the assembly. They are planning to have a Cirque du Soleil themed assembly next semester and will hopefully have one more after SBAC. Mr. Rabinowitz thanked our STEAM leads for taking this on and ensuring that STEAM is represented as an integral part of our school.

 

Item #6 Fall/Winter Fundraiser Updates, Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. The SMBCCS parking lot was used for the Dia De Los Muertos celebration hosted at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Mr. Rabinowitz thanked everyone that participated in this fundraiser (Aaron Veals, Ariana Gomez, AJ Smith, Carmen Solis, Caroline Engle, David Levinson, Tiene Hauck, and Zoe Weiss). Also, a special thank you was given to our custodial staff, Elvin Reyes and Ivan Juarez, for also helping with the event. We were able to make over $5,300 from the event. We will be discussing the possibility of using the parking lot for other community events in the future. 

 

Item #7 Winter/Spring Fundraiser Approvals, Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Motion to Approve)

 

Ariana Gomez informed the committee that McTeachers night will be held on December 17th from 4:00-7:00 p.m. This fundraiser is a great opportunity for ourschool to partner with the community and provides us with new avenues to gain resources for our students. More information will be sent out via email about how teachers can volunteer for this event.

 

On MOTION of Siranush Akopyan, SECONDED by Roshani Solanki, and CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee approved the McTeachers Night Proposal.

 

Item #8 Parent Conference Week (LCAP Goal 2, AMO 1), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Ms. Castaneda explained that parent teacher conferences will be held next week. Each teacher gave Ms. Castaneda a copy of their schedule, so that the office can assist any parents that come in with questions about their time. Translators have been assigned to conferences that indicated a need for translation, however many conferences still need translators, specifically those conferences on Tuesday afternoon. Ms. Castaneda has reached out to all staff members for help with this, and thanks the many teachers that have volunteered to help translate for other teacher’s conferences in addition to their own. Ms. Castaneda reminded teachers to have parents sign in, and if the parents do not show up for their conference, to bring the student’s report card to the office in an addressed envelope to be sent in the mail. Mr. Rabinowitz reminded teachers to put their Record of Parent Conference form in his mailbox at the end of the week.

 

Item #9                    LAUSD CSD Annual Performance Based Oversight Visit (LCAP Goals 1-3), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This was an informational item only. Mr. Rabinowitz explained to the committee that SMBCCS will be visited by the LAUSD Charter School Division on February 6th. Our school will be rated in four categories: governance, student achievement, organizational management, and fiscal operations. The LAUSD team will come and observe in classrooms. We are excited for them to see small group instruction, technology integration, and Kagan Structures being implemented in the classroom. 

 

Item #10 Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Self-Study Visit, (LCAP Goals 1-3), Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This is an informational item only. Mr. Rabinowitz reported that as soon as we get 

back from Thanksgiving break we will focus our attention on the WASC self-study. WASC self-study happens every 6 years and our accreditation is coming to an end. We will be visited March 9th-11th. Our visitors will create a comprehensive report, visit classrooms, meet with focus groups made up of teachers and staff from varied assignments throughout the school, and meet with home groups made up of staff that work within the same category, ex: SPED.  We will meet as a staff on December 4th to review expectations during the visit and will also be meeting with lead teachers to discuss and create our groups. 

 

Item #11 SMBCCS California State Preschool Program, (LCAP Goal 2, AMO 2)Cary Rabinowitz, Director (Informational Item)

 

This is an informational item only. Mr. Rabinowitz explained that LAUSD receives CSPP funding to run programming at our site. We were contacted last year and informed that LAUSD will not be using our site any longer. SMBCCSwill be applying for state funding for a California State Preschool Program. We will be applying for grants and have brought on the lead grant writer formerly with YPI, Stan Saunders. Funding is provided based on priority areas. SMBCCS is a priority 3. We are confident in our application and that we will receive funding.

 

The due date for applications is at the beginning of December. In order to put ourselves in the best position with our application and get the most points we are applying for a full day (8+ hour) and full year (246 days) preschool. 

 

Announcements: 

 

December 11th is Code Night. An email will be sent with more information on 

stations and how to sign up to volunteer. 

 

During the week of parent teacher conferences there will be school uniform sales every day in the front office. Flyers will be sent out to parents as a reminder. A letter will also be going home with students in regards to the new policy about uniforms that will be implemented in January. Teachers should email Mr. Rabinowitz about students who are chronically not in uniform. 

 

Next Regular Meeting:  TBD

 

Adjournment: 

 

On MOTION of Bunny Wolfer, SECONDED by Roshani Solanki, and CARRIED, the Parent Advocacy Committee Meeting was adjourned at 7:52 am.

 

Minutes respectfully submitted by Amanda Hill and Emma Kath.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.B.4.a.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were no meetings of the School Site Councils or English Learner Advisory Committees

 since the October 24, 2019 FPCS Board Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. C. 

 

Financial Business Manager’s Report

(See presentation slides)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. D. 

 

Directors’ Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.1.

FENTON AVENUE CHARTER SCHOOL (FACS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

The mission of Fenton Avenue Charter School is to further instill the joy of learning by creating an environment that promotes confident, self-reliant, interdependent learners who become productive, contributing citizens of the community.

 

State Charter Number:  30

 

 

General Information on Enrollment and Attendance:

 

 

3rd

4th

5th

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

11/22/2019

192

227

216

635

97.94%

98.06%

 

Enrollment at Fenton Avenue Charter School is 635 students with ADA at 98.06%. Enrollment has decreased by two students since last month. 

 

Instruction

 

Parent Conference Week: FACS completed first trimester parent conferences in all 26 classrooms in November.  Parents met with teachers and support staff throughout the week to discuss student progress and strategies. Teachers also shared MAP testing student results with parents. Attendance was excellent.

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: FACS teachers will administer the Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments for the first time from January 21st – January 31st. The data from this testing administration allow us to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment window and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. Teachers will analyze student scores to differentiate their instruction based on student need. Teachers and administration will discuss this data during mid-year goal setting meetings in February.

ELPAC Computer-based Field Test Assessments: In November 2018, the State Board of Education approved a plan to transition the current paper-pencil ELPAC to a computer-based ELPAC. The computer-based ELPAC will replace the paper-pencil Summative ELPAC in February 2020 and the paper-pencil Initial ELPAC in July 2020. During the month of October, selected FACS students participated in the ELPAC Computer-based Field Test. This participation will assist the state in preparing for the switch to a completely computer-based platform in February 2020. Thank you to Barbara Aragón for all her work in administering this assessment, and to Veronica Ramos and Karla Contreras for their assistance. 

Personnel

 

First Semester Probationary Teacher Observations: All probationary staff completed their formal first semester observations in October and November.  FACS has four probationary staff members who participated in the observation process.  It was a successful and productive observation cycle. 

 

School Community

 

“Coffee with the Principal” Meetings: FACS hosted the second “Coffee with the Principal” meeting of the year on Friday, November 8th. During this meeting, the school Safety Plan was reviewed. Parents were very impressed and appreciative of the detail included in the plan. The asked excellent questions, and felt relieved to know that the school has a plan for any emergency that they asked about. The parents also connected with each other, and were provided information regarding community agencies that can provide assistance. It was a very productive meeting.

 

Winter Performances: Our annual Winter Performance for parents will be held on Friday, December 13, 2019. Teachers and students are busy preparing for this performance.

 

Social Emotional Learning: FACS has continued to receive regular visits from Fiona, “FCPS Therapy Dog.” Our Mutt-i-grees Team has coordinated an Animal Shelter Blanket Drive from December 4th through December 13th. Thank you to our Mutt-i-grees team and Barbara Aragón for continuing to find meaningful ways of implementing and supplementing our Social Emotional Learning program.

 

Facility Update

 

Intercom/Clock System Installation: Work continues on the installation of a new intercom/clock system in every room on the campus. This system will replace the outdated system currently in use and will enhance school safety. This work takes place after school hours. Thank you to our custodial staff for remaining on campus so that this work can be done.

 

Security Camera Installation: Security cameras are currently being installed throughout the campus and in the school parking lots.  These cameras significantly increase the school’s ability to monitor what occurs on campus during school hours as well as when the school is closed. Thank you to Jason Gonzalez for all of his work in making this happen as well as for his supervision of the installation. 

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

12/10 7:15-8:00 Human Resource and Personnel Council Meeting – Conference Room

12/11 7:15-8:00 School Community Relations Council Meeting – Conference Room

12/12 7:15-8:00 Budget, Safety, and Facilities Council Meeting – Conference Room

12/12 8:30-10:00 Neighborhood Action Council Meeting – Family Center

12/13 9:15-10:30 Fridays with Fiona – Library

12/13 2:00-2:30 Winter Holiday Parent Performance - Auditorium

12/17 11:00-4:00 Director Meeting – FCPS Offices

12/19 7:15-8:00 FACS School Site Council Meeting – Conference Room

12/19 8:30-10:00 Neighborhood Action Council Meeting – Family Center

12/20 6:30-8:00 Staff Holiday Breakfast – Studio

12/23-1/10 Winter Break

 

 

Item II.D.2.

SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL (SMBCCS)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School promotes academic achievement in a collaborative environment that creates self-confident, self-reliant learners who will become positive contributors to their communities.

 

State Charter Number:  446

 

ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE

 

Numbers as of November 22, 2019:

Monthly Attendance Average- 97.7%

Cumulative Attendance Average- 98.1% 

Grade Level and Schoolwide Enrollment

Date

Pre-K

TK

K

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

Total

11/22/19

70

19

122

122

118

137

132

`137

78

865

 

Enrollment: Santa Monica’s current enrollment is 865 students. Note the total in the table above does not include preschool enrollment.

 

INSTRUCTION

 

NWEATM MAP® Middle of Year (MOY) Assessments

Mid-Year MAP testing will begin immediately after students return from winter vacation on January 14th.  The testing window will close on January 31st. Students’ resulting RIT scores and achievement percentiles are used to determine growth and to continue to monitor student needs.  Teachers will be asked to specifically review the performance of their focus students identified at the beginning of the year to reflect on classroom practices implemented with these students and determine next steps.  MOY Map data will also be reviewed during Mid-Year Professional Goal Setting meetings set to begin February 11th.  

 

Progress Monitoring for English Learners

Per State requirements, SMBCCS must 1) Ensure that English learners acquire full proficiency in English and attain parity with native speakers of English, and 2) Ensure that English learners, within a reasonable period of time, achieve the same rigorous grade-level academic standards that are expected of all students.

 

To assist in meeting these two goals, Santa Monica teachers complete ELD Progress Reports aligned with the expectations of the California English Language Development Standards.  Teachers assess students across three Proficiency Levels, Emerging, Expanding, and Bridging, and sub-level stages, Early and Exit by reviewing their EL’s capabilities across three communicative modes - Collaborative, Interpretative, and Written/Oral Production.  Teachers complete these reports in the first grading period and in the third grading period for EL students on their roster.  This information is shared with parents during Parent Conference Week and documented on the child’s Report Card.

 

Professional Development

SMBCCS staff continued to participate in various professional development opportunities in October through December.  Also included below are conferences that have been scheduled for later this year.

 

Completed:

    • ïCalifornia Association of School Psychologists (CASP) Conference, October 24, 2019 (Kristine Khachian, Tashi Miller)
    • ïLAUSD Charter Operated Programs, Option 3:  Welligent Boot Camp 101 Training, October 25, 2019 (Carina Adra)
    • ïBureau of Education and Research:  Educational Specialist Training, October 30, 2019 (Jennifer Allen, Angela Boyd, Denise Molina)
    • ïFCPS Professional Development Day #4: Student Achievement Symposium, November 1, 2019 (Fenton Charter Public Schools)
    • ï504 Plan Staff Meeting Presentation, November 6, 2019 (Presenters - Kristine Khachian, Tashi Miller)
    • ïIntroduction to the Ready to Advance: Early Learners Pre-K Benchmark Curriculum, November 14, 2019 (Virginia Casares, Sasha Góngora, Bernadette Montajes, Lisa Morales, Robin Rodriguez) 

 

Ongoing:

    • ïApple Distinguished School Tours:  Thomas Jefferson Pre-K - 8 School, Compton Unified School District, October 22, 2019, January 28, 2019, February 25, 2020, March 24, 2020 

 

October:  Ariana Gomez, Sandra Hernandez, Jazmin Luna, Cary Rabinowitz

January:  Evelyn Neglia, Marie Kirakossian, Walter Gomez, Jennifer Flynn, Lisa Morales

February:  Fabiola Vega, Carmen Solis, Grisel Benn, Monica Castańeda, Denise Molina

March:  Bunny Wolfer, Kimberly Kiser, Robin Rodriguez, Amanda Hill, Donald Ausherman, Aaron Veals  

 

    • ïChildren’s Hospital of Los Angeles: Diabetes Training, November 13, 2019, December 11, 2019

 

November:  Beth Henschel, Tashi Miller, Robin Rodriguez

December:  Walter Gomez, Cary Rabinowitz

 

Scheduled:

    • ïCUE (Computer-Using-Educators) Conference, Palm Springs, CA, March 19-21, 2020 (Gaby Arroyo, Cassondra Barrett, Jocelyn Condo, Jennifer Nishimoto, Cary Rabinowitz, Nicole Reed, Zoe Weiss) 
    • ïSTEAM Symposium, Anaheim, CA, December 9-10, 2019 (Donald Ausherman, Ariana Gomez, Tiene Hauck, Jazmin Luna)

 

PERSONNEL

 

Main Office Staff Transitions:  Office Manager and Attendance Assistant

We are pleased to report to the Board that Marcela Guerrero, Santa Monica’s former Office Manager, interviewed and was selected to fill the vacant Payroll Specialist role in the Business Office on Monday, October 28th.  Marcela will be missed greatly at Santa Monica, but we know she will continue to be an asset to Fenton alongside the team in the business office.

 

Santa Monica held interviews on Tuesday, November 5th to fill the vacant Office Manager position and selected Erick Lazo, our former Attendance Assistant, to become our new Office Manager.  Erick started in this role on Tuesday, November 12th and has done a stellar job in the weeks leading up to the Thanksgiving break.  Interviews for our now vacant Attendance Assistant position will take place on Thursday, December 12th.

 

Probationary Teacher Formal Observation Lessons Completed

First semester observations have concluded for probationary teachers.  This process included a (1) pre-observation meeting between teacher and administration to review the lesson being presented and discuss steps to ensure its success; (2) a formal observation in the teacher’s classroom typically in the areas of English-language arts or Mathematics; (3) a post-observation meeting to reflect on the lesson presented to identify success, challenges, and areas to refine and/or revisit.  

 

Lessons this Fall focused on small group instruction in-line with the school’s continued focus in this area.  SMBCCS Administrators and FCPS Instructional Coaches attended lessons and provided valuable input and feedback to our teachers.  All observed teachers at Santa Monica are in their second year of probation and will present their final formal observation in the Winter of 2020.  

 

Mid-Year Teacher Assistant Evaluations

Teachers at SMBCCS are completing teacher assistant (TA) evaluations for Fall 2019.  Teachers work as a grade level to complete one evaluation for their assigned TA.  They then conference with their TA and provide commendations and recommendations for performance in the Spring semester.  TAs are scored on a scale of 1-5 with a score of 3 considered as “meeting job requirements.”  TAs are evaluated on attendance, working with students, performance within the classroom setting, and general professionalism.  Absences and tardies are also reviewed during this meeting as well as transcript submissions and Spring placements. 

 

Community Relations 

 

Fall Parent Conference Week, November 18th - 22nd 

Teachers and staff did a fantastic job preparing for our Fall Parent Conferences held the Week of November 18th. During their meetings, teachers reviewed various items with parents including the FCPS Report Card and current student MAP scores and projected growth as we move into the Winter and Spring.  A special thank you to all of our translators that assisted with conferences this week.  With approximately 400 separate conferences needing translation, their assistance made it possible for our community to access these very important meetings.

 

SMBCCS California State Preschool Program (CSPP) and Grant Application

Earlier this year, Santa Monica was contacted by LAUSD's Early Childhood Education department and informed that 2019-2020 will be the final year the District will contract with Santa Monica to run a California State Preschool Program (CSPP) on our campus.  The District's decision offers our school an opportunity to create our own program model that allows for greater levels of collaboration from Pre-K through 6th grade and more customized and differentiated services to our families.

 

The Fenton schools have partnered with Grants Republic to apply for CSPP funding for programming in the 2020-2021 school year.  225,000,000 in funding is available statewide.  Per the CDE, priority will be given to agencies serving the highest percentage of 4-year old children in underserved areas as identified by the Local Child Care and Development Planning Council (LPC) with highest passing scores awarded first.  The schools are in the final stages of completing our application due by December 10, 2019.  Award notifications are expected on March 31, 2020.

 

Paramount Halloween Screening and Halloween Parade

Santa Monica continued its annual tradition of visiting Paramount Studios for a private movie screening in their state of the art theatre.  All students had an opportunity to attend the screening of Dora the Explorer and The Lost City of Gold.  In between showings, the school community joined students and staff for our Halloween Parade.  Thank you to all staff members that made the day’s festivities possible.

 

Red Ribbon Week

The week of October 21-25 was National Red Ribbon Week.   We celebrated Red Ribbon Week in honor of being bully and drug free.  Each day featured a different activity for students:

 

Monday (10/21) Wear Red: We wear Red to Show We Are Drug and Bully Free

Tuesday (10/22) Crazy Hair and Socks - From Head to Toe We Are Drug and Bully Free 

Wednesday (10/23) Backwards Shirts: We Turn Our Backs to Drugs and Bullying

Thursday (10/24) Sports Team Jersey: We Team Up Against Drugs and Bullying

Friday (10/25) Bright Clothes and Sunglasses:  Our Future is Bright When We Are Drug and Bully Free

 

Thank you to Carina Adra, our School Counselor, for facilitating this day and for creating and disbursing our Red Ribbon Week video that featured several of our students.

 

Dia de los Muertos Parking Fundraiser

Santa Monica held its annual Dia de los Muertos Fundraiser in support of the festivities held at the Hollywood Forever cemetery.  For this fundraiser, Santa Monica partners with the cemetery to allow employees parking on our main yard throughout the morning, and event attendees parking in our lot throughout the evening and into the night.  This fundraiser is typically our largest of the year, this year raising over $5,000.

 

FACILITIES

 

LED Lighting Retrofitting for All Interior and Exterior Lights

Approved at our October 24, 2019 Board Meeting, the LED installation at Santa Monica began on Monday, November 18th and was completed over the Thanksgiving break.  The installation took place during Parent Conference Week beginning at 4:00pm to not disturb instruction.

 

AC Unit Installation in the Bungalows

Approved at our October 24, 2019 Board Meeting, the installation of six wall mounted heat pumps systems and six programmable, networking, smart thermostats are scheduled to take place over the Winter Vacation.

 

Renovation of Ceiling Tiles in Rooms 26, 27, and the J-Building

Santa Monica has proactively met with our Complex Project Manager, Maria Thorpe to discuss renovating the ceiling tiles in Rooms 26, 27, and the J-Building.  The tiles are old and in poor condition and need to be replaced.  An LAUSD team is working on scoping the project and will do some testing in the coming weeks to determine next steps. 

 

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power - Street Pole Survey

Santa Monica has proactively met with our Complex Project Manager, Maria Thorpe to discuss concerns about the structural integrity of street poles on and around the perimeter of the campus as well as low hanging low-voltage wires along Van Ness Avenue.  Ms. Thorpe has communicated this concern with the LADWP and will inform us of next steps.

 

Upcoming Events: 

    • ïSTEAM Symposium, December 9th - 10th 
    • ïComputer Science Education Week, December 9th - December 15th 
    • ïFamily Code Night, December 11th 
    • ïWASC Planning Day (Minimum Day), December 13th
    • ïSMBCCS Winter Performances, December 17th - 18th 
    • ïSchool Site Council Meeting #2, December 19th 
    • ïSMBCCS Staff Holiday Breakfast, December 19th 
    • ïStudent Winter Vacation, December 23rd - January 13th 
    • ïFCPS Professional Development Day #5, January 13th 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.3.

FENTON PRIMARY CENTER (FPC)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

The mission of the Fenton Primary Center is to cultivate a love of learning by fostering an environment that promotes self-discovery, independence and an awareness of the connectedness between self and others.

 

State Charter Number:  911

 

General Information on Enrollment and Attendance:

 

Fenton Primary Center Enrollment as of October 18, 2019 (TK-2):

Transitional Kindergarten

Kindergarten

1st Grade

2nd Grade

Total

40

221

203

230

694

 

Actual Daily Attendance for the Month of November (ADA) = 97.5% (One Year Ago= 97.9%)

Actual Daily Attendance (ADA) Cumulative 2019-2020 = 98.2% (One Year Ago= 98.2%)

 

We increased our enrollment from 688 to 694 in the past month. One year ago our enrollment was 702.

 

Parent Conferences: The first trimester reporting period ended with parent conferences the week of November 18, 2019. Parents participated in one-to-one conferences with their child’s teacher. Teachers communicated each child’s academic strengths and needs. Teachers also shared important information about grade level standards and provided a variety of ways for children to continue academic success at their grade level and beyond. Parents appreciate this time to discuss their child’s progress with the teacher. 

 

Learning Walks: FPC completed the first semester Learning Walks the week of October 21st. These 5-minute walkthroughs provided all teachers an opportunity to observe and gather information from each other. Each teacher visited at least five classrooms. During the visits teachers observed various teaching strategies, class settings, and management skills. The Learning Walks were very successful. FPC will continue with the second semester walks in early spring 2020.  

 

Intervention: The FPC Intervention Lab is working on its second cycle of pull-out intervention. The students who are participating in cycle two were referred by the Coordination of Services Team (COST) during first and second grade meetings held October 21st through November 1st. The emphases of cycle two will be to build the foundational skills of reading to create fluent readers. 

 

Mara Shinn Smith has done a great job of setting up the school’s intervention program focusing on tier 1, 2, and 3 over the past four years. Sadly, Mrs. Shinn Smith will be leaving FPC. She has accepted a position at the Los Angeles County of Education. She has taught FPC teachers and staff much about intervention and the need to focus on foundational skills in the primary grades. The school will be losing a valuable person with a wealth of knowledge in the area of reading intervention. FPC will begin the process of seeking a replacement to continue the implementation of intervention support in and outside of the classroom. 

 

FPC has also been working in grade levels to create in-class intervention by differentiating instruction using data acquired from curriculum assessments and basic phonics skills assessments. The grade levels are using the Professional Learning Community process to develop grade level goals for each of the students. A multi-tiered system of support in reading is being implemented at each grade level for at least 60 minutes a week to prepare students to achieve their goals. The students are leveled twice a week for 30 minutes to focus on these goals. Specific lessons are reviewed by the entire grade level and implemented by specific teachers.     

 

Literacy Day/National Mutt Day: On December 2nd Fenton Primary Center is planning a Literacy Day and celebration of National Mutt Day. The event will provide literacy awareness through various projects combined with mutt dog awareness. There will be special participants from Reading is Fundamental that will read to the children and help distribute a free book to every child. One special activity will be the grade level specific assembly with an author and an FPC chorus performance. There will also be five special guests with their therapy dogs reading in classrooms. The special guests and dogs come from various agencies including BARK Dogs and Guide Dogs of America. FPC would like to thank Nina Ferman and Coco Salazar for spending weeks preparing for this special day. 

 

Animals and Learning: FPC continues to include animals, specifically dogs, as often as possible to teach social studies and build social and emotional skills in young children. The school continues to have visits from Fiona “FPC Therapy Dog”. Guest from local shelters and humane presentations are given throughout the year. The school and Mutt-i-grees lead, Nina Ferman, are finding ways for Fenton Primary Center to continue its success in implementing the Mutt-i-grees curriculum and finding unique ways of implementing additional social emotional learning activities and lessons.

 

 

 

Upcoming Events: 

12/13Chorus Winter Performance (8:30 a.m.)

12/19 School Site Council Meeting

12/20 FPC Staff Holiday Breakfast (6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.)

12/23/19 – 1/13/20 Students on Winter Break

1/20/20 Martin Luther King Jr. Observance – No School

1/30/20 FCPS Board Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.4.

FENTON STEM ACADEMY (STEM)  

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

The mission of the Fenton STEM Academy: Elementary Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math is successful student engagement and achievement through the implementation of a curriculum that interconnects science, technology, engineering, and math across all disciplines, including art, music, language arts and social studies.  

 

State Charter Number:  1605

 

Enrollment 

 

 

TK/Kinder

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

12/05/2019

64

61

47

49

42

49

312

97.52%

97.82%

 

Material Revision to Charter Petition Approved on Consent

 

On November 19, 2019, the Los Angeles Unified School District Board unanimously voted on consent to approve 6th grade at the Fenton Academies beginning August 2020. This decision was made based on the school’s proven track record of strong student academic achievement, positive school culture, fiscally sound operations, and strong parent demand for expansion, as well as the longstanding positive reputation of Fenton Charter Public Schools. Thank you to all that made this request possible, including the FCLA/STEM staff, FCPS Leadership and FCPS Board of Directors. We look forward to year-long planning and preparation for the addition of 6th grade to our student body. 

 

Instruction

 

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Conference: Fenton STEM Academy was fortunate to attend the annual National Science Teachers Association Conference held in Cincinnati, Ohio on November 14 - 16th, 2019. The team included Elisa Vallejo, Kelley Christenson, Cecilia Quijano, Dominica Yasuda, and Julie Nguyen. This year the conference centered on three themes: Bridging the Three Dimensions of Science Teaching and Learning, Constructing Bridges: Building Lifelong Appreciation and Passion for Science, and Building Strong Bridges: Reinforcing the Connection Between Science and Literacy. In addition, all attendees found the keynote speaker and National Geographic Explorer, Luke Dollar, to be inspiring in his efforts to bridge nature with education.  This conference was highly engaging and relevant to our vision of integrating science with core subjects. Knowledge and materials gained through this conference will be shared with staff at the December 11th staff meeting. 

 

Grade Level STEM Challenges: In an effort to continue STEM integrated learning with other subject matter, all grade levels at Fenton STEM Academy participate in monthly STEM Challenges. These challenges are often aligned with current ELA/Benchmark or My Math lessons and are showcased each week in the weekly newsletter. Students are instructed to follow the 5E model, which includes Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate, as well as the Engineering Design Process. This monthly challenge differs from the yearly STEAM Schoolwide Challenge, as grade levels are given freedom to choose a STEM challenge that corresponds with grade level lessons and pacing. Recent challenges include the following:

 

Kindergarten – In kindergarten, the utilization of tools like wooden blocks provide limitless opportunities for STEM exploration. Consistent and frequent block stations allow students to use their creativity and imagination to construct various structures. These structures include castles, slides, homes, bridges and more. With each opportunity, the students challenge themselves to build bigger, taller, and sturdier structures. Throughout this time, the students are learning how to work together, problem solve, and communicate with one another by sharing ideas, opinions, and resources. The students are also building trust and friendship with their peers. These students have begun to sprout a genuine love for STEM. They are building a strong, solid foundation and are excited for more STEM challenges that come their way.

 

First Grade – The first grade students are continuing their unit of study on plants and beginning to curate their “Museum of Leafology”. The first room in the museum is The Plant Parts Room. This room addresses the driving question, “How do plants use their parts to grow and survive?” In groups, students used mixed media materials to create a model of a plant including each plant part. Individually students used modeling clay to make a model of their favorite plant part. Students will work on the addition of The Seeds Room in the coming weeks.  

 

Second Grade – In a recent second grade lesson, students were tasked with a challenge to help Farmer Joe build the tallest tower possible so he can oversee his garden, and scare away any animals that want to eat his crops.  The only problem is that he only has wood planks, and pumpkins to build his structure. Students worked in groups of four.  Each student was given 20 candy pumpkins and toothpicks to build their tower.  The students collaborated to design their blueprint first, then they created their towers, and tested them to make sure they were secure.  Finally, students evaluated their design, and were tasked with the questions regarding if there were any problems with their design, and how they could make it better.  They communicated with their group about redesigning their structure, and making another blueprint with their redesign.  Students enjoyed this challenge, and the collaboration that went with it.  

 

Third Grade – Not all pets like the rain, so third grade students were challenged to design an umbrella for their favorite pet. They worked together as teams of scientists and engineers, researching ideas, investigating solutions, and improving their designs. Teams observed six different materials and tested them for waterproofness. Then teams shared observations of the materials they tested, optionally revised their pet umbrella designs, and chose the materials for each part of their pet umbrella. Students concluded their pet umbrella project by making a poster showcasing the final design of their umbrella and explaining the materials chosen for each part. Third graders had a great time becoming scientists and successfully working together in teams working through the steps of the design process.

 

Fourth Grade – The fourth grade students have been busy learning about energy. Recently, the fourth grade students had an opportunity to participate in the energy transfer process. By using their bodies, students transferred their energy to: yo-yo’s, toy cars and ramps, and tambourines. After the activity, students had to work collaboratively to determine what evidence of energy transference was present. Ultimately, students discovered that energy transfer can be observed as: heat, light, sound, or motion. Our fourth graders will expand upon this learning by working in teams to design a safe, fast, and sturdy car.

 

Fifth Grade – Our fantastic fifth graders put on not only their science goggles, but also their chefs’ hats, as they cooked up their own banana bread. In a recent unit, scholars were looking to answer: What causes substances to change? What better way to investigate this than through food! They observed the properties of the banana bread recipe before and after baking. They also carefully measured and recorded the weights of the ingredients before and after combining the ingredients and before and after baking. At the end, students reflected on what could have happened to cause the changes and wrote down their observations in their interactive science notebooks. Science and food are definitely a recipe for success!

 

Frequent and engaging STEM infused lessons drive the instructional program at Fenton STEM Academy. We will continue to build upon these effective and innovative practices. 

 

Twig Science Curriculum Refresher: On January 17, 2020, the Fenton Academies teaching staff will participate in a two-hour workshop dedicated to the implementation of our new Twig science curriculum. Staff will provide feedback to the Twig trainer and have opportunities to ask questions and further explore this unique and highly rigorous science program. 

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments are scheduled for January 21st – February 7th.  The assessment window is particularly critical, as its data will be used to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment period and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. In an effort to prepare students for the May SBAC Summative Assessment, teachers will analyze student scores to strategically assign intervention groups and adjust and differentiate instructional pacing per student need.  Teachers and administration will discuss data during Mid-Year Goal Setting Conferences set to take place February 18th – 21st. Using mid-year data is an effective and strategic way for mid-course correction in order to meet achievement targets. 

 

Personnel

 

Second Semester Formal Observation Lessons:  Second semester formal observation lessons will begin for probationary certificated staff members January 21st – March 13th. Educators will participate in a pre-observation and post-observation meeting to discuss instructional goals and reflect on lesson outcomes. Second semester lessons will focus on Explicit Direct Instruction to deliver Mathematics lessons that meet California Common Core standards.

 

Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings: As practiced in year’s past, all STEM teachers in grades TK-5 will participate in mid-year goal setting meetings. These meetings are a follow up to the goal setting meetings that were held in the beginning of the year. Mid-year meetings will analyze data collected from the winter MAP testing administration. This review of data will allow teachers to target instruction in an effort to best prepare students for the spring CAASPP testing, as well as provide intervention and enrichment. Mid-year goal setting meetings will take place February 18th – 21st.

School Community

 

The Great Kindness Challenge Week: The Great Kindness Challenge Week will take place January 21st – 24th. This weeklong event is dedicated to promoting a culture of kindness and compassion across our school community. Last year, over 24,000 schools participated in over 90 countries, equaling over 13 million students which resulted in over 650 million acts of kindness! During Kindness Week, students will participate in classroom lessons and activities centered on kindness. 

 

Semester Award Assemblies: Fenton STEM Academy parents will be invited to attend Semester Award Assemblies January 27th – 31st. Awards will be given to students that have demonstrated achievement in overall Academics, Improvement, Citizenship, STEM or Leadership, and Attendance. 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

    • ïDecember 23 – January 10 – Winter Break
    • ïJanuary 13 – FCPS PD Day #5
    • ïJanuary 14 – Students return from break
    • ïJanuary 17 – Spirit Day #5 & Twig Refresher 
    • ïJanuary 20 – MLK Holiday 
    • ïJanuary 21 – Feb. 7 – NWEA MAP Winter Testing
    • ïJanuary 27 – 31 – Semester Awards Assemblies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.D.5.

FENTON CHARTER LEADERSHIP ACADEMY (FCLA)

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

The mission of the Fenton Academy for Social and Emotional Learning is to nurture the development of responsible, thoughtful citizens in an increasingly interdependent global society by creating environments in which students are challenged to explore, to create, to make decisions while actively participating in and being accountable for their learning.  

 

State Charter Number:  1613

 

Enrollment 

 

 

TK/Kinder

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

Total

Monthly

ADA

Cumulative

ADA

12/05/2019

46

54

64

61

59

41

325

97.49%

97.82%

 

Material Revision to Charter Petition Approved

 

On November 19, 2019, the Los Angeles Unified School District Board unanimously voted on consent to approve 6th grade at the Fenton Academies beginning August 2020. This decision was made based on the school’s proven track record of strong student academic achievement, positive school culture, fiscally sound operations, and strong parent demand for expansion, as well as the longstanding positive reputation of Fenton Charter Public Schools. Thank you to all that made this request possible, including the FCLA/STEM staff, FCPS Leadership and FCPS Board of Directors. We look forward to year-long planning and preparation for the addition of 6th grade to our student body. 

 

Instruction

 

Grade Level Leadership Integration: In an effort to integrate Leadership development and Social Emotional Intelligence with other subject matter, all grade levels at Fenton Charter Leadership Academy participate in monthly Leadership Lessons. These lessons are often aligned with current ELA/Benchmark or My Math lessons and are showcased each week in the weekly newsletter. Students incorporate Responsive Classroom, Mutt-i-grees®, or Leadership based units into daily lessons. Recent lessons include the following:

 

TK/Kindergarten – In TK/kindergarten, students have been learning all about themselves and others through the social-emotional curriculum, Mutt-i-grees®. One way students build connections and awareness is through the Budd-i-grees program. TK/kindergarten students have been paired with a fifth grade buddy, and students had their first meeting last month. The TK/kindergartners met with their buddy, drew portraits of one another, and completed a brief interview. This builds upon a previous lesson about the definition of a Mutt-i-gree®. Students learned that a Mutt-i-gree® is a special kind of dog, one that is often a mixture of many different breeds. Through our Mutt-i-grees® curriculum, students are learning about traits that make them unique, just like a Mutt-i-gree®. TK/kindergarteners shared what is special about them with their classmates, and then created self-portraits to display their individuality. Teaching students to identify and accept each other’s differences encourages empathy and creates a culture of acceptance – a key component to creating leaders. 

First Grade – First grade students have been studying how to be a good citizen through their social studies curriculum. During this unit of study students are learning how they can be respectful, responsible, and safe while at school Now, the first graders are ready to extend that knowledge to their first grade service learning projects. Service learning projects give the students the opportunity to apply the skills that they are learning though our leadership program to help innovate solutions that benefit others. This year first grade will emphasize the environment and how we can make changes and find solutions within our very own school. 

 

Second GradeThe second grade students at FCLA have been developing leadership qualities and building community within the classroom through an important daily practice. Every day begins with a Morning Meeting. During this time, students take time to greet one another, learn about the academic focus of the day, and share with each other. Morning Meeting sets students up for academic and social success. This daily check-in develops students’ speaking and listening skills, confidence, cooperation and empathy, while also creating a respectful learning environment. The skills learned in Morning Meeting will be very useful to students as they begin brainstorming and collaborating with their peers for the Service Learning Project they will complete this school year. Second grade has been assigned the domain of animals and will soon begin preparing for the pre-service phase of the Service Learning Cycle

 

Third GradeThe third grade students started the new school year off with learning and reflecting about the “power of yet.” Every new school year can begin with its own set of challenges but the third grade teachers wanted to make sure their students were ready to face mistakes and challenges head on with a “paws”-itive perspective! Students were able to think of activities or skills they are not good at yet and have an idea of how they can possibly get better at it in the days to come. Now when challenges come third grade’s way, the FCLA third graders are ready to face these challenges with a growth mindset. Understanding that learning is a process and failure is part of the journey, builds stamina and humility among our students – key character traits for tomorrow’s leaders. 

 

Fourth Grade – The fourth grade students have been busy discussing and brainstorming ideas for each student’s Service Learning Project for the 2019-2020 school year. These projects are meant to help our students develop 21st century learning skills including communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking skills. Students have been reading articles on how other children their age have been impacting their communities. These different articles have been encouraging students to know that they can make a difference.  As the students prepare to bring their Service Learning Project to fruition, they have been looking at these articles closely to see how other young people have become leaders in their own communities. We can’t wait to see how our students will bring awareness and impact others this year.

 

Fifth GradeThe fifth grade students started the year off by exploring and defining their most notable traits and sharing it with their classmates. This exercise gives the students an opportunity to learn about themselves, learn about their classmates, and, most importantly, create an opportunity for the students to interact with one another. This community building exercise shows the students that although every student is different, everyone provides something unique and equally valuable. The exercise began with a simple morning meeting in which students expressed which traits they most admired. They then reflected upon themselves and selected traits that they believed best suited them. Then the class was asked to create a self-portrait of themselves. This self-portrait worked as a visual aid for the students to really express how they see themselves. Part of being a great leader is understanding your own traits and the traits of your team!

 

Frequent and engaging Leadership/Social Emotional Intelligence lessons drive the instructional program at Fenton Charter Leadership Academy. We will continue to build upon these effective and innovative practices. 

Twig Science Curriculum Refresher: On January 17, 2020, the Fenton Academies teaching staff will participate in a two-hour workshop dedicated to the implementation of our new Twig science curriculum. Staff will provide feedback to the Twig trainer and have opportunities to ask questions and further explore this unique and highly rigorous science program. 

 

Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments: Mid-Year NWEA MAP Assessments are scheduled for January 21st – February 7th.  The assessment window is particularly critical, as its data will be used to compare student growth from the beginning of the year assessment period and guide instruction for the remainder of the year. In an effort to prepare students for the May SBAC Summative Assessment, teachers will analyze student scores to strategically assign intervention groups and adjust and differentiate instructional pacing per student need.  Teachers and administration will discuss data during Mid-Year Goal Setting Conferences set to take place February 18th – 21st. Using mid-year data is an effective and strategic way for mid-course correction in order to meet achievement targets. 

 

Personnel

 

Second Semester Formal Observation Lessons:  Second semester formal observation lessons will begin for probationary certificated staff members January 21st – March 13th. Educators will participate in a pre-observation and post-observation meeting to discuss instructional goals and reflect on lesson outcomes. Second semester lessons will focus on Explicit Direct Instruction to deliver Mathematics lessons that meet California Common Core standards. 

 

Mid-Year Goal Setting Meetings: As practiced in year’s past, all FCLA teachers in grades TK-5 will participate in mid-year goal setting meetings. These meetings are a follow up to the goal setting meetings that were held in the beginning of the year. Mid-year meetings will analyze data collected from the winter MAP testing administration. This review of data will allow teachers to target instruction in an effort to best prepare students for the spring CAASPP testing, as well as provide intervention and enrichment. Mid-year goal setting meetings will take place February 18th – 21st.

 

School Community

 

The Great Kindness Challenge Week: The Great Kindness Challenge Week will take place January 21st – 24th. This weeklong event is dedicated to promoting a culture of kindness and compassion across our school community. Last year, over 24,000 schools participated in over 90 countries, equaling over 13 million students which resulted in over 650 million acts of kindness! During Kindness Week, students will participate in classroom lessons and activities centered on kindness.

 

Semester Award Assemblies: Fenton Charter Leadership Academy parents will be invited to attend Semester Award Assemblies January 27th – 31st. Awards will be given to students that have demonstrated achievement in overall Academics, Improvement, Citizenship, STEM or Leadership, and Attendance. 

 

Upcoming Events: 

 

    • ïDecember 23 – January 10 – Winter Break
    • ïJanuary 13 – FCPS PD Day #5
    • ïJanuary 14 – Students return from break
    • ïJanuary 17 – Spirit Day #5 & Twig Refresher 
    • ïJanuary 20 – MLK Holiday 
    • ïJanuary 21 – Feb. 7 – NWEA MAP Winter Testing
    • ïJanuary 27 – 31 – Semester Awards Assemblies 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. E.

 

Chief Academic Officer’s Report and LCAP Update

(See presentation slides)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. F.

 

Executive Director’s Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item II.F.

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS (FCPS)

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT

 

December 5, 2019

 

The mission of the Fenton Charter Public Schools is to offer a high quality innovative education to all students in a safe, secure, nurturing environment where students, parents and staff become a community of learners achieving collaborative and successful outcomes. 

 

CCSA:

 

From President and CEO Myrna Castrejón - 

Dear Friends,

On October 29, 2019, the CCSA Board of Directors approved a new organizational strategic plan. Our strategy emerges from a close examination of our core competencies, is aligned with our members’ needs, and is anchored to our unwavering kids-first orientation.

Over the last decade and a half, you have defied expectations, consistently proving that gaps in achievement and opportunity can be closed and our schools can be transformative places for hundreds of thousands of kids. Study after study proves that California’s non-profit charter schools are an indispensable part of the public education system and collectively we serve an important public interest in closing persistent achievement gaps. Our state’s most vulnerable students today learn more, achieve more, and are better prepared for college and career because of charter schools.

Successful organizations commit to constant improvement and clear-eyed strategic visioning based on need and opportunity. We have realigned our organization to focus on a geographic—rather than functional—design and reorganized teams so that we can double down on our core competencies of:

    • Local and Statewide Advocacy
    • Politics
    • Communications

In the coming weeks and months, we will strengthen how we organize our work in serving members by:

    • Streamlining direct individual supports and improving member response.
    • Increasing investments in advocacy communications.
    • Advancing quality on behalf of the sector. 
    • Aligning and strengthening local and statewide advocacy efforts.
    • Recommitting to work in coalitions that strengthen local reform ecosystems where ‘great schools for all’ can thrive.

In the coming weeks and months, we will also share more information about the practical implications of our new strategic plan. If you have questions in the meantime, please direct them to communications@ccsa.org.  

 Working together, we are positioned to succeed in a new era as a strong, vibrant charter school sector that consistently delivers for California’s kids. 2020 is guaranteed to be another big year for us and the public school kids we serve. I look forward to conquering it together.

Adelante!

Myrna Castrejón, President and CEO

 

Note:  This newly approved strategic plan has resulted in some staff changes at CCSA, including the Los Angeles office.

 

 

 

 

 

State:

 

From School Services of California –

 

“Short Outline of California School Finance History Based on the Recollections of Ken Hall”

[Note from John Gray: From time to time it is good to take a break and seek counsel and wisdom from those who were the trailblazers in your chosen profession. About once a quarter I have lunch with those trailblazers to tap into that wisdom. For me, that means having lunch with Ken Hall, School Services of California Inc. (SSC) Founder; Davis Campbell, former Executive Director of the California School Boards Association and Chair of the University of California, Davis, School of Education and a bunch of other stuff that he says is impressive; and Kelvin Lee, former Superintendent of Dry Creek Elementary School District for 30+ years. Since I am the one who always pays, and because they are doing me the favor, Ken orders a really expensive glass of wine, Davis orders an expensive beer I have never heard of, while Kelvin and I have water or iced tea. 

At our recent lunch, we talked about all of the many events that shaped California school finance. It was a great conversation, as I heard their firsthand knowledge from when they were trailblazing and I was in junior high school. I asked Ken if he would put pen to paper so I could share that wealth of information with our readers. The following is a guest article from Ken Hall, founder of SSC. Oh yes, Davis would want me to tell you he is also the author of “The Governance Core,” which is on the SSC best seller’s list.]

1971: California Supreme Court (Court) concludes the Serrano v. Priest lawsuit and finds the California school finance system to be unconstitutional. The Court orders differentials in education funding per average daily attendance (ADA) must be reduced to “insignificant” differences. The Court remands the case back to lower court.

1972: Senate Bill (SB) 90 (1406/1972), the Reagan Moretti Property Tax Relief Act, is adopted in December 1972. The bill provides state funding for major property tax rollback, including schools; eliminates numerous “permissive overrides”; adds major funding for equalization of school funding; establishes school revenue limits with differential amounts per ADA going forward based on a district’s 1972–73 funding level; adopts first Urban Impact Aid for school districts; adopts a requirement that the state must fund mandated program costs; implements modest property tax controls on county governments; and increases state income and sales taxes.

1973–74: Los Angeles Superior Court rules SB 90 was insufficient in meeting the Supreme Court standards of equalization; appeals begin. The appeals uphold the Court; the state is given six years to address the obligations of the Serrano v. Priest decision.

1975: Governor Jerry Brown takes office.

1976–77: Legislature adopts Assembly Bill (AB) 65, which provides for added major school equalization; establishment of “gyp” tax for obligation of high property tax districts to fund tax increases in low property tax districts; and numerous provisions to respond to the Serrano v. Priest decision.

Winter–Spring, 1978: Assessors around the state, but especially in Los Angeles, reassess residential properties and issue tax bills with major increases in local property taxes—tax payers scream. Howard Jarvis and Paul Gann launch the Proposition 13 campaign for a huge rollback in property tax rates and for controls on future assessed increases. As it becomes clear that Proposition 13 is going to pass, Governor Brown becomes a “born again tax cutter.” The former Assembly Speaker and current State Treasurer Jesse Unruh claims that the state has an “obscene” surplus and huge reserves.

June 1978: Proposition 13 is adopted by the electorate. The immediate result was $4–5 billion in property tax income being lost; new local special taxes requiring two-thirds vote; the repeal of the option for local agencies to seek electorate approval of local taxes to pay for capital bonds; the assessed value on all properties to remain at the 1975 level, except for cost-of-living increase of no more than 2%; and all local governments, including schools, lose billions in local income as the total local tax rate is capped at 1%. Governor Brown calls a special session to address the state’s response.

Summer 1978: The Emergency Conference Committee of the state Legislature designs a state “bailout” with state support for local governments at reduced levels. Schools become very dependent on the State for future funding as property taxes decline to a lower percentage of total funding—the provisions of AB 65 and most other funding systems for education are repealed, but revenue limits continue as the primary mechanism for funding schools. Legislature adopts the bailout. Schools suffer losses of 9% to 15% in revenues based on their income level. Funding loss is, however, moderated by the 9% to 15% because it is based on the anticipated 1978–79 State Budget growth prior to Proposition 13.

1979: The Legislature considers and the Governor signs AB 8—which provides a funding system for local governments and schools going forward. It lets school districts keep previously electorate-adopted tax increases; and therefore, provides funding for schools at differential levels to equalize funding levels. It concludes that the distribution of the 1% local property tax revenues will be based on proportional property tax allocation in 1977–78.

1981–82: Governor Brown provides, in his January State Budget, a 6% cost-of-living increase for schools. However, due to a state recession and the loss in state income, Brown rescinds the cost-of-living increase in his May Revision. For the first time in recent state history, schools will have no cost-of-living increase per ADA in 1982–83 State Budget. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Wilson Riles pleads for a cost-of-living adjustment restoration to no avail.

1981–82: San Jose Unified School District (USD) suffers a strike by their teachers and goes to factfinding to settle the salary dispute. The factfinding chair, with the support of the California Teachers Association (CTA) representative, recommends a 9% salary increase and the school board accepts the factfinding report and adopts a 9% salary increase—based, in part, on the 6% revenue limit increase in state funding. With the rescission of the cost-of-living increase in the State Budget, San Jose USD claims bankruptcy and for the first time in state history, a federal bankruptcy judge accepts jurisdiction. After a celebrated hearing, the judge orders the salary increase to be rescinded. The CTA appeals this decision but loses in court, so salaries are rolled back and it takes until 1985 for the district to be able to fund any salary increases.

1982 Campaign: George Deukmejian defeats Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley to become governor, based primarily on a law and order campaign. Bill Honig becomes state superintendent of public instruction. Senator Deukmejian makes modest campaign commitments to help schools after the zero cost of living. Superintendent Honig launches a ‘save California schools’ campaign, which attracts hundreds and so he continues the campaign into 1983. His campaign leads to the development of a conference committee of the state Legislature to address school funding and reform.

1983: The Legislature adopts and the Governor signs SB 813—which included major added school equalization; establishment of longer day (minute controls by grade level for minimum education delivery); longer year requirements (180 days up from 175); and added categorical programs for support and control of schools. The bill is hailed as a savior for K–12 education.

1983–84: A Superior Court rules that California has satisfied the obligations of Serrano v. Priest and funding has been reduced to insignificant differentials. Court of Appeals upholds the decision and the Supreme Court refuses to hear an appeal.

1987: Governor Deukmejian and Assembly Speaker Willie Brown are unable to reach a compromise on the return of state surpluses to tax payers. Governor Deukmejian prevails and returns $1.2 billion to California income tax payers; however, schools claim the state surplus should have been returned to school agencies and other needy local agencies.

November 1988: State elections focus on forty-one state propositions on the ballot, including nine bond acts for higher education, K–12 districts, water, homeless, and others. The proposition campaigns focus on other issues and Proposition 98, which provides three tests for school funding in the State Budget, is adopted with only a small margin of victory. 

1990: U.S. Senator Pete Wilson is elected as governor over Mayor Diane Feinstein. The governor commits and tries to focus state funding for schools to early childhood issues. However, major earthquakes and fires plague his Administration, and school funding remains a legal and political debate over the state obligations of Proposition 98.

1991: Senator Gary Hart proposes and the Governor signs legislation to authorize one hundred charter schools, which are destined to be a major reform in K–12 governance and delivery. The cap of one hundred schools is later eclipsed with hundreds of schools adopting the charter school opportunities for education delivery without the many cumbersome hurdles of state law.

1991–92: Richmond USD attempts to close its doors in April due to lack of funds. The district claims that it cannot keep the doors open and sends all students and teachers home. The lack of funds is in large part due to school board adoption of a district budget that assumes one thousand students from surrounding school districts will enroll at Richmond USD, due to its amazing educational program. The local superintendent, who later goes to jail for Workers’ Compensation fraud, sells the local agency and the Administration of President George Bush on the idea that the district is providing an amazing education that will attract students from throughout the North Bay area.

1992: State Supreme Court rules (Butt v. State of California) that Richmond USD cannot close its doors and the state of California is responsible for local education, which is a fundamental right. State provides a loan to Richmond USD to cover the costs for the rest of the year and to pay debt which has accumulated, including $18 million dollars—of the total $60 million loan—owed to IBM for computers that are never used. The state appoints a state administrator to run the district while also ensuring the loan is repaid. Future students lose funding based on the errors and extravagant expenditure of the school board.

1992: The state Legislature adopts numerous provisions to control local school district budgets. This includes an obligation for county offices of education (COEs) to approve district budgets and also requires that districts have a positive multiyear finance balance. It also establishes the Fiscal Crises Management Assistance Team (FCMAT), funded by the state to assist in school district budget supervision—Kern COE wins a competitive bid to manage and house FCMAT. Numerous measurements are included in state supervision of budgets, including an obligation for local agencies to have a reserve—as determined by the California Department of Education and the authority of the state—to appoint a state administrator for districts that are insolvent and/or a fiscal advisor in the case of districts facing potential fiscal insolvency.

1995: A major unexpected state surplus is sought by schools for major increases in funding. The CTA claims the added funding needs to be used to roll back class sizes. Governor Wilson, in a veiled response to CTA, calls for class-size reduction and proposes to use $1.5 billion to roll back class sizes for grades K–3 to twenty students in his May Revision Budget. The provision is adopted in the State Budget with optional implementation to be immediate.

1995–96: Schools reel under the “burden” to immediately roll back class sizes at lower grades, and a few school districts reject the optional provision to roll back to twenty students. Thousands of relocatable classrooms are purchased/leased and thousands of new teachers hired. Academics claim that unless the class size is rolled back to sixteen it might as well be twenty-four in order to be helpful to the delivery of education. Parents and teachers hail the lower class size as a very positive provision. Districts are given a common dollar reimbursement for the program costs of lower class size, but funding does not cover full costs if a district’s prior class size was over approximately twenty-eight to twenty-nine students.

1998: Governor Gray Davis is elected.

1997–2000: Numerous categorical programs are adopted for school districts, and the state adopts major retirement increases for the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) members due to a large state surplus and very positive state budgets going forward. 

2001: The stock market crashes and capital gains income for the state drops dramatically. The state faces major funding shortfalls and therefore funding for schools remains relatively constant until 2006.

October 2003: Governor Davis is recalled and Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger assumes office.

2010–2013: Governor Jerry Brown is elected and provides a dramatic change in school finance. After more than fifty years, revenue limit funding is repealed and replaced by the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) with a delegated ability to the local agency to determine their funding priorities. Numerous categorical programs are repealed and replaced with base funding plus supplemental funds for those districts with high numbers of economically disadvantaged students, English learners, and foster youth. The state decision making for schools shifts to the State Board of Education with the appointment of Sue Burr as board executive secretary and Michael Kirst as board chair by the Governor. The Local Control and Accountability Plan is adopted with the intent to ensure school districts provide increasing levels of educational accomplishment. 

2013–19: Major increases in funding are provided to K–12 schools but the increases in CalSTRS and CalPERS pension payments consume many of the funding increases. The finance goals established in the initial LCFF are met in 2018–19, which is in advance of the adopted schedule.

“Overview of Special Education in California”

In advance of significant 2020–21 State Budget conversations on special education, the Legislative Analyst’s Office released an Overview of Special Education in California. The report provides a high-level review of special education laws, services, outcomes, funding, and costs. As stated in the conclusion, their “intent throughout this report has been to help the Legislature understand [special education] complexity, with the ultimate goal of better positioning the Legislature to engage with the administration in developing cost-effective policy responses for improving special education in California.”

The report makes no specific recommendations for special education but does note some interesting observations that may come into play in the upcoming State Budget conversations:

    • Adjusted for inflation, between 2007–08 and 2017–18, special education expenditures increased 28%—attributing one-third of that increase to staff salaries and the other two-thirds to a rise in incidence of students with relatively severe disabilities
    • During that same time, local unrestricted funding has been covering an increasing share of special education expenditures, rising from 49% in 2007–08 to 61% in 2017–18 
    • The average annual cost of educating a student with disabilities (SWD) is now $26,000 (compared to $9,000 for a student without disabilities) and that cost can range significantly
    • The prevalence of students with relatively severe disabilities has almost doubled since 2000–01, largely driven by the rise in autism which now affects about 1 in 50 students
    • The majority of SWDs are in mainstream classrooms
    • Compared to other California students, SWDs are disproportionately low income and disproportionately African American
    • The suspension rate of SWDs is almost double the statewide average
    • The average percentile on state tests for SWDs in 2017 was 18th

The 2019–20 State Budget education trailer bill includes a preview of continued special education conversations to come. As a condition of continued funding, Assembly Bill 75 states that the director of finance and the chair and vice chair of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee must notify the state superintendent of public instruction that a 2020–21 budget trailer bill makes statutory changes designed to improve the academic outcomes of individuals with exceptional needs. These statutory changes may include:

    • Expansion of inclusive practices to ensure that every individual with exceptional needs has access to learn in the least restrictive environment
    • Opportunities for local educational agencies to receive state and regional support to address disproportionality of special education identification, placement, and discipline and ensure equitable access to services for individuals with exceptional needs
    • Review of existing funding allocations for special education
    • An examination of the role of Special Education Local Plan Areas in the delivery of special education services and supports for individuals with exceptional needs, including increasing accountability and incorporation into the statewide system of support

As noted above, the Legislature will likely look to this report as a foundational part of the upcoming conversations around special education. 

“SBE Approves Details for the ELPI and Modifications to the ESSA State Plan”

At its November 6, 2019, meeting, the State Board of Education (SBE) approved the methodology and cut scores for the English Learner Progress Indicator (ELPI) and clarified the definitions of ineffective and out-of-field teachers for California’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) State Plan. 

The 2019 California School Dashboard (Dashboard) will be the first year that local educational agencies (LEAs) can be identified for state differentiated assistance and schools can be identified for federal assistance under ESSA based on their performance on the ELPI. For this reason, the SBE had to approve the methodology and cut scores for the ELPI at the November board meeting in order for the indicator to be ready for the December release of the Dashboard.  

The ELPI is unique from the other Dashboard indicators because it is the only indicator required under ESSA to measure progress towards proficiency rather than just proficiency. This means that two years of data are required to determine the Status (current year performance level) for this indicator while three years of data are needed to determine the Status and Change (how performance level compares to prior-year data), both of which are necessary to populate one of the five color-coded performance levels on the Dashboard. 

The SBE approved the methodology and cut scores for the ELPI Status by splitting levels two and three of the English Learner Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC), creating six ELPI levels based on the ELPAC split. The rationale for this split is that it reflects the research-based timeline of five to seven years for an English learner student at level 1 on the ELPAC to reach English language proficiency. 

Since a performance color cannot be populated for the ELPI until the 2020 Dashboard, the SBE also approved using the ELPI Status of “very low” as a proxy for “red,” the lowest color performance on the Dashboard, in order to identify LEAs for state differentiated assistance and schools for federal ESSA assistance (comprehensive support and improvement, targeted support and improvement, and additional targeted support and improvement) using the 2019 Dashboard. 

The SBE also made some modifications to California’s ESSA State Plan at the November meeting. While the SBE members have expressed their displeasure in needing to define ineffective and out-of-field teachers, doing so is required by federal law. For this reason, the SBE approved the California Department of Education’s (CDE’s) recommended clarifying revisions to the definitions of ineffective and out-of-field teachers currently in California’s ESSA State Plan. 

The other change the SBE made to the ESSA State Plan was revising the long-term goal for the extended graduation rate to 90.5%. This was necessary after the SBE adopted a five-year extended graduation rate for the Graduation Rate Indicator at their July meeting.  This means that in order for California to reconcile their state and federal accountability requirements into one system, California’s ESSA State Plan needed to be revised to set the same long-term goal for the extended graduation rate as they did for the Graduation Rate Indicator back in July. The graduation rate changes will be reflected on the 2019 Dashboard when it is released the week of December 9. 

In addition to the action on the ELPI and the ESSA State Plan, the SBE also approved the State Superintendent of Public Instruction’s proposed California Science Test (CAST) threshold scores, to be effective beginning with the 2018–19 administration. 

“Additional New Laws Affecting LEAs in 2020”

While School Services of California Inc. has reported on the final outcomes of many bills, we wanted to bring attention to a few additional new laws. While these new laws may not have a large fiscal impact to local educational agencies (LEAs), they may impose a state mandate, so we think they are important for LEAs to note. With the exception of Senate Bill (SB) 265 (Chapter 785/2019), which took effect immediately upon being signed, all of the new laws listed below will take effect on January 1, 2020.

Assembly Bill (AB) 51 (Chapter 711/2019)—Employment Discrimination: Enforcement. This bill prohibits a person from requiring any employee or applicant for employment, as a condition of employment, continued employment, or the receipt of any employment-related benefit, to waive their right to file for violations of any provision of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act or other specific statutes governing employment. The bill also prohibits an employer from threatening, retaliating, discriminating against, or terminating any employee or applicant for employment because of the refusal to consent to the waiver of their rights. 

AB 189 (Chapter 674/2019)—Child Abuse or Neglect: Mandated Reporters: Autism Service Personnel. This bill adds qualified autism service providers, professionals, and paraprofessionals to the list of individuals who are mandated reporters.

AB 272 (Chapter 42/2019)—Pupils: Use of Smartphones. This bill explicitly authorizes the governing body of a school district, a county office of education (COE), or a charter school to adopt a policy to limit or prohibit the use of smartphones by students while they are at school or under the supervision and control of an employee(s) of the school district, COE, or charter school.

AB 543 (Chapter 428/2019)—Education: Sexual Harassment: Written Policy: Posters. Current law requires each educational institution in the state to have a written policy on sexual harassment and to display that policy in a prominent location in the main administrative building or other area of the educational institution’s campus or school site. The policy must be provided as part of any orientation program conducted for new students at the beginning of each quarter, semester, or summer session, as applicable. This bill requires a copy of the policy also be provided as part of an orientation program conducted for continuing students. 

AB 709 (Chapter 437/2019)—School Districts: Governing Boards: Pupil Members. Current law requires an LEA with one or more high schools to appoint one or more student members to the governing board if students submit a petition to make those appointments. Student members also have the right to attend all meetings of the governing board, except executive sessions, and must be seated with the members of the governing board and be recognized as a full member at the meetings, including receiving all open meeting materials presented to the board members at the same time the materials are presented to the board members. This bill requires a student member to also be appointed to subcommittees of the governing board in the same manner as other board members, be made aware of the time commitment required to participate in subcommittee meetings and work, and authorizes them to decline an appointment to a subcommittee. 

AB 711 (Chapter 179/2019)—Pupil Records: Name and Gender Changes. This bill requires a school district, charter school, or COE to update a former student’s records to include their updated legal name or gender if the school district, charter school, or COE receives government-issued documentation demonstrating that the former student’s legal name or gender has been changed.

AB 947 (Chapter 778/2019)—Visually Impaired Pupils: Expanded Core Curriculum. This bill authorizes school districts, COEs, and charter schools to consider elements of the expanded core curriculum when developing an Individualized Education Program (IEP) for a student who is blind, has low vision, or is visually impaired. If an orientation and mobility evaluation is needed for a student who is blind, has low vision, or is visually impaired, this bill requires that these evaluations be conducted by appropriately certified specialists and occur in familiar and unfamiliar environments; in varying lighting conditions; and in the home, school, and community, as appropriate.

AB 982 (Chapter 779/2019)—Pupils: Homework Assignments for Suspended Pupils. Existing law authorizes the teacher of any class from which a student is suspended to require the suspended student to complete any assignments and tests missed during the suspension. This bill additionally requires a teacher, upon the request of a parent, legal guardian, or other person holding the right to make educational decisions for the student, to provide the homework that would otherwise have been assigned to a student who has been suspended from school for two or more school days. If a homework assignment is turned in upon the student’s return to school from suspension or within the timeframe originally prescribed by the teacher, whichever is later, and it is not graded before the end of the academic term, the assignment will not be included in the calculation of the student’s overall grade in the class.

AB 1127 (Chapter 781/2019)—Interdistrict Attendance: Prohibition on Transfers by a School District of Residence. This bill prohibits a school district of residence from prohibiting the interdistrict transfer of a victim of an act of bullying if there is no available school for an intradistrict transfer and the school district of proposed enrollment approves the application for transfer.

AB 1319 (Chapter 458/2019)—Migrant Education: Pupil Residency. This bill requires LEAs to allow a migratory child to continue attending their school of origin or a school within the school district of origin regardless of any change of residence of the student. 

AB 1354 (Chapter 756/2019)—Juvenile Court School Pupils: Joint Transition Planning Policy: Individualized Transition Plan. This bill requires a COE, as part of the joint transition planning policy, to assign transition oversight responsibilities to existing COE personnel who will work in collaboration with the county probation department, as needed, and relevant LEAs to ensure that specified transition activities are completed for the student. It also requires COE personnel to facilitate the transfer of complete and accurate education records and the student’s IEP when a student enters the juvenile court school.

AB 1595 (Chapter 543/2019)—Elementary and Secondary Education: Omnibus Bill. If a school district or charter school elects to offer any interscholastic athletic program, existing law requires the school district or charter school to acquire at least one automated external defibrillator (AED) for each school within the school district or the charter school. This bill instead requires a school district or charter school offering an interscholastic athletic program to acquire at least one AED for each school that participates in the program within the jurisdiction of the school district or the charter school.

AB 1767 (Chapter 694/2019)—Pupil Suicide Prevention Policies. This bill requires the governing board of an LEA that serves students in kindergarten through grade 6 to adopt and update a policy on pupil suicide prevention that specifically addresses the needs of high-risk groups before the beginning of the 2020–21 school year. The policy must be age appropriate and delivered and discussed in a manner that is sensitive to the needs of young students and must be written to ensure proper coordination and consultation with the county mental health plan for a referral for mental health or related services made on behalf of a student who is a Medi-Cal beneficiary. The bill also requires the policy to address any training on suicide awareness and prevention to be provided to teachers of students in all of the grades served by the LEA.

SB 142 (Chapter 720/2019)—Employees: Lactation Accommodation. Existing law requires employers to provide a reasonable amount of break time to employees desiring to express milk for the employee’s infant child and to make reasonable efforts to provide the employee with the use of a room—or other location, other than a bathroom—in close proximity to the employee’s work area for the employee to express milk in private. Existing law also exempts an employer from the break time requirement if the employer’s operations would be seriously disrupted by providing that time to employees. This bill instead requires an employer to provide a lactation room or location that includes prescribed features and requires an employer to provide access to a sink and refrigerator in close proximity to the employee’s workspace. Denial of reasonable break time or adequate space to express milk will be deemed a failure to provide a rest period in accordance with state law. Employers will be prohibited from discharging, or in any other manner discriminating or retaliating against, an employee for exercising or attempting to exercise rights under these provisions and would establish remedies that include filing a complaint with the Labor Commissioner. Employers with fewer than fifty employees may seek an exemption if the employer demonstrates that the requirement posed an undue hardship by causing the employer significant difficulty or expense, though the employer must make a reasonable effort to provide a place for an employee to express milk in private.

SB 265 (Chapter 785/2019)—Pupil Meals: Child Hunger Prevention and Fair Treatment Act of 2017. The Child Hunger Prevention and Fair Treatment Act of 2017 requires certain LEAs that provide school meals through the federal National School Lunch Program or the federal School Breakfast Program, to ensure that a student whose parent or guardian has unpaid school meal fees is not shamed, treated differently, or served a meal that differs from other students. This bill instead requires those LEAs to ensure that a student whose parent or guardian has unpaid school meal fees is not denied a reimbursable meal of the student’s choice because of the fact that the student’s parent or guardian has unpaid meal fees and to ensure that the pupil is not shamed or treated differently from other pupils. This bill went into effect on October 12, 2019.

“Governor Newsom Signed 75% of Governor Brown’s Vetoed Bills”

Over one month removed from taking his final actions on legislation for the 2019 year, the capitol community continues to analyze Governor Gavin Newsom’s legislative actions in his first year as governor. In particular, many were wondering what Governor Newsom would do with the numerous bills that were vetoed by former Governor Jerry Brown and reintroduced by lawmakers this past year with the hopes that Governor Newsom would sign those measures into law. Research by policy consultants and other capitol insiders has found that there were eighty-eight bills that were vetoed by Governor Brown during his tenure that were reintroduced this past year and made it to Governor Newsom’s desk. Of those eighty-eight bills, Governor Newsom signed sixty-six into law and vetoed the other twenty-two. 

The table below shows the bills with implications for the K–12 system that were vetoed by Governor Brown during his tenure, but signed into law by Governor Newsom in 2019:

2019 Bill Signed by Newsom

2018 Bill Vetoed by Brown

Summary

Assembly Bill (AB) 9
(Reyes, D-San Bernardino)

AB 1870 
(Reyes)

Extends the statute of limitations from one year to three years for all employment-related discrimination, harassment, and retaliation claims filed with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing

AB 51 
(Gonzalez, D-San Diego)

AB 3080 
(Gonzalez)

Prohibits requiring applicants for employment or employees to waive their right to a judicial forum as a condition of employment or continued employment

AB 218 
(Gonzalez)

AB 3120 
(Gonzalez)

Extends the time for commencement of actions for childhood sexual assault to forty years of age or five years from discovery of the injury, provides enhanced damages for a cover up of the assault, and provides a three-year window in which expired claims would be revived

AB 378 
(Limon, D-Santa Barbara)

AB 101 (2011)
(Perez, D-Los Angeles)

Authorizes family child care providers to form, join, and participate in organized representation and to bargain on matters relating to subsidized child care programs

AB 493 
(Gloria, D-San Diego)

AB 2153
(Thurmond, D-Richmond)

Requires the California Department of Education to develop or update resources for in-service training on schoolsite and community resources for the support of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students

AB 1354 
(Gipson, D-Carson)

Senate Bill (SB) 304 (2017)
(Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge)

Requires county offices of education to ensure that a student enrolled in a juvenile court school for more than twenty school days has an individualized transition plan and access to specified educational records upon release

AB 1507 
(Smith, D-Santa Clarita)

SB 739 (2015)
(Pavley, D-Agoura Hills)

Eliminates the authorization for a charter school to be located outside the boundaries of its authorizer

SB 126 
(Leyva, D-Chino)

AB 709 (2015)
(Gipson)

Requires charter school governing boards to comply with a variety of the same open meeting, conflict-of-interest, and disclosure laws as traditional school district governing boards

SB 142 
(Wiener, D-San Francisco)

SB 937
(Wiener)

Imposes new building and employer requirements for ensuring access to adequate lactation space

SB 223 
(Hill, D-San Mateo)

SB 1127 
(Hill)

Authorizes the governing board of a local educational agency (LEA) or charter school to adopt a policy that allows a parent or guardian to administer medicinal cannabis to an authorized pupil at a schoolsite

SB 225 
(Durazo, D-Los Angeles)

SB 174
(Lara, D-Bell Gardens)

Makes any person at least eighteen years of age and a resident of California eligible to hold an appointed civil office, regardless of that person’s citizenship and immigration status

SB 328 
(Portantino)

SB 328 
(Portantino)

Requires the school day for middle schools and high schools, including charter schools, to begin no earlier than 8:00 a.m. and 8:30 a.m., respectively, by July 1, 2022, or the date in which a district’s collective bargaining agreement that is operative on January 1, 2020, expires, whichever is later

SB 419 
(Skinner, D-Berkeley)

SB 607
(Skinner)

Prohibits the suspension of a pupil in grades 4 and 5 for willful defiance and for five years prohibits the suspension of a pupil in grades 6–8

Some of the education bills that were previously vetoed by Governor Brown were also vetoed by Governor Newsom in 2019. The bills that were vetoed by both governors that would have affected the public school system had they been signed are highlighted in the table below: 

2019 Bill Vetoed by Newsom

2018 Bill Vetoed by Brown

Summary

AB 171
(Gonzalez)

AB 3081 
(Gonzalez)

Would have extended anti-retaliation and anti-discrimination protections to survivors of sexual harassment

AB 500 
(Gonzalez)

AB 568 (2017) 
(Gonzalez)

Would have required school districts, charter schools, and community colleges to provide at least six weeks of full pay for pregnancy-related leaves of absence taken by certificated, academic, and classified employees

AB 751 
(O’Donnell, D-Long Beach)

AB 1951 
(O’Donnell)

Would have required the State Superintendent of Public Instruction to approve one or more nationally recognized high school assessments, such as the SAT or ACT, that school districts and charter schools could have used in lieu of the grade 11 state assessment

AB 1212 
(Levine, D-Marin County)

AB 2348 (2016) 
(Levine)

Would have required the Department of Transportation and Department of Water Resources to produce a list of priority infrastructure projects for funding consideration by the California State Teachers’ Retirement System and the California Public Employees’ Retirement System boards

SB 695 
(Portantino)

SB 354 (2017) 
(Portantino)

Would have required an LEA, upon a parent’s request, to translate a pupil’s completed Individualized Education Program (IEP) as well as any evaluation, assessment, or progress data used to determine eligibility or development of an IEP

It is important to note that some of the issues that Governor Newsom has vetoed this year do not necessarily mean that he is against those specific proposals. In fact, he may be willing to use some of those issues as future bargaining chips in budget and policy negotiations with the Legislature, or he may be more inclined to sign certain measures into law a few years from now, particularly if public opinion or the political climate changes on a certain issue. 

“CalPERS Issues Revised Employer Contribution Rate Estimates”

The California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) has just finalized the Schools Pool Actuarial Valuation report, as of June 30, 2018, and has adjusted its estimates for employer contribution rates, as follows:

Year

Prior Employer
Contribution Rate

Current Employer
Contribution Rate*

2019–20

19.721%

19.721%

2020–21

22.70%

22.80%

2021–22

24.60%

24.90%

2022–23

25.40%

25.90%

2023–24

26.10%

26.60%

2024–25

26.30%

27.00%

2025–26

26.20%

26.80%

2026–27

N/A

26.70%

*Actual for 2019–20 and estimated for future years

These rates reflect the application of Senate Bill 90 (Chapter 33/2019), which included a $904 million contribution from the state to reduce the employer contribution levels by 0.9% in 2020–21 and 0.3% in the subsequent years. These updated rates should be used for local agency 2019–20 First Interim reports, if feasible, and will be included in the next version of our SSC Financial Projection Dartboard to be prepared with the 2020–21 Governor’s Budget Proposal in January 2020.

District:

 

The Material Amendment request for the addition of sixth grade to Fenton Charter Leadership Academy and Fenton STEM Academy was reviewed by the Los Angeles Unified School District on Tuesday, November 19th and approved on consent.  This is a welcome and much needed step forward for the two academies as we pursue the expansion of the facility.  

 

FCPS:

 

During the past several months, the business office has been busy producing back-up materials for the District’s fiscal oversight review (conducted on November 14), interviewing and hiring a new Payroll Specialist (congratulations and welcome to Marcela Guerrero), and working on a short timeline to gather information and supporting documents in preparation for the request for conduit bond financing from the California School Finance Authority (CSFA).  Working with numerous bankers, investment brokers, financial advisors, and attorneys, we have learned several key lessons, while the District’s fiscal oversight review emphasized the second bullet point below.  Most we already knew; a couple are new and a result of the changing educational climate in California; all are lessons we must all learn and remember:

 

    • oReputation is key to the possibility of any future endeavor.  Every staff member must understand the significance and impact of Fenton’s long and positive history.  The approval of the Material Amendment last month, on consent, is an example.  Remember:  It takes many years to build an exemplary reputation, but only one careless act to lose it.  This fact cannot be over-emphasized as we enter the new era of AB 1505.
    • oFinancial discipline sets us apart from the typical charter school.  The strong cash reserves we have built and maintained at our three oldest and largest schools have been acknowledged by all parties listed above, and their strength is key to why there is faith in the future financial growth of the Academies.  
    • oThe District’s fiscal oversight review once again highlighted the importance of all staff members understanding and following our accounting procedures.
    • oDocumentation for 31 checks was requested which consists of a copy of the canceled check and all paperwork that supports the expense.  We were asked how travel reimbursement is requested (copies of all itemized receipts – the word “itemized” was key here; copy of registration for the workshop or conference; agenda and materials distributed at the event – in short detailed receipts and copies of everything that prove attendance), and approved (signed off by Director of the school, reviewed by Administrative Assistant Stacey Manzo, Chief Academic Officer David Riddick and then finally approved for payment by the ED), the time line for approvals (within 60 days of the expense – again, a key point the District wanted to hear – beyond 60 days, there is no reimbursement), the limits of reimbursement, and names of those in the office who oversee this.  Everyone needs to take more responsibility in submitting documentation that is precise (receipts added correctly), complete (correct receipts, copies of all materials requested), and reviewed carefully prior to submitting to the business office.
    • oFor credit cards, we were asked similar questions for 59 items:  the limit for one item ($750); the limit for each month for each cardholder ($5,000); and to describe how expenses are determined to be appropriate.  Those items that appeared questionable, were brought to our attention and we explained how and why each occurred.  I hope that in the future nothing ‘stands out’ as unusual or questionable when the District reviews documentation, as this process has become quite tedious and would not be necessary with more attention by card holders.  
    • oAcademic performance across the organization is scrutinized as it reveals the instructional strength of the schools as compared to the District and the State.  This will now be more significant with the implementation of AB 1505 beginning in July 2020 as the “colors” on the California School Dashboard take on new meaning.  The bond financing process gave us a glimpse of how strong growth at every Fenton school is critical.  No school can lag behind or fall short for each plays a role in painting the full picture of the organization.  With this in mind, perhaps we should consider the following to build the capacity of each school:
    • oChange the manner that the schools are reorganized each year to encourage continuous growth and positive change.  I know a number of teachers would like to move to other sites, but it is nearly impossible unless someone resigns or retires. 
    • oInstead of a ‘closed’ process that is conducted separately at each site, establish a totally comprehensive and open process across the five schools for each job title (teachers, counselors, psychologists, etc.).
    • oUtilize student performance (MAP for primary grades; CAASPP performance for grades 3 – 5) and administrators’ input to ensure there is optimum strength at each grade level and each school.
    • oHave the Leadership Team work with Administrators and selected Board members to work out the logistics of such a plan.
    • oEnrollment trends are another area carefully scrutinized.  If schools fall short of their projections, or enrollment numbers needed to adequately fund the school – and pay their bills – are not realized, there is concern that any funds borrowed will not be repaid.  A legitimate concern and one that the schools must remember as recruitment efforts for the new school year begin.  This is also the reason why enrollment must be carefully monitored daily to ensure enrollment matches staffing.  The Directors and Chief Academic Officer are working on a Reduction in Force policy to present to the Board at the January meeting, with the Board determining the final policy.  Enrollment and staffing considerations work hand-in-hand with “financial discipline”.  It is very easy to move into a negative situation as numbers fall short year after year and difficult decisions, such as Reduction in Force, are not made.  This is a new situation for the Fenton schools, but it is one we must be prepared to address knowing that Reduction in Force affects the ratio of students to staff at all levels and classifications, not only the number of teachers. 
    • oThis last item “Enrollment” and the serious decline in enrollment facing schools across California, and especially in Los Angeles, is a major concern.  As our three largest schools approach renewal in 2022, it is imperative that academic performance reflect significant gains this year and next, and an innovative area of focus be considered at each site.  Some thoughts about each site:
    • oThe organization:  We are also pursuing State Preschool at each Fenton campus and this could attract more families.  The five schools will be presented as a consortium of schools to enhance the possibility for selection in this competitive process.
    • oFCLA and STEM should continue their recruitment efforts, and target more populated areas of the East Valley as an expanded facility will increase the cost of the lease and the amount of debt.  Increasing enrollment to capacity will be key to an instructional model that can be fully funded.
    • oRenewal of FACS, FPC and SMBCCS in 2022 (renewal petitions will be submitted in July/August 2021):  Each school should begin today to identify how to increase each school’s visibility in the community –
      • SMBCCS is working on recognition as an Apple Distinguished School and should continue their efforts to implement an outstanding STEAM model that is well recognized in East Hollywood and the surrounding community.
      • FACS and FPC should consider how to entice more families to matriculate from FPC to FACS – we are losing far too many students between 2nd and 3rd grades when the students should be moving to FACS.  The number of students from FPC who no not enroll at FACS is very surprising, and significant.
        • ïOne strategy brought to my attention is to change the grade level configurations of the two schools so they both offer TK-5.  FACS could also offer TK-6 because space is available.  Families have shared that having their children at two different sites is harder to manage (two drop-offs; two pick-ups) and having all their elementary-age children at one campus would be welcome by the community.  This of course would mean that each school should determine a strong focus area that distinguishes one school from the other, and distinguishes the two schools from all other schools in the area. 
        • ïA Material Amendment for FACS could be submitted next month (January 2020) to request sixth grade with a focus on The Help Group program being implemented there this year (although the amendment would simply request a specified number of sixth grade classes and could not be restricted to Special Education students only).  It would be a reasonable request to add 6th grade in ’20-21 due to the desire to offer a full continuum of Special Education Services and using the fact that some of the current students in the program are in 5th grade.  Something to consider, but the amendment needs to be written and submitted soon as there is no timeline for public hearings or final votes for Material Amendments.

I encourage the Directors and all staff to consider how to prepare for renewal in 2022 and begin the effort now.   All efforts should be shared with the Board as they unfold, as the Board will be the final decision maker on new focus efforts or any other changes such as grade level span.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

All matters listed under the consent agenda are considered by the Board to be routine and will be approved/enacted by the Board in one motion in the form listed below.  Unless specifically requested by a Board member for further discussion or removed from the agenda, there will be no discussion of these items prior to the Board’s vote on them.  The Executive Director recommends approval of all consent agenda items.

 

There are no consent agenda items.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV. ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR ACTION 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item IV.A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to review and receive the draft of the June 30, 2019 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

BACKGROUND

 

Each year, an independent fiscal audit is required to review the financial practices and year-end position of local educational agencies.  Audits must be conducted in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the U.S. and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States.

 

ANALYSIS

 

An audit of the Fenton Charter Public Schools was conducted by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP (formerly Vicenti, Lloyd, & Stutzman, LLP).  A draft of the consolidated audit report was received on November 29, 2019, and is attached here for review and discussion by the Board.  

 

As per state requirements, once finalized, the audit will be filed with the State Controller’s Office, Los Angeles County Office of Education, and the authorizing district, LAUSD by December 15, 2019.  The final audit will also be sent to Board members once received from the auditors and a Special Meeting of the Board scheduled in mid-December, if needed, to formally receive and file the June 30, 2019 consolidated audit.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors receive and review the draft of the June 30, 2019 consolidated audit report for the Fenton Charter Public Schools. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: June 30, 2019 DRAFT Consolidated Audit

Item IV.B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve LAUSD Certification of Board Compliance Review

 

BACKGROUND

 

As part of the responsibility set forth in Education Code § 47604.3, the authorizing district of the five Fenton schools, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), through the Charter Schools Division (CSD), monitors each school’s compliance with applicable legal and policy requirements.  

 

ANALYSIS

 

The oversight entails two actions on the part of the charter school’s Governing Board:

 

        1. 1.Certification of Board Compliance Review:  As part of the Governing Board’s fulfillment of its fiduciary responsibility to ensure that the charter schools comply with all applicable laws and other requirements, the Governing Boards are asked to periodically review, discuss, monitor, and modify, if necessary, the schools’ policies, systems, and procedures for compliance with such requirements.  The chair of the Governing Board is to sign a certification at the end of the documents supplied by the District and to return the documents, along with relevant Board agendas and minutes that document the Board’s review of these compliance items, no later than January 13, 2020.   
        2. 2.Documentation of Compliance:  The CSD will review documentation of compliance with several key legal requirements as part of this year’s annual performance-based oversight visit to each school.  Schools were asked to prepare documentation as requested by the CSD in four binders:  Binder 1, Binder 2, Binder 3 and Binder 3A.  Additionally, document requirements under the CSD’s purview have been simplified into quarterly deadlines (i.e. Qi, Q2, Q3, and Q4) to minimize the number of times schools are asked to send information to the division on an annual basis.  This reorganization has been designed to consolidate multiple document requests and reduce the amount of time school leaders spend on oversight visit preparation, since many of the items have been removed from the oversight visit binder checklist.  The quarterly submission calendar has been organized so that the bulk of the documents coincide with schools’ beginning of the year compliance reviews.  

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors review the materials prepared for the LAUSD Charter School Division’s oversight visits, and if the materials are in order and satisfactory, approve the “Certification of Board Compliance Review” documents for each school.  

 

Oversight visits have been scheduled as follows and all Board members are welcome at each site to participate in the oversight process:

 

Fenton Charter Public Schools:  November 14, 2019 (fiscal) 

Fenton Primary Center: February 4, 2020

Santa Monica Blvd. Community Charter School:  February 6, 2020 Fenton Charter Leadership Academy:  February 13, 2020

Fenton STEM Academy:  February 14, 2020

Fenton Avenue Charter School:  February 19, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments: Materials to be sent to LAUSD Charter Schools Division - Compliance Monitoring and Certification of Board Compliance Review 2019-2020; December 5, 2019 FCPS Board Agenda; unapproved minutes from December 5, 2019 Board Meeting; January 30, 2020 FCPS Board Agenda

Item IV.C.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve expenditures for items above spending authority of Executive Director

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Executive Director has authority to approve expenditures up to $25,000; expenditures over that amount must be approved by the Board of Directors.  

 

ANALYSIS

 

The following expenditure exceeds the Executive Director’s spending authority, and the Board is asked to review and approve the item:

 

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School:  Walk in freezer - $28,458.51(lowest bid was from V. L. Shaw, Inc.)

 

The current walk-in freezer has been repaired numerous times, which has resulted in lost product and ongoing expense.  A new walk-in freezer is needed.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the expenditure as presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments:  Quotes for walk-in freezer

Item IV.D.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to ratify and accept Memorandum of Understanding and Grant Agreement with Think Together

 

BACKGROUND

 

Youth Policy Institute (YPI) was instrumental in the receipt of After School Education and Safety (“ASES”) and 21st Century Learning Centers (“21st CCLC”) Program grants on behalf of the Fenton schools.  Fenton Avenue Charter School, Fenton Primary Center and Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School were recipients of the 21st Century grants; Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Primary Center received ASES grants.  These grants provided essential after school opportunities for students, often a key factor as parents determine enrollment options.

 

ANALYSIS

 

On October 25, 2019, Youth Policy Institute closed its doors, and the many schools serviced by the organization were at a loss as to how the grants would proceed, if at all.  Think Together is a community-based organization with over twenty years of experience serving the needs of communities through after school programs, early learning opportunities, student support services and in-school training to support school improvement.  On October 26th, Think Together began on-boarding former YPI employees to ensure ASES and 21st CCLC grants continued operation at the many charter schools across Los Angeles that had depended on YPI for grant implementation and oversight.

 

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Think Together and FCPS was signed on October 28 and all programs at all Fenton schools were conducted as usual on Monday, October 28.  The transition was seamless.

 

A second Memorandum of Understanding was signed and back-dated to October 21, 2019 to ensure all former 21st Century Kids staff members who continued to work through the bankruptcy were paid and covered with grant dollars during the week of uncertainty with YPI.  Many reported to work on Friday, October 25th at SMBCCS (the Valley schools were closed due to fire danger) understanding there was no guarantee they would be paid for their work that day or even for the days already worked that week.  This MOU covers salaries for that week, and also formally recognizes Think Together as the agency working with the Fenton schools to implement the 21st CCLC program grants received for FPC, FACS and SMBCCS.  The MOU allows Think Together to serve as the fiscal and administrative agent, necessary if any Fenton paraprofessionals desire to work in the after school program as well as working as a Fenton teacher assistant, which is the case with many of the workers. 

 

Finally, a Grant Program Services Agreement was signed on October 21st for the same reasons stated above, but for a different grant:  the ASES grant program.  This program also continued uninterrupted at FPC and STEM (with services also extended to FCLA).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors ratify and accept the Executive Director’s execution of the MOU and Grant Agreement with Think Together as presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Memorandum of Understanding and Grant Agreement Between Fenton Charter Public Schools and Think Together

Item IV.E.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to ratify and accept contract with Grants Republic for grant writing services 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Stan Saunders is the extraordinary grant writer who was employed by Youth Policy Institute (YPI).   He successfully wrote numerous federal and state grants for YPI and charter schools across Los Angeles, including the Fenton schools.

 

ANALYSIS

 

After the closure of YPI on October 25th, the Executive Director and Chief Academic Officer contacted Mr. Saunders to determine his interest in working for FCPS.  He has worked with us in the past, and was immediately interested in a continued partnership.  A contract was executed quickly due to the possible release of 21st Century Community Learning Center (“21st CCLC”) grant applications and After School Educational and Safety (“ASES”) grant applications for the 2020-2021 school year.  These grants have been vital to providing Fenton families with before school and after school programs and the ED and CAO sought to ensure every avenue for continued funding was explored.  This initial contract is on a retainer basis, and there are no fees unless appropriate and desired grants are identified and grant writing services requested by the schools.  Mr. Saunders will also regularly search for grants which could be of interest and relevant to Fenton’s mission. 

 

Shortly after connecting with Mr. Saunders, the California State Preschool Program (“CSPP”) expansion funding grant application was released, and the ED and CAO believed it was imperative to quickly engage Mr. Saunders’ assistance in writing this grant.  It should be noted that Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School was notified at the beginning of this school year that this would be the last year of its State Preschool Program.  With Mr. Saunders past success in establishing a consortium of schools to best capture prioritization points considered for determining funding, it was decided a consortium composed of the five Fenton schools to be the best approach for grant submission, as the location of FPC, surprisingly, places the school at a higher priority than SMBCCS.  If successful, FPC will be the lead school.  This contract was initiated and the Directors and Chief Academic Officer have been actively engaged in conversations with Mr. Saunders to ensure a timely submission of the grant for the consortium.  It is hoped that all five schools will have a State Preschool Program on their campuses beginning in 2020-2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors ratify and accept the contracts as presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Contracts for Grant Writing Services; CSPP Application

Item IV.F.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to ratify and accept contract with Schwab Actuarial Services to produce 10-year projection of OPEB costs

 

BACKGROUND

 

With the implementation of GASB 45 in June 2004, the cost of providing medical, dental and vision insurance coverage to retirees and accurately projecting those costs became an area of focus for the organization. As one of the first conversion charter schools in LAUSD, Fenton has always viewed its history and performance in all areas of school management and operations as critical to the future of the charter movement in Los Angeles and California.  As such, as the organization has grown from one school to five, fulfilling all obligations, even those inherited from the authorizing district, are recognized by the FCPS Board of Directors as critical to maintaining the integrity of the organization internally and externally.

 

Rather than following the mechanism utilized by the authorizing district to determine retiree health benefits, essentially 100% coverage for all employees at the time of retirement, a formula was devised with input from all stakeholders that would provide post-employment benefits based on history with the authorizing district, the organization, and public education in the state of California, while also considering the long-term costs and sustainability of the plan.

 

ANALYSIS

 

Yearly, FCPS has contracted for FASB ASC 715 Actuarial Reports, originally with Grant Thornton LLP and most recently with Schwab Actuarial Services.   These annual reports are presented to the Board for consideration, as well as the authorizing district, LAUSD, and independent auditors.  

 

Last school year, the District requested that in addition to the annual actuarial reports, we contract for a long-term projection of the organization’s obligation.  This was again brought to our attention during the Charter School Division’s fiscal oversight review in November.  Fenton’s OPEB, and how it is managed, is of considerable interest to the District.

 

On November 8, 2019, Schwab Actuarial Services was asked to perform a 10-year projection of FCPS’ OPEB liability and cash funding projections to better inform the Board as future policies and strategies necessary to sustain the OPEB Trust are determined.

  

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors ratify and accept the contract for Actuarial Services:  Liability and Cash Funding Projections from Schwab Actuarial Services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Statement of Work – Actuarial Services, Liability and Cash Funding Projections

Item IV.G.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to ratify and accept contracts with various vendors

 

BACKGROUND

 

During the past 26 years, Fenton has informally employed a number of community members and neighborhood businesses in an effort to assist the communities in which our schools are located.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The District has requested contracts from these vendors if their work over the course of the year totals $10,000 or more.  The vendors have complied and the contracts are included here.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors ratify and accept the contracts for gardening services and private security as presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Contracts for gardening services (Martinez Landscaping) and campus security (Private Security)

Item IV.H.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve expansion plan for Fenton Charter Leadership Academy and Fenton STEM Academy

 

BACKGROUND

 

In 2012, SFV Education, a nonprofit public benefit corporation, and SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC were established for the purpose of acquiring facilities for Fenton schools.  SFV 11351 Dronfield was created for the sole purpose of constructing a separate site for the Fenton Primary Center and moving Fenton Avenue Charter School off a year round, multi-track calendar.  A $14,174,200 New Market Tax Credit loan used to construct the Fenton Primary Center is now due for repayment and refinancing possibilities have been explored.  (See Item IV.I. for more detail.)

 

In 2014, SFV 8926 Sunland LLC was established for the purpose of securing a facility for Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Charter Leadership Academy.  A site at 8926 Sunland Boulevard was identified and a long-term lease agreement entered into between the owner, Continental Sunland, LLC (the landlord), and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC. In June 2019, a building located on the same property as the Fenton Academies and adjacent to the FCPS leased offices became available.   

 

The need to refinance the SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC loan and procure an additional loan for expansion of  SFV 8926 Sunland LLC led to the decision of the SFV Education Board of Directors to fold the two LLCs into one new entity named SFV Fenton Facilities LLC.  The name change was approved by the SFV Education Board on December 2, 2019.

 

At the same meeting of the SFV Education Board of Directors, new leases between Fenton Primary Center, Fenton STEM Academy, Fenton Charter Leadership Academy and FCPS (for the leased office space) with SFV Fenton Facilities LLC were approved.  

 

The SFV Fenton Facilities LLC includes the continued lease for the Fenton Primary Center and the Sunland site for the Academies.  New to the lease is the inclusion of the FCPS offices and an additional building on the same property as the Academies.  

 

The SFV Education Board of Directors approved the new lease for FPC, the new lease for FCLA and STEM, and the FCPS office lease with Continental Sunland, LLC.  

ANALYSIS

 

The FCPS Board of Directors is now asked to approve the expansion of Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Charter Leadership Academy in light of the possibilities the new lease presents.  Here are the specifics of the plan:

 

The building had been occupied by the same business since construction of the building in 1987.  The site offers an additional 20,000 square feet of space and once renovated and retrofitted, will house additional classrooms, small offices, a multipurpose room and rooftop playground.  Negotiations to revise the current lease and add the additional building began in May, and were finalized on Monday, November 25, 2019.  The attached document presents the difference between the negotiated revised lease and the original lease.  Significant changes to the revised lease are described below:

 

        • ïThe final lease agreed to increases at 1.75% annually and started on December 1, 2019.  (It should be noted that the costs per seat projected on the attached chart are based on a total enrollment at Sunland of 888 students.  Fewer than 888 students will increase the calculated per seat costs; capacity enrollment of 1,056 students will decrease the per seat costs.  Hence the need for an aggressive and successful enrollment strategy beginning immediately and continuing long-term.)  
        • ïStarting on July 1, 2030, in addition to the 1.75% fixed annual increase, the rent increases if the Consumer Price Index (CPI) percentage change in the prior twelve (12) months is >3.5%.  If it does exceed 3.5%, the amount over 3.5% gets added to the 1.75% increase. 

It cannot be over emphasized how the landlord has worked with us in good faith to ensure the schools continue to be viable entities that will be sustained into the future.

 

It should be noted that the additional building will add eleven (11) additional classrooms to the current thirty-six (36) in the 8926 building, with the goal of filling every classroom in both buildings with twenty-four (24) students.  The architect configured the 20,000 square feet building to include eleven classrooms, each with over 800 square feet of interior space, while adding small offices, special education classrooms, restrooms, a multipurpose room, and a staff lounge. He also created a plan for renovating the rooftop for outdoor play space.  This will alleviate the rooftop parking, but considering the expense of this addition, it is believed best to utilize the rooftop totally for much needed outdoor play space for students rather than saving a limited number of parking spaces.  (See Item IV.I.)  

 

The Material Amendment approved by the LAUSD Board of Education on November 19 will allow the addition of sixth grade to both schools, but even with the addition of this grade level in 2020, some classrooms may be vacant upon initial opening of the building and may be used for other purposes temporarily.  It is imperative that all staff understands the necessity of working to reach capacity enrollment which is described below:

 

        • ïThe capacity of the first building is 864 students (36 X 24 = 864).  
        • ïThe capacity of the addition will be 264 students (11 X 24 = 264).
        • ïThe schools’ goal is to reach the total of 1,128 (864 + 264 = 1,1,28) or 564 students for each school.  

These numbers will assist the schools in reaching the goal of four month’s cash on hand.  Presently, they have just over one month’s cash reserves. 

 

The Board is asked to approve the plan for expansion of the Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Charter Leadership Academy as described above.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve the expansion plan for Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Charter Leadership Academy as presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Existing Lease vs. New Lease Comparison Sheet; Lease for 8926 Sunland, 8928B Sunland Boulevard with addition of 8928A Sunland Boulevard and Addendum

Item IV.I.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Recommendation to approve Resolution #38:  Issuance of Education Revenue Bonds to Refinance New Market Tax Credit Loan for SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC, and   Refinance Clearinghouse Loan and Finance Expansion Efforts for SFV 8926 Sunland LLC

 

BACKGROUND

 

In 2012, SFV Education, a non-profit pubic benefit corporation, was formed exclusively to facilitate the development of school facilities for schools managed by FCPS.   SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC was established at the same time under the umbrella of SFV Education for the purpose of constructing the Fenton Primary Center.  Pacific Charter School Development (PCSD) was engaged to oversee the construction of the 55,000 square feet, two-story building and the school opened on September 4, 2013.    SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC borrowed $14,174,200 through a New Market Tax Credit (NMTC) loan from ExED Facilities X, LLC, the lender.  Four loans make up the NMTC loan, which was issued for seven (7) years and is now due to be paid in full on December 20, 2019. 

 

In 2014, SFV Education established another LLC, SFV 8926 Sunland LLC, for the purpose of securing a facility for Fenton STEM Academy and Fenton Charter Leadership Academy.  A site at 8926 Sunland Boulevard was identified and a long-term lease agreement entered into between the owner, Continental Sunland, LLC (the landlord) and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC.  The landlord (“LL”) owns the two adjacent buildings plus a parking structure at 8926 and 8928 Sunland Boulevard.  FCPS signed a lease for the entire 8926 building of 50,000 square feet in October 2014.  This lease is now with SFV 8926 Sunland LLC.  In 2016, FCPS and the LL entered into a separate shorter lease for the 8,250 square feet office space in the 8928 building.   Pacific Charter School Development (PCSD) was engaged to oversee the conversion of the 8926 building to school use and oversaw approximately $7,000,000 of new construction consisting of seismic upgrades plus new systems and tenant improvements.  FCLA and STEM opened on August 17, 2015.  The facility has thirty-six (36) classrooms, multipurpose room, offices, hands-on lab and conference room, and an enrollment capacity (as per stated LCAP goals of twenty-four students per classroom) of 864 students.  FCPS has only office uses in the 8928 building (8928B), since it has not been adapted for school use.  Phase 1 of the Sunland school site construction was financed in part through a $5,500,000 loan from Clearinghouse CDFI to SFV 8926 Sunland LLC.  The loan closed in February 2015.

 

The 8928A building, adjacent to the 8926 school building, has an additional 20,000 square feet of space that had been leased to unrelated third parties since the building’s construction in 1987.  The additional space is now vacant, and the LL and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC have been negotiating a potential new lease that would 1) replace the existing leases for the school (8926) and office (8928B); and 2) encompass all of the 78,529 square feet, two-building complex owned by Continental Sunland, LLC at 8926 and 8928 (A and B) Sunland.  The terms of the new lease were finalized on Monday, November 25, 2019.

 

PCSD will oversee the renovations required to adapt the 8928A building to school use.  These renovations include eleven (11) classrooms, a multipurpose room, offices, and a rooftop playground for an additional 264 students.  Costs are driven in part by structural upgrades needed for the rooftop playground and seismic retrofitting.  The estimated total cost of the 8928A Phase 2 construction and renovation is $6,960,157.  Additionally, to better identify the interests of the Limited Liability Company and the entities it represents, the name will be changed to SFV Fenton Facilities, LLC.

 

Mike Keeley, an attorney and former Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles under Mayor Richard Riordan, was contracted by Irene Sumida on behalf of FCPS and Joe Lucente on behalf of SFV Education on December 6, 2018 to determine a strategy for refinancing both loans and financing the expansion of the Sun Valley site.

 

ANALYSIS

 

At the October 24, 2019 regular meeting of the FCPS Board of Directors, RBC Capital Markets, LLC was formally approved as the underwriter for the Fenton Charter Public Schools as related to the issuance of Education Revenue Bonds pursuant to the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Municipal Advisor Rule.  FCPS is the “Obligor” and the bonds will be issued on behalf of FCPS by an entity authorized to do so under State statute (“Issuer”).  

 

The California School Finance Authority (CSFA) serves as a conduit issuer on behalf of non-profit borrowers, such as FCPS, to provide access to the capital markets.  CSFA’s low-cost fee structure, its intercept mechanism, and its no-cost, state-level Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) hearing process has made CSFA the issuer of choice for creditworthy non-profit borrowers and school districts throughout the state.  To date CSFA has issued more than $1.5 billion in bonds to provide low-cost, fixed rate financing to California’s schools.

 

On October 9, 2019, a Financing Program Application was submitted to the California School Finance Authority.  The application lists SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC and SFV 8926 Sunland LLC as the borrowers/owners, and the Sole Member of the Borrower as SFV Education.  The project description and costs are below:

 

        • Project Description/Users:

Finance the repayment of the existing loans made to SFV 11351 Dronfield LLC by ExED Facilities X, LLC pursuant to the 2012 NMTC financing of the Dronfiled campus which houses the Fenton Primary Center, an elementary school serving grades TK-2 ($14,173,200)

 

Finance the repayment of a 2015 facilities loan made to SFV 8926 Sunland LLC by Clearinghouse CDFI for a Sun Valley campus containing school facilities on which Fenton Charter Leadership Academy (serving grades TK-5) and Fenton STEM Academy (serving grades TK-5) ($5,665,000)

 

TBD:  Financing of Phase 2 improvement which includes 12 classrooms, multipurpose room, parking and rooftop playground for the Sun Valley campus ($1,850,000)

 

        • Other Estimated Project Costs

Debt Service Reserve Fund:  $664,363

 

Cost of Issuance:  $591,295

 

The Total Not-to-Exceed Amount:  $30,000,000

 

Tax-Exempt Not-to-Exceed Amount:  $28,000,000

 

Taxable Not-to-Exceed Amount:  $2,000,000

 

        • Expected issuance date:  12/30/2019
        • Bond Type:  Charter School Revenue Bonds
        • Estimated Annual Payment:  $1,275,000
        • Structure:  Obligated Group
        • Sale Method:  Public Offering
        • Entities Involved in Transaction:

Issuer:  California School Finance Authority (CSFA), 300 Spring Street, Suite 8500, Los Angeles, CA  90013 (Katrina Johantgen, Jose Franco, and Robert Biegler); California State Treasurer’s Office (STO), 915 Capitol Mall, Room 110, Sacramento, CA  95814 (Julie Giordano, Geoff Palmertree, Gary Watkins, Adrian Leung, and Mark Paxson)

 

Issuer’s Counsel:  Office of the Attorney General, 1300 I Street, Suite 125, PO Box 944255, Sacramento, CA  94244 (Gisele Rainer, Stepan Haytayan)

 

Borrower’s Counsel:  MusickPeeler, One Wilshire Building, 624 South Grand Avenue, Suite 2000, Los Angeles, CA  90071 (Brian Holman and Robert Zeller)

 

Underwriter:  RBC Capital Markets, LLC, 777 S. Figueroa Street, Suite 850, Los Angeles, CA  90017 (John Solarczyk, Akshai Patel, and Dustin Daily)

 

Underwriter’s Counsel:  Kutak Rock LLP, 777 S. Figueroa Street, Suite 4550, Los Angeles, CA  90017 (Jessica Shaham and John Bales)

 

Bond Counsel:  Orrick, 405 Howard Street, San Francisco, CA 94105-2669 (Eugene Clark-Herrera, Steffi Chan, and Mark Bauer)

 

Municipal Advisor:  Urban Futures, Inc., 17821 E. 17th Street, Suite 245, Tustin, CA  92780 (John Phan)

 

Trustee:  Wilmington Trust, 650 Town Center Drive, Suite 800, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (John Deleray and Jeanie Mar)

Trustee’s Counsel:  Taboada Rochlin Govier LLP, 4212 E. Los Angeles Avenue, Suite 3158, Simi Valley, CA  93063

 

Developer:  Pacific Charter School Development, 600 Wilshire Boulevard #200, Los Angeles, CA  90017 (Tina Lin)

 “Appendix A” was written by Dr. Riddick, Ms. Dietz, and Mrs. Sumida to describe the schools, the organization and our history related to finances, academic performance, and enrollment.  This document is just a portion of the items requested by the underwriters for preparation of submission to the CSFA prior to funding consideration.  The business office also provided over one hundred documents to Underwriter’s Counsel to support past performance and history.

 

The CSFA is meeting on December 6th to approve or deny FCPS’ application.  The Executive Director is attending the meeting in Sacramento to represent the organization.  

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

It is recommended that the Board of Directors approve Resolution #38, which supports the issuance of Education Revenue Bonds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: Resolution #38, Appendix A, CSFA Application, CSFA December 6, 2019 Agenda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V.  ITEMS SCHEDULED FOR INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item V.A.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: David Riddick

Chief Academic Officer

 

SUBJECT: Update on FCPS OPEB Trust

 

BACKGROUND

 

The FCPS OPEB Trust was formally established at the East West Bank and an investment portfolio created on March 28, 2016.  The portfolio was transferred to Cathay Wealth Management on October 30, 2017.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The President of the Trust, Walter Wallace, will provide an update, which includes the estimated December 2019 deposit to the OPEB Trust account:

 

Location

Amount

Fenton Avenue Charter School

$180,062

Fenton Primary Center

$113,426

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

$164,275

Fenton STEM Academy

$49,225

Fenton Charter Leadership Academy

$55,054

Fenton Charter Public Schools

$60,461

TOTAL

$622,503

 

Calculations for contributions from each site will be finalized by the end of the month, and will be transferred to the OPEB Trust account at East West Bank.  The trustees will work with John Coury, our financial advisor for the trust, to determine how these funds will be invested, and then funds will be transferred to the OPEB Investment Account at Cathay Wealth Management.

 

In November, Brett Schwab, the actuary utilized for FASB ASC 715 reporting, was asked to conduct a 10-year projection for OPEB expenses to better inform the Board as to how to plan for future expenses. (See Item IV.F.)

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

This is an information item only and no action is required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment: OPEB Account Review – 12/02/2019

Item V.B.

 

 

FENTON CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

December 5, 2019

 

TO: Fenton Charter Public Schools

Board of Directors

 

FROM: Irene Sumida

President

 

SUBJECT: Recognition of FCPS Student Achievement Symposium Presenters

 

BACKGROUND

 

The first FCPS Student Achievement Symposium was held on Friday, November 1, 2019 at Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School.  Certificated staff from all five schools attended and participated in the variety of presentations offered by Fenton teachers.

 

ANALYSIS

 

The upper grade keynote speaker was Yesenia Fuentes from FCLA, and primary grade keynote speakers were Bunny Wolfer and Jennifer Flynn from SMBCCS.  

 

Break out sessions were presented by the following teachers:

 

        • ïJazmin Luna (SMBCCS) – “R.A.C.E. and Kagan Structures” 
        • ïAJ Smith (SMBCCS) – “Google Tools:  Innovation, Collaboration, Organization and Sustainability” 
        • ïRobin Brenneisen and Leanna Hendrix (FACS) – “Demystifying the SBAC ELA Performance Task” 
        • ïGaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto (SMBCCS) – “Sketches School and More” 
        • ïCarmen Solis (SMBCCS) – “Nearpod:  a Versatile Tool for Learning” 
        • ïEmma Colmenares (SMBCCS) – “Running Small Groups Effectively During Math”  
        • ïSarah Ananta, Briana Ellis, Karen Knapp, Judy Lee, Mara Shinn Smith and Annie Yi FPC) – “Intentional Interventions:  Meeting Our Students Where They’re At” 
        • ïElisa Vallejo and Alejandra Muñoz (STEM) – Making Reading Growth Transfer to SBAC Assessments:  How Explicit and Procedural Test-Taking Strategies Affect Assessment Achievement” 
        • ïLisa DeFrancesco and AJ Smith (SMBCCS) – “Lights, Camera…Learning!  How to Bring Reader’s Theatre to the Classroom” 
        • ïGaby Arroyo and Jennifer Nishimoto (SMBCCS) – “Coding is for Everyone!” 
        • ïKim Kiser (SMBCCS) and Kelley Christenson (STEM) – “Addressing Chronic Absenteeism with MTSS Strategies in the Classroom”

The day showcased the exceptional work of these very talented teachers, and was appreciated by all attendees.  This will hopefully become a yearly event.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

This is an information item only and no action is required. 

 

Fenton Charter Public Schools

 

Board Meeting Dates

2018-2019

 

All board meetings begin at 4:30 p.m.

 

 

September 20, 2018

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

October 25, 2018

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

December 6, 2018

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90038

 

January 31, 2019

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

March 7, 2019

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

April 18, 2019

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352

 

May 23, 2019

Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School

1022 North Van Ness Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90038

 

June 13, 2019

Fenton Charter Public Schools Offices

8928B Sunland Boulevard

Sun Valley, CA 91352